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spine_destroyer

spine_destroyer

Joined January 2018

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🥰 could not have bought this any faster. hardback from 1938.

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Buddha of Suburbia | Hanif Kureishi
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excerpt from Anne Boyer‘s book “The Undying” published in the New Yorker (the piece is called “What cancer takes away”). i hadn‘t heard of her before, but now i want to read everything she‘s written. it‘s so true about fiction being about not being ill, without knowing it. if i wasn‘t broke i‘d run out and buy this.

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Miss Julie | August Strindberg
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Panpan

misogyny play. yes - i know this is to be expected with him - it is literally his brand - i just didn‘t expect it to depress me. it‘s one thing to hate women in a base way, and it‘s another to have the Strindbergian unquenchable need to ridicule women, these half-men half-animals going against their nature. in story after story! this extreme diligence - not only the works themselves but paired with the long polemical forewords - is what gets me.

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terrific book on Rosa Luxemburg. a bit of a palate cleanser.

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i am loving this.

Taylor This looks great. 3mo
2 likes1 comment
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Transit: A Novel | Rachel Cusk
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I literally let out an "really?" over this, it's just so close to self-parody. All adults look like weirdly aged babies, except for the few who look like they were born old. Very sad that it takes me a fortnight nowadays to read a short novel. Longing for a proper sized book but pain and anguish stands in the way of that. It's just impossible to imagine being in a different place & inhibiting a different body at this level of, well, suffering :/

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Transit: A Novel | Rachel Cusk
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this has happened to me too. a sudden funhouse mirror effect takes hold of reality and permanently disrupts your perception of it. this is one of many reasons i don't do any drugs (anymore). no hairdresser ever speaks this much to me though. they read my face and don't even bother trying.

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Transit: A Novel | Rachel Cusk
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i think i have book synaesthesia or something. the first cover i see just clings to my mental image of it forever, like it does an imprint, a sort of mood that i start associating with it... forever. this american cover on the left is as painfully on the nose as the last one, but with a pretty colour theme. the right one is my aesthetic and my sole reason for reading these hah. ok the writing is fine too

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Outline | Rachel Cusk
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Enjoying this book a lot but damn if American book design isn‘t 10-15 years behind. it makes me sad to see good writing get the personality-less airy-but-r e s p e c t a b l e treatment, with that noughties-feeling paper gradient. Topped off with the NYT seal of approval. It‘s so depressingly conformist and lifeless, the type of design that keeps me from getting interested at all. the cover on the right (British cover I think) is so much better.

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Double Negative | Teju Cole, Ivan Vladislavic
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Double Negative | Teju Cole, Ivan Vladislavic
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I never ever would have guessed Harold Bloom had a daringly original theory of anything.

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George Orwell: Essays | George Orwell
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Orwell on Yeats: “To begin with, in a single phrase, ‘great wealth in a few mens‘ hands‘, Yeats lays bare the central reality of Fascism, which the whole of its propaganda is designed to cover up.”

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George Orwell: Essays | George Orwell
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was delighted to find out that George Orwell wrote an essay on Henry Miller. I read Down & Out last year and it reminded me a great deal of Tropic of Cancer (which was published a year later, actually). this is how you do a scathing semicolon: “But he himself seems to me a man of one book. Sooner or later I should expect him to descend into unintelligibility, or into charlatanism; there are signs of both in his later work.”

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yates has the best eye for (& probably experience of) this type of scene - it just flies off the page.

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Villette | Charlotte Bront
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Happiness is indeed not a potato. Charlotte gets it!

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Villette | Charlotte Bront
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Hag reason 😭

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Karl Marx: A Life | Francis Wheen
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Karl Marx: A Life | Francis Wheen
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It doesn‘t look it but one of the funniest books I‘ve read

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Villette | Charlotte Bront
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love this cover

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The Information | Martin Amis
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‘You‘re not going to believe this‘

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To the Lighthouse | Virginia Woolf
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The Only Story: A novel | Julian Barnes
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Wuthering Heights | Emily Bront
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Seize the Day | Saul Bellow
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Howards End | E M Forster
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It is the vice of a vulgar mind to be thrilled by bigness

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Pnin | Vladimir Nabokov
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Poor Pnin landed in the middle of a strange town