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Origin
Origin: A Genetic History of the Americas | Jennifer Raff
8 posts | 5 read | 11 to read
From celebrated anthropologist Jennifer Raff comes the untold story -- and fascinating mystery -- of how humans migrated to the Americas.
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RowReads1
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What a coincidence. Im starting this at the same time as my Anthropology class starts.

38 likes1 stack add
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stevesbookstuf1
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Pickpick

We were taught that people first came to the Americas via the Bering Land Bridge. Raff starts her book there and gives a history of the archeology and genetic research into when and from where the Americas were peopled. Signs all still point to “Beringia“, but there are tantalizing clues (genetic and archeological) - that there is more to the story. Well written and not too bogged down with technical detail.

Full review: https://bit.ly/rvw_Origin

StaceGhost So cozy! 3mo
stevesbookstuf1 @StaceGhost My favorite chair for reading! 🙂 3mo
24 likes1 stack add2 comments
review
Hooked_on_books
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Mehso-so

Raff looks at the historic ideas of the origins of indigenous peoples of the Americas and refutes some entrenched ideas with current genetic research. There‘s a lot of good stuff in this book, but overall it‘s poorly done. She mixes in supposition with science, which weakens the latter, and spends too much time at the start establishing her own opinions, making it seem that she may have looked for the data to support her opinions.

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GingerAntics
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I really liked this book. It was fascinating to hear about the genetics of the indigenous peoples of what is now North America. I also enjoyed the ethical discussion of using something thought of as sacred to many indigenous peoples - DNA - to do research, especially with all the bad history that exists between indigenous peoples and western centric scientists/sciences.

GingerAntics This is certainly a conversation starter. I‘d love to know more. I‘m currently in search of more books on the topic. #JenniferRaff #Origin #archeology #palaeontology #genetics #indigenous #history 5mo
Graywacke How cool you were just reading this! Explains your comments. It‘s a terrific book. Glad you enjoyed and are hungry for more. I‘ve been looking for more like this. 5mo
Chelsea.Poole Glad to see your review. I forgot about this book. I‘m going to see if I can find an audiobook copy on Libby. 5mo
See All 6 Comments
GingerAntics @Graywacke have you found any? I haven‘t come up with anything yet. Maybe I‘m searching wrong. 5mo
GingerAntics @Graywacke that is truly unfortunate 5mo
22 likes2 stack adds6 comments
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stretchkev
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Pickpick

A very comprohensive overview of the modern understaning of the peopleing of North America. It is expert account of the most current scientifc, cultural, and archeaological findings from the past right to the present. Can be dense she does not shy away from scitenific jargon, but isn't too academic to be outside the general audience grasp. Although it took me a minute to remeber all those lessons on DNA.

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GingerAntics
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This is such an intriguing book. I will definitely read more by this author.
#JenniferRaff #Origin #Genetics #Palaeontology #archaeology #audiobook #busbooks

review
Graywacke
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Pickpick

I sampled this audiobook based a recommendation and because the title interested me. And I kept going because Raff writes engagingly and it‘s well narrated. It‘s little strange in that it focuses so much on the ethics of genetic research of American heritage, and in that it gives such a generalized light touch on the actual genetic history of the Americas. But it was enjoyable to listen and I learned some cool stuff.

Graywacke Pictured are the foot prints in White Sands in New Mexico. They were found recently, while Raff was writing, and dated 23,000 yrs old, which is old enough to force some rethinking of the existing ideas. 7mo
Ann_Reads Cool picture! It's amazing fossilized imprints of any kind could survive that many years. I guess the conditions and soil type(s) play huge role. 7mo
Graywacke @Ann_Reads yeah, a really special discovery. 7mo
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GingerAntics I think it‘s so generalised because of the ethical issues and because of the damage that‘s been done in relationships between indigenous communities and archeologist/palaeontologists/geneticists in the past and even continuing now. 5mo
Graywacke @GingerAntics She spends a lot of time on that. 5mo
GingerAntics @Graywacke because it‘s so important… it‘s possibly the most important part of the field going forward. 5mo
50 likes6 comments
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Graywacke
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My next audiobook. I started today.

GingerAntics This sounds absolutely intriguing!!! 8mo
Amiable This is on my TBR—looking forward to your thoughts on it. 8mo
Graywacke @GingerAntics @Amiable I‘m only about ten minutes in but it has a nice storytelling style. She has told me we know everything we learned in school is wrong. 8mo
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GingerAntics @Graywacke is that a surprise to you? Honestly? History in the American classroom isn‘t much more than propaganda. 8mo
Susanita This looks interesting and hopefully more accessible than 8mo
Graywacke @Susanita huh. I was interested in 1491. 8mo
Susanita I just found it hard to get into and a bit of an info dump. Perhaps the second edition is better. 8mo
Graywacke @Susanita good to know. Thanks! 8mo
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