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Graywacke

Graywacke

Joined June 2017

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The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare
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David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio
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Boccaccio by Thomas Goddard Bergin
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Graywacke
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I sampled four audiobooks and decided to go with this 24-hour one next.

GingerAntics Please tell me we‘re in the middle of humanity‘s teenage years, because seriously, so many people are acting like monstrous teenagers. 3d
Graywacke @GingerAntics 😂 they‘re more going on about how what (they think?) we think now is a lot different than how we used to imagine the flow of civilization. Rousseau and Hobb might not have gotten it right. 🙂 (to paraphrase and oversimplify: Hobbs said we are terrible animals contained by civilization. Rousseau said we have fallen from a happy fair primitive state into the mess of the struggles of civilization.) 3d
bnp Look forward to updates on this one. 3d
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Graywacke @bnp well, I learned Graeber is something of an anarchist and was in academic exile, teaching in London instead of the US. And that he passed away, unexpectedly, a year before this was published… 2d
bnp Yeah, it doesn't sound like a mainstream view, but it sounds interesting. 2d
GingerAntics @Graywacke oh, so it‘s kind of philosophy. The #deadphilosopherssociety might have to check this out. 1d
Graywacke @GingerAntics backdoor philosophy packaged as a data-based history (it‘s so far definitely not data based anything) 1d
GingerAntics @Graywacke that bites. When I want data, and it says data, I expect data people! 1d
Graywacke @GingerAntics I‘m trying to be patient with it. I‘m on hour 2. So maybe it will swing around and present something. 23h
GingerAntics @Graywacke oh wow it‘s a chunkster. It seems like there is probably still time for the statistics to start coming through. 13h
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review
Graywacke
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Mehso-so

(Ward, on the right, with her spouse)

This finally finishes the Booker 2020 longlist for me. It checks off some boxes. Healthy same-sex relationships and parenting. Interesting ideas mixed into some story context. It's good, but in an ok-good sort of way. Philosophical in that sterile doctor-office-clean prose way. It has an interesting ending and I probably should think more about it. More likely I won‘t think much about it at all.

vivastory Ha! I felt the same way about it. Wanted to like it more than I did. Interesting concept, not sure about the execution 3d
Graywacke @vivastory it's oddly difficult to express that. I mean I did enjoy listening. There isn't enough there. (but, the quotes before each chapter were wonderful.) 3d
vivastory I've thought about reading it again at some point, but I haven't quite convinced myself. It was thought provoking while reading but didn't stay with me. 3d
Graywacke @vivastory i‘ve thoroughly convinced myself not to. ☺️ 3d
38 likes4 comments
review
Graywacke
Madame de Treymes | Edith Wharton
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Pickpick

Gorgeous prose and terrific characterization. Wharton does a good job of making this a nice read with a lot going on under the surface. But it is limited by an only ok plot, and mainly of really wealthy people being really wealthy. The cultural tension is American faux-purity and French sophistication, and maybe the subtle lack of sincere emotion. The tension is not on the wealth itself. Still, I really enjoyed this. #whartonbuddyread

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Graywacke
The Two Gentlemen of Verona | William Shakespeare
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Crab and, yes, that guy as Lance, 1970.

Two Gentlemen of Verona - Act II
#Shakespearereadalong

Take out a couple Soliloquies by Proteus, and this is a fast moving very busy act with endless wit. About everyone is on stage, and we meet Lance, Crab, Silvia, Thurio, and the Duke. And we learn things“stand well” with Julia and Proteus. But, alas, Proteus throws a monkey 🔧 in - and self-justifies it. So, some dark overshadows the light. Thoughts?

