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Kinniska
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Grabbed this from the library as an afterthought as I was picking up something else, but I‘m enjoying hell out of the travel and random personalities.

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Kinniska
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I have to admit that I expected this book to be somewhat dry or abstruse, but I have been reading it out of curiosity based on some family history.
I shouldn‘t have worried. It‘s been far more entertaining than I could‘ve hoped. It‘s often Dorothy Parker levels of skewering of the characters (and I do mean characters! Google Leon Ghilardi, for example).
Jokes aside it‘s also full of source citation; it‘s a great read.

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Kinniska
Mehso-so

Short read, I picked this up out of sheer curiosity because in the midst of preparing for an international move, I had heard about the events in this book about the royal family of Nepal. Didn‘t have time then to follow up to see if there was an investigation… this book seems to have been written not long after the events and so only provides a limited explanation, but at least steers clear of hyperbole. Sad story.

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Kinniska
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Took up reading about King Zogu because my grandparents actually met in Albania during Zog‘s reign/ era. What a strange time, and with absolute characters. Honestly I expected either transparent sentimentality or propaganda, but this has turned out to be a strangely entertaining book about not only the central character but all the people and circumstances around his rise to leadership.

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Kinniska
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This is a pretty lively summary of readings about discoverers and “discoverers”, explorers and mapmakers. Inherently a volatile mix of political chicanery, the hubris of men that think it‘ll be fun to sail off the edge of the world, scurvy, occasional deaths by polar bear, and the vicissitudes of pre-industrial economics, expansionism, and mercantilism, I found myself grimly laughing at all these misadventures.

Read it.

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Kinniska
Pickpick

I actually enjoy reading the correspondence of various writers — and Bruce Chatwin‘s is no different. In fact I enjoyed it as much as reading his collected articles, “What Am I Doing Here”

If you‘re not generally inclined towards letter reading then this won‘t be for you. But I find reading about the various trips they took, what they thought about people and events, all of that can be very entertaining.

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Kinniska

Whew. Fascinating, grim (how would it not be), but a solid read. I‘m about halfway through, and have also been enjoying the historical context the author provides — social and political status of all the people on board, how unbearably crowded it was, the influence of the Thirty Years War on the soldiers on board, etc.

rwmg I don't know where you're based, but have you seen the remains of the Batavia in the Shipwreck Museum just outside Perth, Western Australia? 2mo
Kinniska I‘m a Yank up in the New England area, and I haven‘t as yet gotten to explore anywhere in Australia, but I hope to do so while visiting friends in NZ some day. I saved the museum that holds collected items from the wreck to my Google maps list. 2mo
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review
Kinniska
Pickpick

I actually enjoy nonfiction graphic novels — it‘s like all the enjoyment of nonfiction with the marginalia (illustrations, editorial commentary) writ large.

There are several threads in this memoir and it was a fascinating process to walk along with her ruminations over the course of a commuting day.

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Kinniska
Pickpick

I picked this title up after it was referenced in a couple other travelogues. He goes on foot, has some of the languages and adopts numerous others, and ends up staying on in Central Europe, living there many years after, until the war.

He alternates among easygoing narrative, charming descriptions of the people he encounters, & florid architectural descriptions.
Skim the architecture, but don‘t miss the footnotes! So many unexpected anecdotes.

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Kinniska

Looking forward to reading this… although with some trepidation— after having just read the authors account of the ocean gate disaster

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2023/08/titan-submersible-implosion-warnings/amp

Although the disaster (warned of for years by basically everyone else in that industry) was a tough read, the history and current state of exploration in the ocean are fascinating.

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Kinniska
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Serendipitous read — picked up this title for my mother to read, (I supply her with library books along with groceries and other errands now that she has given up driving). I didn‘t bring any book with me when I came to help her; she‘s recuperating and sleeping, I picked up this title to read while I‘m staying with her. I‘ve read another John Gimlette title, “Elephant Complex” about Sri Lanka, it was excellent. Looking forward to this read.

Chrissyreadit Welcome to litsy!! My bio has a link with info about using litsy too. 2y
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Kinniska
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Solid way to open a discussion on mercenaries and the Hundred Years War. I especially liked the bit about the blind king of Bohemia insisting on riding into battle entangled with some loyal but benighted cavalrymen. This is what made me snort tho:

“Lying facedown in the mud encased in seventy pounds of armor was a disadvantageous position to be in.”

Well, you don‘t say!

Mitch Hey! Welcome to Litsy - the best bookish corner of the internet! 2y
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