TheBookHippie I found the Jew references 😱 I now they are there- still - yikes. Not a Lance fan! (edited) 3d
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TheBookHippie I found this fast moving fun and with a huge amount of quotables. I love my bed comes to mind!! 😂 3d
Lcsmcat I found myself wondering about the dog: his significance, yes, but mostly how did they do that in Shakespeare‘s day? Was it a “mutt” or was there some breed indicative of status that they used? (Probably more an indication of where my head has been this week than anything about the play. 🤷🏻‍♀️) 3d
Graywacke @TheBookHippie I‘m Jewish and really sensitive to the antisemitic stuff too. It‘s a frustrating aspect to Shakespeare. 3d
TheBookHippie @Graywacke Same. I know it it‘s coming ..but still when I see it in print it just stops me.. 3d
Graywacke @TheBookHippie it strips a lot of lightness from the lighthearted aspects of the play. I try to go with it, because there is so much charming humor here - in many different forms - with servants, between servants, without servants, insults and appeals, insightful and silly and sometimes cruel (but still funny). Speed is especially terrific. 3d
Graywacke @Lcsmcat it‘s clever how the play isn‘t dependent on what Crab does (“Ask my dog. If he say ‘Ay‘, it will. If he say ‘No‘, it will. If he shake his tail and say nothing, it will.”) 3d
vlwelser @Graywacke @TheBookHippie I also found the antisemitism off-putting. How does that pass as a joke? 3d
vlwelser Overall this continues to be pretty amusing. The word play is excellent. 3d
TheBookHippie @vlwelser It was. It is. It was and unfortunately mostly still considered acceptable. Subtle undercutting racism. 3d
TheBookHippie @vlwelser I love the word play. 3d
GingerAntics Oh my god, I love seeing early Sir Patrick Stewart plays. 💙💙💙 3d
Graywacke @vlwelser @TheBookHippie I really enjoyed this act and all the word play, and the implications of them. I thought speeds play with Valentine in scene one told is so much about who V is and how clueless he is. (And then V takes out on Thurio - that is really funny) There is just a whole lot of fun here. 3d
Graywacke @TheBookHippie i admit I still liked Lance a lot. His “sourest-natured dog that lives” as his buddy was charming to me. Then his family as a shoes and his talk with Speed…his telling Speed and P & J and then says, “Thou shalt never get such a secret from me but by a parable.” 3d
Graywacke @GingerAntics Patrick Stewart just has always looked good. I bet he was a terrific Lance. 3d
jewright This act reminded me of Romeo and Juliet. Speed‘s section of quick talking reminds me of Mercutio. It was a whole list of similes. Some of the images are the same too. He mentions school boys and books like R&J. There‘s also mention of Valentine using a ladder of cords to climb to her window just like Romeo. The cross dressing reminds me of Twelfth Night. 3d
jewright @Graywacke I loved he read a Shakespeare sonnet a day during the start of the pandemic. 3d
Graywacke @jewright thanks for highlighting the R&J comparisons. (Not to mention a prominent name and her distinct servant.) My Oxford edition constantly notes connections to other plays, especially Merchant of Venice and Loves Labours Lost (which repackages some of the dialogue) And, yes, ❤️Patrick Stewart‘s pandemic sonnet reading … I‘ll revisit that when we read the sonnets. 3d
GingerAntics @Graywacke I would do just about anything for a video. I can‘t even imagine how well he played Lance. 3d
GingerAntics @Graywacke well, I can, but you get the point. It‘s probably even better than that. I‘m not going to lie, when I imagine him playing any roll, there is always a little hint of Jean Luc Picard in there. 🤣😂🤣 I guess you never really shake your first encounter. 🤷🏼‍♀️ 3d
Graywacke @GingerAntics 🙂 But surely Jean Luc Picard could pull off Shakespeare. 3d
mollyrotondo So I don‘t always love a Shakespeare comedy but this one is highly enjoyable so far. The very first scene with Val and Speed is so funny. And then Silvia‘s whole “write me a letter to send to my love” plot was so odd yet so wonderful! And Val is like huh? 😆 And what a jerk Proteus is for totally forgetting a hot second later about Julia and going after his friend‘s girl 🤢 but it feels good to read a more “Shakespeare” like play after Pericles 3d
mollyrotondo @TheBookHippie I know the Jew line was awful. I cringe every time I read a line about Jewish people in a Shakespeare play. I love Shakespeare‘s plays so much that each time this comes up it‘s like a punch in the face. He was so smart in his writing that it‘s so frustrating that he also wrote such bigoted asinine things like this. And to write it as if it‘s funny. It‘s a dark reminder. 3d
TheBookHippie @mollyrotondo I agree 100 percent. 3d
batsy I liked the exchange between Lucetta and Julia! Lucetta is pretty great; she has lines that has her like a cross between a philosopher and jester. Also the way in which Proteus smoothly falls into self-deception wrt his actions about falling in lust with his best mate's girl was interesting to observe! 3d
merelybookish Ok! I'm caught up and am surprised at how entertaining this play is so far. Loved Speed's line about being in love with his bed. 🙂 Also bristled at the references to Jews. Also didn't like when Proteus compared Julia unfavourably to Silvia by saying she was as dark as an Ethiobe. 🙄 I like Julia's spunk and Lucetta's sense of humour. 3d
Graywacke @mollyrotondo glad your enjoying more then weird Pericles. I think Proteus may be the definition of “a hot second later” 2d
Graywacke @batsy Proteus, man. It‘s so random. Like, if he says it, it immediately becomes justified to him. Lucetta is terrific. Wish she was joining J in Milan. 2d
Graywacke @merelybookish you captured it all so well. It is, despite the bad stuff, really entertaining. 2d
GingerAntics @Graywacke oh I believe he did, when he was teaching Data to act. 😏 1d
39 likes32 comments
review
Graywacke
The Story of My Teeth | Valeria Luiselli
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Pickpick

Trying to capture how nice this physical book is in my picture, but maybe a collage would have been better.

This is not a book for everyone, but if you can pick up on the playful sense, the games with philosophy and philosophers through time, and can combine that into Luiselli‘s intimate prose…with the mixing of these tones it becomes something quite wonderful. I was thoroughly charmed, even if I didn‘t fully get it.

BarbaraBB I enjoyed this one too but definitely not as much as 1w
Graywacke @BarbaraBB I agree. But also I think this was a lot less ambitious. 1w
59 likes2 comments
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Graywacke
The Fruit of the Tree | Edith Wharton
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#whartonbuddyread
The Fruit of the Tree 1907

Our next Wharton novel. (Get this copy, W‘s own, for $3500, or maybe get a free ebook.) This is a 600 page tome, hence the schedule.

Feb 12: Book I parts I - V
Feb 19: Book I part VI to Book II part XIII
Feb 26: Book II part XIV to Book III part XX
Mar 5: Book III part XXI - XXVII
Mar 12: Book III part XXVIII to Book IV part XXXV
Mar 19: Book IV part XXXVI - XLVIII (end of the book)

Graywacke @megnews (in case you‘re interested) 2w
Lcsmcat I think I‘ll stick with the paperback copy I got from ThriftBooks. 😂 2w
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Cathythoughts Wow!! This looks great , I‘ve never heard of it. I might go for a less expensive copy though 😃 1w
Currey @Graywacke I think I will also go for the less expensive version and thank you for the slow and steady schedule. 1w
jewright I better get started now. I‘m a slow Wharton reader apparently. 1w
Graywacke @Lcsmcat @Cathythoughts @Currey appreciating your financial sanity, but still, can you help imagining it on your shelves? (Or is that just me?) 1w
Graywacke @jewright I‘m worried because I have no sense of the pace of this one. Not sure if 100 pages a week will take me 3 hours (~2-minutes a page) or five hours (3 minutes a page)… or, goodness, perhaps more. 1w
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Oh, the allure of holding a copy that Wharton held has its appeal, just not THAT much appeal. 😂 1w
40 likes9 comments
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Graywacke
The Two Gentlemen of Verona | William Shakespeare
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Let us take a moment and imagine ourselves in Renaissance Verona.

#shakespearereadalong

Act I - We meet Valentine and Proteus, each well-defined by their name. V true in love, and P ever changing. V is off to Milan. P, although no Leander, is in love with one Julia and stays to court. But dad Antonio sends P off to Milan anyway, with a day‘s notice. Also, let‘s not overlook our servants. This maybe the Bard‘s 1st act performed. Thoughts?

LitStephanie What a beautiful picture! Looking forward to joining the discussion late this afternoon. Thanks for hosting! 2w
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Liz_M I can't cite specifics, but this is already a better read than Pericles! I loved Proteus's speech at the end of 1.3, lines 79-88. 1w
Liz_M There seems to be a theme of arbitrariness. "I think him so because I think him so" (1.2.24) "For what I will, I will and there an end" (1.3.66) "O, how this spring of love resembleth The uncertain glory of an April day" (1.3.85-6) 1w
Graywacke @Liz_M !! Cool. And thanks for highlighting. 1w
Lcsmcat @Liz_M The April reference made me think of the Sonnets and the references to changeable spring. 1w
batsy I enjoyed the first act, and it surprised me because GR reviews are largely so-so; it'll be interesting to see how it develops. I also found Julia quite likeable in the first act, and her trying to piece together the letter that she tore up was probably the highlight. Her indecisiveness had a nice touch of screwball comedy. 1w
Graywacke @Liz_M I‘m with you vs. serious Pericles. This is much more playful. And cool about the lines. (It is better than P because we think it so?) 1w
Graywacke @Lcsmcat I so hope we do his sonnets this year! (edited) 1w
Graywacke @batsy I enjoyed it too. I read act 1 on Jan 1 and then again today, and the opening give and take with V & P is quite wonderful on a reread. V basically makes fun of P, by accurately describing him. I think the so-so responses might have something to do with a little awkward something in act v that certainly hasn‘t aged well. (edited) 1w
vlwelser This one is pretty fun so far. I like that it basically opens with a joke. But the whole play may have this slapstick quality to it. Because scene 2 is also quite amusing. I like the Lucetta character. I agree that we like it better (than Pericles) because we like it better, to use her reasoning style. 1w
jewright I liked it so far. It seems like another light-hearted one, but I rather enjoyed Pericles. 1w
LitStephanie @Liz_M I laughed at Lucetta's "I think him so because I think him so" too. It is true that we rely on our instincts for what we think of new acquaintances. I like that she is honest about it. 1w
LitStephanie @batsy same. I love how she calls Lucetta back after spurning the letter. So cute! I can tell already Speed is going to be fun. I liked his comeback to Proteus's sarcastic comment about his quick wit: "And yet it cannot overtake your slow purse." 1w
Graywacke @LitStephanie i love that line from Speed (and also that he never even met Julia, and was describing Lucetta.) 1w
Graywacke @vlwelser ( @LitStephanie ) Lucetta‘s logic is catching.🙂 I wonder if the whole play is like this (Like A Comedy of Errors) 1w
Graywacke @jewright Glad you‘re enjoying, and Pericles needs some appreciation (i likes parts, but some parts not so much) (edited) 1w
mollyrotondo @LitStephanie I also loved the scenes between Julia and Lucetta. Lucetta specifically knows why she doesn‘t like the other men Julia mentions, and Proteus she just instinctively knows she likes him. It just sounded like a very real conversation between two young women 😆 1w
LitStephanie Agreed, that whole scene felt very natural. I have never seen this one staged but bet this first act at least would be really funny. 1w
mollyrotondo I also found it very amusing that Proteus is so in love with Julia yet afraid to tell his father about it. So he lies and says the letter he received was from Valentine and traps himself into the very thing he didn‘t want to do. It‘s just classic Shakespeare antics 😂 1w
Graywacke @mollyrotondo @LitStephanie I was wondering at Lucetta‘s meaning. I mean was she just saying she likes him or was she maybe hinting that she liked him because he‘s bad? Regardless, it is amusing and part of me checked off the Bechtel test. 🙂 1w
mollyrotondo @Graywacke oh I was just taking it as Lucetta likes him. Period. She doesn‘t necessarily have a reason but just has a feeling about him. But I‘m not sure how the rest of the play shakes out so maybe her meaning will change for me as we continue lol. Oh gosh women always talk about men 😂 this convo doesn‘t pass Bechdel but I still I love it! Lol 1w
Liz_M @Graywacke Except to pass the Bechdel test the two (or more) women need to talk about something other than a man. 😉 1w
Graywacke @mollyrotondo @Liz_M darn it Shakespeare 💪 1w
TheBookHippie Oh I hope we do sonnets. I‘m trying to finish the 140 pages of introduction in my copy. As one of his firsts I quite like this as it seems playful and the back and forth is more fun or Pericles was really that much of a downer 😂😅. It‘s interesting that my introduction says that the intelligence of this play is quite overlooked. I‘m anxious to read on. 1w
TheBookHippie I did enjoy the line “ Fire that‘s closest kept burns most of all” Julia and Lucetta was the most fun to read. 1w
TheBookHippie @batsy I so agree! Or my rewatching of Golden Girls is bleeding into my Shakespeare ! 1w
TheBookHippie What play is next? I don‘t seem to have it anywhere. 4d
Graywacke @TheBookHippie need to confirm with @GingerAntics - but I think Coriolanus. 4d
GingerAntics @Graywacke @TheBookHippie yes to Coriolanus next. I had to go double check. The last few weeks have been CRAZY so my sense of time is wonky. I‘m leading Coriolanus, too. Thanks for making me look Dan, or we‘d all be waiting and wondering what was going on. 🤣😝🤦🏼‍♀️ 4d
GingerAntics @TheBookHippie after Coriolanus, we have 2 more plays, then the sonnets, so we will definitely get to those this year. I‘m very excited for those. 4d
TheBookHippie @GingerAntics I thought I had it written down!!! 😂😅🤦🏻‍♀️ it‘s been a bumpy start to 2022! Sonnets! Yay! 4d
GingerAntics @TheBookHippie same! Until I adjust to this new job, it‘s got me run down and sore! I got lidocaine patches for my feet to keep me going. 4d
GingerAntics @Graywacke @TheBookHippie I‘m excited for the sonnets! They‘re so fun. It‘s going to take some creativity to make them all fit into 5 or 6 weeks. 4d
GingerAntics @Graywacke @TheBookHippie whoops, just accidentally figured it out. 22 sonnets a week, we‘ll be done in 7 weeks. Yay for calculators!!! 4d
Graywacke @GingerAntics i was thinking about it quite differently. Like maybe 7 a week! (Slow and lazy☺️ but also giving us time to read them over several times ). This would mean sharing thread lead do no single person has to prompt it for too many consecutive weeks. Anyway, tossing that out here as an alternate idea. Maybe we should open a discussion? (edited) 4d
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Graywacke
The Story of My Teeth | Valeria Luiselli
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(Sharing with the cat)

I am going to recount for you the fascinating stories of these teeth, and I would urge you to buy them, take them to your homes, use them, or simply cherish them for persecula seculorum. That is, for forever. Otherwise, I continued, slightly overstating the case in a menacing tone, if these relics don‘t find owners by the end of this session, they will be sold abroad. And the last thing we need 👇👇

Graywacke … is for the little we have to be carried off by others.

I noted that this latter argument, although it wasn‘t completely valid, had begun to capture the Cardenist, socialist, national-reconstructive hearts of my audience.

Google translate :
per secula seculorum = for ever and ever.
persecula seculorum = persecutors of the ages.
2w
IuliaC The Google translation seems accurate, not the use of the expression in the quote 😁 2w
Graywacke @IuliaC I think Luiselli is having fun with language and both meanings apply. 🙂 (There seems to be a lot of word play in the novel. But, as it was written in Spanish, it‘s tricky to know what she was doing translation. But the Latin holds.) (edited) 2w
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Suet624 Wait. Is this a new one by Luiselli? 2w
Graywacke @Suet624 no, older. 2013, translated 2015. Curious what she will give us next. 2w
IuliaC @Graywacke In this case the word play is simply great👍 2w
Suet624 Me too. I can‘t wait. 2w
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blurb
Graywacke
The Story of My Teeth | Valeria Luiselli
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(My neglected desk in the background. This is my first day inside my office in 3 and a half weeks.)

So, I started yet another book. This one screams Nabokov…and Pynchon. I didn‘t expect that. But also, “Book I” (about 30 pages) is brilliant and has Luiselli‘s wonderful intimacy with the text that she seems to pull off. … I hope the rest of the book holds up.

GingerAntics This sounds intriguing. 2w
readordierachel I look forward to your thoughts on this one. It's been on my tbr since loving Lost Children Archive. 2w
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Graywacke
Madame de Treymes | Edith Wharton
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Another book started, where I‘m learning the curious comfort of “dear, good, sweet, simple, real Americans” in Paris. For #whartonbuddyread.

Suet624 Hmmmm 2w
Graywacke @Suet624 it‘s short and, so far, terrific… 🙂 2w
Suet624 So stiles I have trouble imagining that Americans were “sweet” and “dear” in Paris but maybe I‘m taking it out of context. 2w
Graywacke @Suet624 right. It‘s a curious phrasing. 2w
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Graywacke
Bend Sinister | Vladimir Nabokov
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1. Tough call for me. The stifling atmosphere and frozen setting of this one, a kind of Soviet criticism novel, left a chill. So it gets the choice today.

2. Personal - read Decameron. 🙂

3. Lazy mornings.

#wondrouswednesday
Thanks @Eggs for the tag.

Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks I love lazy mornings 🤍 2w
Eggs I crave lazy mornings 😫 2w
Graywacke @Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks I think mornings are my favorite part of the holiday breaks. @eggs I totally get that! 2w
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Graywacke
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#12Booksof2021
#December

I spent two years on a Nabokov theme, reading all of his novels, with 2021 reading his English language novels. This biography, which is really special, was so meaningful to me in that context. It was possibly my favorite book of my Nabokov theme. It‘s a great book to complete this #12Booksof2021 list.

Andrew65 Looks good. 2w
Graywacke @Andrew65 thanks so much for running this, and, impressively and kindly, staying on top of everyone‘s posts! 2w
Andrew65 @Graywacke Try my best. 😊 It has been good to review reading from last year and picking new books from others posts to read next year. 2w
49 likes3 comments
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Graywacke
House of Mirth | Edith Wharton
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#12Booksof2021
#November

I finished six books in November, all good, and I gave 5-stars to two of them. One was The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, my first by Muriel Spark. The other was this special classic, read with the #whartonbuddyread - it‘s my favorite for this month.

LitStephanie Poor Lily! 😭 I love this book, too. It is such a haunting portrayal of life for a lot of English/American women at the time caught in that special place of being too poor for independence or advantageous marriage and too high status to have job skills to feed herself. So sad/infuriating. 2w
Andrew65 An enjoyable author. 2w
Graywacke @LitStephanie yes, to all that. So true. And Lily hangs around the memory. 2w
Graywacke @Andrew65 she is! 2w
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Graywacke
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My new audio, read by the author, who was also a lead actress in Young Sherlock Holmes. This one is from the 2020 Booker longlist, but was released in the US in September (2021!). The first 30 minutes are terrific. (And it means I have seven books going at the moment. 😬🙃🙂)

Suet624 7! How can you manage? My Lyme brain would never be able to do that. 2w
Graywacke @Suet624 i‘m still working it out how. 🙂 (And I haven‘t started our next Wharton yet. That will make 8.) 2w
Ruthiella I have seven books on the go now too! Normally I juggle two-three, but I got a little overly ambitious... It‘s doable, but not optimal! 😂 2w
Graywacke @Ruthiella agree, do able - for us stubborn determined to carry on. 🙂 2w
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Graywacke
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Another books I started the year off with. This one for a year long buddy read led by @JenniferP #uwe #anniversariesbuddyread

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Graywacke
David Copperfield | Charles Dickens
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Another of those books I started Jan 1. This one for a Victorian theme on LibraryThing.

TheBookHippie Look at that cover!!! 😍 2w
RaeLovesToRead My Dad recently finished this... apparently it isn't exactly a barrel of laughs 😄 Last Charles Dickens I read was Great Expectations. 2w
Graywacke @TheBookHippie I‘ve been a little iffy on the cover. Trying to warm up to it. 2w
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Graywacke @RaeLovesToRead this is only my second Dickens. It has a lot of humor in there so far. Also supposedly a lot of autobiographical elements 2w
TheBookHippie I‘ve not seen my copy in so long I‘ve no clue what is on cover! 2w
elkeOriginal What a goofy cover! I do remember this one even improves on rereads. I think in my school career I read it 3 times - as if there weren‘t other Dickens books to assign! 2w
Graywacke @elkeOriginal see, that‘s what i was thinking. That‘s funny you were assigned it three times, but also nice that you were assigned it (well, hope so) 2w
elkeOriginal It really became a favorite! 2w
52 likes8 comments
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Graywacke
Decameron | Giovanni Boccaccio
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I‘ve started 4 books this new year, and opened the year by starting this Norton edition - an abridged translation of Decameron by Wayne Rebhorn (with context and commentary).

Leftcoastzen 👏🐶 2w
PaperbackPirate 💙🐶 2w
60 likes2 comments
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Graywacke
Paradise | Abdulrazak Gurnah
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#12Booksof2021
#October was another terrific reading month, much better than August & September. I read seven books, including a lovely reread of Romeo and Juliet. And I finally read this wonderful book by the latest Nobel Prize winner, easily one of favorite books of the year.

BarbaraBB I am going to read one of his books for #ReadingAfrica2022. Ever since you read this book I meant to read the author! 2w
Graywacke @BarbaraBB awesome. i hope you enjoy him. 2w
Andrew65 Looks good. 2w
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Graywacke
The Two Gentlemen of Verona | William Shakespeare
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In her program note for The Two Gentlemen of Verona at Stratford-upon-Avon in I970, Hilary Spurling described the play's world as one of:

“knights errant, distracted lovers, and as preposterous a band of brigands as ever strode a stage. This is an Italy of true romance, where Milan is reached from Verona by sea. …”

#Shakespearereadalong
Just a reminder. See you all next Sunday.

Lcsmcat Sounds like it will fit nicely with my Don Quixote read! 2w
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Graywacke @Lcsmcat well, actually, maybe. 🙂 2w
Graywacke (Oye - I keep losing power and it‘s not Litsy post friendly.) 2w
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I was thinking more of the knights errant than the geography, but, not knowing much about Spanish geography myself, I‘ve no idea how accurate Cervantes‘ is! 2w
vlwelser That's funny. Maybe they went by river? Or maybe Shakespeare had never been to Italy. Or looked at a map. 2w
TheBookHippie I‘m ready!!! 2w
Graywacke @Lcsmcat see i wrote that, deleted it, then posted the comment you see now, then saw both comments were posted. I‘m so confused. Anyway, I will be with you when I finally get to Cervantes. Blindly following his imaginary lead. 2w
Graywacke @vlwelser that could be his explanation. Curious that the play never says the two men are from Verona. Only the title tells us that. 2w
Lcsmcat @Graywacke May your power woes end sooner than Don Quixote‘s woes! 2w
Graywacke @TheBookHippie I‘ve already read act 1! 🤓 I‘ll have to reread before i post Sunday. @Riveted_Reader_Melissa 🙂 2w
Graywacke @Lcsmcat texas blue norther ( well, whole central part of the us, of course. But, texas is uniquely unprepared.) anyway, we have had consistent power for maybe 5 hours now. Yay. 2w
batsy @Lcsmcat I was thinking the same! 2w
batsy @Graywacke Thank you for the reminder and I hope the power issues are resolved ASAP. 2w
GingerAntics Stay warm, Dan!!! That description of the play is absolutely intriguing. 2w
50 likes17 comments
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Graywacke
The Sweetness of Water | Nathan Harris
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#12Booksof2021
#September

This was a better month than August because I finally finished three really long books and felt free to move on. (I eventually finished seven books this month.) It was a month of good, not great books. But it included this new charming oddball novel, which I really enjoyed on audio.

Andrew65 Looks great. 2w
44 likes1 comment
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Graywacke
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#12Booksof2021
#August

I‘m glad I read these, but actually neither was amazing. August was kind of a lame reading month for me, compared to the rest of the year.

Andrew65 For me August was the best reading month. 🤣 3w
Graywacke @Andrew65 we balanced the world‘s reading joy. 🙂 3w
44 likes2 comments
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Graywacke
Moon Tiger | Penelope Lively
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#12Booksof2021
#July

July was not near as good a June, but i did stumble across this audiobook and loved everything about it. I think this book was my favorite for all of 2021.

Andrew65 Penelope Lively ❤️ 3w
46 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
Graywacke
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Pickpick

Shirley Jackson was fascinating and led a much too short but very crazy life, raising four kids and supporting the family with income from stories, parenting memoirs, and deeply complex novels with underlying themes of fear and anxiety and multiple personalities - all autobiographical aspects to some degree. This biography is thorough, maybe too thorough, but covers about everything we know about her. I‘m really grateful to have listened to it.

49 likes2 stack adds
review
Graywacke
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Pickpick

The story of Pearl Tull and her three children after her husband runs off in the 1940‘s. Pearl is hard, willful, a tough mom. Her kids are each different. Tyler here is about capturing an atmosphere by capturing all the details. Maximalist, wordy, slow and yet she creates a impression. One child ponders time and how hope turns to wistful sadness. And that‘s maybe this novel. I enjoyed it.

Graywacke This was my second novel by Anne Tyler, and this was so much more interesting than my first - Redhead by the Side of the Road. 3w
Leftcoastzen I haven‘t read Redhead, I tend to like her books in her mid career like this one and 3w
Graywacke @Leftcoastzen I'm, interested in that one - Accidental Tourist. And, I think I will follow your advice, and stay mid-career. Good suggestion. 3w
45 likes3 comments
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Graywacke
Richard III | William Shakespeare
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#12Booksof2021
#June was my best month of reading. I hit a stretch where everything was terrific - all after finishing the long The Mirror & the Light by Hilary Mantel and a good audiobook on Thomas Cromwell. I read Pnin, my favorite Nabokov, The Book of Not by Tsitsi Dangarembga and Hot Milk by Deborah Levy, while listening to Begin Again, on James Baldwin. And with the #shakespearereadalong I read Richard III, now a favorite Shakespeare.

Graywacke My full June list:
Alexander's Bridge by Willa Cather
The Mirror & the Light by Hilary Mantel
Thomas Cromwell: A Revolutionary Life by Diarmaid MacCulloch 🎧
Pnin by Vladimir Nabokov
Richard III
The Book of Not by Tsitsi Dangarembga
Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own by Eddie S. Glaude jr. 🎧
Hot Milk by Deborah Levy
(edited) 3w
SRWCF Love that artwork! 3w
batsy That's a terrific reading month. 3w
See All 8 Comments
Graywacke @SRWCF i had fun searching vintage posters. ☺️ 3w
Graywacke @batsy thanks. I was in the zone. 🙂 3w
SRWCF @Graywacke makes me want to break out my Shakespeare book! 3w
Graywacke @SRWCF well - are you following #shakespearereadalong ? We start The Two Men from Verona next week.🙂 3w
SRWCF @Graywacke No, I am not following that #. Thanks for the heads up - I will definitely check it out! 3w
41 likes8 comments
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Graywacke
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#12Booksof2021
#May

I read three translations of the Canzoniere, including this one of selections from different translators. I read a bit almost every day starting Jan 1, and finally finished in May. My overall response is a little nuanced, there is a degree to which i plodded through. But it‘s, for me, my biggest reading accomplishment this year. So, Petrarch gets May.

Andrew65 Impressive 👏👏👏 3w
GingerAntics The sonnets in R&J are supposed to be Petrarchan. I think I remember you reading this back at the beginning of the year. 3w
Graywacke @GingerAntics i had a lot of fun with the Petrarch references in R&J. There are lots. That R&J meeting sonnet is really wonderful. 3w
GingerAntics @Graywacke that might be my favourite sonnet. I love how the trade off the lines. It‘s great. 3w
41 likes4 comments
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Graywacke
Bring Up the Bodies | Hilary Mantel
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#12Booksof2021
#April

I finished five books in April, including Caste (on audio) and Lolita, the main book in my Nabokov theme. Lolita is quite a novel, but still was somehow less than I expected. I think I liked this little masterpiece better.

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Graywacke
Promised Land | Barack Obama
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#12Booksof2021
#March

I finished three books in March and they were all good, but this one, read by Obama, is really special.

Andrew65 Great choice. 3w
49 likes1 comment
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Graywacke
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Writings attributed to Hermes Trismegistus, which were considered ancient Wisdom. (The writings are a little younger than most New Testament writing, but no one knew that in the 1400‘s.) Ficino translated this for the Medici‘s and came up with a Hermetic magic. Pico della Mirandola merged it into Jewish Cabalism, creating a mystic religious magic, and a pope blessed it (!) before Pico died (age 31) - our antiquarian occult foundations.

Graywacke Partially posted for you, @batsy 🙂 3w
SRWCF Wow! So cool! 3w
Graywacke @SRWCF i know right. 3w
batsy Thank you! This is super fascinating. Dense, but all kinds of wow 🙂 3w
Graywacke @batsy yeah, a bit dense throughout so far, with a whole lot of untranslated Latin. And other 1960‘s era charms, when she says things like, “I couldn‘t find anything on…”, as if she didn‘t consult anyone. Today, that would be, “there is anything available on…” 3w
40 likes5 comments
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Graywacke
Boccaccio | Thomas Goddard Bergin
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Ok, seriously, that‘s your author photo?

Also in this book are two light random references to Nazi Germany. How one historical figure is the subject of Hitler‘s favorite opera (by Wagner!); and he uses the term “Drang nach Westen” - which a play on a German nationalist term. So am I reading a quiet angry nazi? Chapter 1 is entertaining, if dated. It‘s a summary of the 14th century. Also there aren‘t many options on the life of Boccaccio.

Graywacke For what it‘s worth, in my quick online search I found no references associating Bergin with anything unpleasant. He was a significant 20th-century scholar of early Italian literature. 3w
BarbaraBB Weird picture. 3w
rabbitprincess His photo has a “Churchill‘s portrait by Yousuf Karsh” vibe for sure 😆 3w
See All 8 Comments
Graywacke @rabbitprincess he does! 😂 @BarbaraBB - it‘s so weird to me. I keep checking again to see if I missed something. 3w
BarbaraBB I would never have approved that picture if I were the author! 3w
Graywacke @BarbaraBB in his defense, they don‘t always get to approve it. But - he looks so proud of himself… 3w
arubabookwoman Have you read The Decameron? It's on my list, maybe even for this year (2022 I mean). 3w
Graywacke @arubabookwoman Boccaccio is one of my 2022 projects. (But the copy I bought is an abridged translation… Rebhorn. ) 3w
41 likes8 comments
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Graywacke
Nervous Conditions | Tsitsi Dangarembga
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#12Booksof2021
#February

I only finished three books in February, but this is easily one of the best I read all year - cultural clashes in 1960‘s Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe)

@Andrew65

Andrew65 Sounds good reading. 4w
Ruthiella This is definitely on my list! 3w
Centique I loved this too 🙌 2w
See All 6 Comments
Graywacke @Andrew65 definitely. @Ruthiella oh, hope you enjoy! @Centique 👍 Have you read the sequels? 2w
Centique @Graywacke I‘ve read number 2 which was excellent I thought and need to get to number 3. 2w
Graywacke @Centique i loved The Book of Not. The third, The Mournable Body, is a difficult read. Powerful but very hard to watch, so to speak.. 2w
47 likes6 comments
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Graywacke
Wolf Hall | Hilary Mantel
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#12Booksof2021
#January

I read some other good books in January, including a biography, Petrarch: Everywhere a Wanderer by Christopher S. Celenza, and a terrific novel, Real Life by Brandon Taylor. But also I reread Wolf Hall.

thanks @Andrew65 for kicking this off.

Andrew65 A great book. 4w
58 likes1 comment
review
Graywacke
Strong Opinions | Vladimir Nabokov
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Panpan

I got a 100 pages in. This is a series of interviews. In a nutshell, interviewer is trying to understand VN and sometimes asking really considerate thoughtful questions, and VN then proceeds to not answer - dodging, being clever, changing the topic. It‘s really irritating. I can‘t…

SRWCF Oh, buy you CAN! 😄😄😄 4w
Graywacke @SRWCF no ☹️… 😁☺️ 4w
SRWCF @Graywacke 🤣🤣🤣 4w
batsy 😂😂 4w
Graywacke @batsy ☺️ 3w
40 likes5 comments
review
Graywacke
A Town Called Solace | Mary Lawson
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Pickpick

This is a nice novel. It‘s clean, embracing a 1970‘s Northern Ontario isolated from the outside world, but not isolated enough. Lawson is maybe looking for peace and restoration without denying reality…but she is still holding reality away at arm‘s length.

I‘m not sure it belongs on the 2021 Booker longlist, but I enjoyed, snapped through it, really.

Amiable I read this a few months ago and really enjoyed it, too. 4w
Tamra I‘m glad you enjoyed it and I hope you try another! 4w
43 likes2 comments
review
Graywacke
Look at the Harlequins! | Vladimir Nabokov
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Mehso-so

This was a tough read. It seemed clear until I realized I was getting lost. And most of it is a narrator talking crazy, which gets tiresome. There is complexity and it calms down in the last 100 pages. But, i was happy to be done.

This was his 17th and last novel and I have now read them all, plus a novella, a kind of autobiography, a small biography and a longer one of his wife - maybe my favorite of all this. Anyway, closing this chapter.

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Graywacke
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While Pearl Tull was dying, a funny thought occurred to her. It twitched her lips and rustled her breath, and she felt her son lean forward from where he kept watch by her bed. “Get …” she told him. “You should have got …”

#FirstLineFridays
@ShyBookOwl

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Graywacke
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I read this silly Anna Tyler novel earlier this year because it was on the 2020 Booker longlist, and it really turned me off from trying another novel by her. Tonight I opened this one, from 1982, and there is a whole lot of interesting stuff going on in the first few pages. Completely different. I‘m intrigued by Pearl Hull, anyway.

Cathythoughts I‘ve read some of her books … I like her , I might give this one a try 👍🏻❤️ 4w
Ruthiella Many think Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant is her best. My favorite is The Amateur Marriage. (edited) 4w
Blaire I‘ve really enjoyed many of her books - my favorite is Back When We We‘re Grown Ups. 4w
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Graywacke @Cathythoughts can‘t recommend this one yet. I‘ve only read 14 pages. 🙂 But I‘ll post a follow up. 4w
Graywacke @Ruthiella had no idea this was considered her best. Noting The Amateur Marriage. 4w
Graywacke @Blaire thanks. Noting Back When We Were Grownups. 4w
47 likes6 comments
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Graywacke
A Town Called Solace | Mary Lawson
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Still working through the Booker longlist and picked this up yesterday, trying to jog myself into a better reading place. It‘s seemed to work. Reads simple, but I‘m enjoying it and it‘s peek into 1972 small town Ontario.

batsy 🐶😍 1mo
Tamra I fell in love with Lawson and have read everything! 👍🏾 1mo
CoffeeNBooks Awww... sweet pup! 1mo
See All 15 Comments
Suet624 That‘s quite the goal! 1mo
Graywacke @batsy @CoffeeNBooks Pepper is flattered, and now patrolling the front for delivery people to scare away. 1mo
Graywacke @Tamra my first Lawson. Some readers have said her other books are better than this. What do you think? (edited) 1mo
Graywacke @Suet624 it‘s my 3rd years trying to read the list - except that I mostly use audio. This year I convinced myself to read the shortest six. (2019 was fantastic, 2020 long and dull, 2021 so far … ok. Not enough of author-having-fun stuff.) 1mo
Suet624 Yeah, I feel like a lot of authors that I‘ve read this year are struggling. Not much joy in Mudville. 1mo
Cathythoughts I loved this one 👍🏻 4w
Graywacke @Cathythoughts I‘m enjoying. I might just finish today (if my body lets me after getting my booster yesterday evening) 4w
Cathythoughts Oooh that booster really hit my son hard too … rest up & take it easy X 4w
Graywacke @Suet624 i wonder on mudville. Part of me thinks that it takes a while before an author can manage fun and good meaningful writing. Whereas the Booker team may feel some pressure to make discoveries, and avoid promoting already big sellers, hence favoring authors who haven‘t figured that out yet. Or maybe it‘s just covid… 4w
Graywacke @Cathythoughts thanks. 🤒 4w
Tamra @Graywacke I enjoyed them all, but I loved this one. The setting and characters were rich and really engaging for me. 4w
Graywacke @Tamra thank you. Noting! 4w
55 likes15 comments
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Graywacke
Look at the Harlequins! | Vladimir Nabokov
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Struggling with this book, but it‘s nice to have the day off and be lazy with a sleepy kitty.

review
Graywacke
Pericles | William Shakespeare
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Mehso-so

Pericles travails. Wandering, finding, losing and finding again his daughter and wife. So. It‘s not in the First Folio. It has some second rate poetry that is claimed to be by another author, not Shakespeare, and it has a ridiculous ending. Also…there might be an incestual theme running quietly throughout it. So, um, not a favorite. But it had its moments and curiosities and the #shakespearereadalong always makes this fun.

merelybookish The alarm in Marina's face here seems fitting. Great review! Not my favourite either but you seem to have more generosity for it than I do. 1mo
Graywacke @merelybookish “more generosity” 🙂probably I do. I liked act iii, and was amused by act iv. And I liked learning about the sources and that one odd theme. 1mo
batsy Nice review! You've captured my general feelings of ambivalence about this. It's got some great stuff in it but the overall effect is a headscratcher 😅 1mo
37 likes3 comments
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Graywacke
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I‘ve wanted to read this for years. Finally started (and the cat approves)

GingerAntics Well, if the cat approves, you‘ve got a winner there. 1mo
Lcsmcat Cat approval is a necessary thing. 😺 1mo
batsy This sounds really fascinating. 1mo
See All 14 Comments
Graywacke @GingerAntics @Lcsmcat happy 🐈‍⬛ always a priority. 1mo
Graywacke @batsy it‘s a kind of classic (for the history of occult curious - as it fits into the broader history of science, philosophy, religion, literature.) she, Yates, is giving me a rundown, with quotes, of the Pimander section, the first part of the Corpus Hermeticus - and I‘m thinking not - this is crazy, but more like - I kind of get the appeal. 🙂 1mo
batsy That really sounds like something I'd like! 1mo
Graywacke @batsy you really might, if it‘s as good as I‘m hoping. Maybe I‘ll drop a post here or there, so you can see what you think. 🙂 1mo
SRWCF When I lived in Italy years ago, I worked on a street named Via Giordano Bruno! 1mo
Graywacke @SRWCF cool. What city? 1mo
SRWCF @Graywacke Genoa. 4w
Graywacke @SRWCF Genoa? The city didn‘t make his Wikipedia page. 🙂 Sounds like a wonderful place to live, though. 4w
SRWCF @Graywacke It's a nice port city. Right on the Italian Riviera. 4w
Graywacke @SRWCF i‘m, just for a moment, going to, briefly, swoon. Pardon. 4w
SRWCF @Graywacke * discreetly passes smelling salts * 4w
41 likes14 comments
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Graywacke
The Year in Review | Freedom Forum Media Studies Center
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#Top21in21 #Top21of21

Thanks for the tag @batsy Inviting/encouraging everyone tagged or otherwise reading this to join, if you like.

The bow-tie is Pnin and top middle is The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. (Reminder - on your smart phone you can do a screen capture and zoom to read titles.)

Ruthiella We both have the Ishiguro on our 2021 list. I read the Mantel novels earlier, but she is genius. 1mo
Graywacke @Ruthiella I really enjoyed Klara. And agree about Mantel. 👍 1mo
Suet624 I can‘t believe how quickly everyone was able to pull their lists together!! Thanks for the tag. 😄 1mo
See All 45 Comments
Nute Fantastic reading this year! So happy to see Klara and the Sun…I don‘t think that it will surface on many lists. I enjoyed it. I am discovering so many new books because of everyone‘s choices. Reading through these posts is like a Saturday morning heavenly literary smorgasbord from some of my most favorite people on the planet! Such a delight!💕 1mo
Graywacke @Suet624 Saturday 🙂 And I cheated a little, using my LibraryThing library tags to put my list together. The picture is an LibraryThing screen capture 1mo
Graywacke @Nute agree, a fun morning. Lots of titles rattling around my head now. 1mo
merelybookish Thanks for the tag! I'm impressed that Romeo & Juliet made it! 🙂 1mo
GingerAntics Richard III was a good read. I think I dug into that one more than any other play so far. It was so fascinating. That would have to be on my list as well. I‘m having a hard time thinking of 21 books I absolutely loved this year. It was a slower year than normal and I had a lot of bails. 1mo
LeahBergen I see many favourites here! 1mo
Graywacke @merelybookish I enjoyed R&J so much. (Pericles did not make the cut. 😂 We can discuss tomorrow) 1mo
Graywacke @GingerAntics well, to be fair, i did not absolutely love all 21 here. RIII maybe. 1mo
Graywacke @LeahBergen 👍 🙂 1mo
GingerAntics @Graywacke okay, so you just sort of winged in. That‘s helpful. I agree that Pericles was a real disappointment. 1mo
Freespirit Love seeing everyone‘s top reads! 1mo
merelybookish I'd be surprised if Pericles made anyone's best list. 1mo
Graywacke @GingerAntics not winged. These are 21 favorites for the year. Just that I didn‘t read 21 amazing books. All these are really good though…and some others too. 1mo
Graywacke @Freespirit ditto! Thanks. 1mo
Graywacke @merelybookish right. But John Gower‘s work, one of the Bard‘s sources, seems actually pretty awesome. Chaucer era English poetry. 1mo
GingerAntics @Graywacke winged wasn‘t the right word, but I get what you were saying. I don‘t think I read 21 great books either. I think I found it hard enough to pick 12 last year. 1mo
BarbaraBB What a wonderful list! 1mo
KarenUK Fantastic list! Loved Hot milk… was on my best of list last year…. 1mo
Graywacke @BarbaraBB you‘re so sweet. You also have a pretty fantastic list - (and a bigger and very rich pool to choose from. You read so much great stuff.) 1mo
Graywacke @KarenUK thanks! I discovered Levy in the 2019 Booker longlist with The Man Who Saw Everything. Now I‘m trying to read more. Hot Milk is such a quirky terrific thing. 1mo
KarenUK @Graywacke I read two of her memoirs this year, and both are on my top 21 list! 1mo
Chelsea.Poole I‘m going to try Klara in the new year, I think. Thanks for sharing your list! 1mo
Graywacke @KarenUK those are both going on the list. 1mo
Graywacke @KarenUK the list - being my list of stuff i want to read after scanning Litsy or other book inspirations. 1mo
Graywacke @Chelsea.Poole thanks. Klara is fun voice to spend time with. Hope you enjoy. (If you like audio, it‘s a good option) 1mo
sarahbarnes I love Levy! And just got Fortune Men from the library today. Great list! 1mo
batsy A fantastic list. Hot Milk, R&J, House of Mirth, Wolf Hall, Lolita 👌🏽 And the rest I'm looking forward to discovering 🙂 1mo
staci.reads Thanks for the tag! I'll definitely do mine, but probably next week. I'm taking some vacation days around Christmas and hope to get some more reading in 🤗 Never know...could have some new favorites 😁 1mo
BiblioLitten I‘m looking forward to Moon Tiger 1mo
CarolynM Some great books there! Hot Milk and Moon Tiger are both favourites and I love the Mantels - I still can't bring myself to read the last one, I like Him too much 1mo
Graywacke @sarahbarnes thanks! Enjoy TFM (for what it‘s worth, it evolves a lot from beginning to end) 1mo
Graywacke @batsy you read a lot of the best ones. 🙂 (Just need to add Gurnah and Nervous Conditions) 1mo
Graywacke @staci.reads right, still two weeks left. Enjoy that vacation. And look forward to your list (but no pressure ☺️) 1mo
Graywacke @BiblioLitten i loved Moon Tiger. Hope you enjoy. 1mo
Graywacke @CarolynM Another Levy and Moon Tiger fan 🙌 That last Cromwell, well, also it‘s a bit long and slow. I‘m glad I read it though. 1mo
stretchkev Klara and the Sun is hitting a lot of top of the year lists, certainly going to take a hard look after making your top of the year. Still afraid of Mantel, so many folks love it, but it is such a big series. 1mo
Graywacke @stretchkev Not sure how you might take to Klara. It might be lighter than you expect, some deeper stuff embedded. It's enjoyable. As for Mantel, she's likely to draw you in if you try Wolf Hall. Of course, I'm happy to recommend both. 🙂 1mo
LitStephanie OMG thanks for the zoom view tip. I can't believe I never thought of that. Thanks for the tag, I am going to do a post! Read a lot this year, partly because of Litsy. 1mo
Graywacke @LitStephanie someone ( @Lcsmcat ) had to tell me about the zoom trick. 🙂Look forward to your list! 1mo
Cinfhen I really want to pick up this book in 2022 1mo
Graywacke @Cinfhen it‘s a great book and evolving one. It begins and ends on very different notes. (and there‘s an immigrant Jewish element that is sad, but that I still found interesting) 1mo
Cinfhen Your description makes me want to read it even more. Thanks 😊 1mo
65 likes45 comments
quote
Graywacke
Look at the Harlequins! | Vladimir Nabokov
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“I met the first of my three or four successive wives in somewhat odd circumstances, the development of which resembled a clumsy conspiracy, with nonsensical details and a main plotter who knew nothing of its real object but insisted on making inept moves that seemed to preclude the slightest possibility of success.”

Something to chew a few times before the implications of that sentence all come out.
#FirstLineFridays
@ShyBookOwl

DivineDiana 😳 1mo
Leftcoastzen 😂that darned Nabokov! 1mo
bnp Definitely hooks me! 1mo
36 likes3 comments
blurb
Graywacke
Look at the Harlequins! | Vladimir Nabokov
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I‘m not enjoying Nabokov‘s book of interviews, Strong Opinions. So I picked this up, his last novel. I really enjoyed the first 20 pages.

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Graywacke
Strong Opinions | Vladimir Nabokov
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(In the car waiting waiting for the end of Hebrew school.)

My next book, a collection of interviews of a known-to-be-unreliable author, selected by the same author. Well, will see what‘s here. I‘m attempting to cram a few last Nabokovs into December. In January I‘ll move to a new theme (Boccaccio and Robert Musil are my planned 2022 themes)

vlwelser Have you been reading Nabokov all year? I don't know if I could take that much Nabokov. 1mo
Graywacke @vlwelser two years! 2020 was on his 12 Russian novels (in translation) And this year his English novels. Well, I read other stuff too. (edited) 1mo
36 likes2 comments
review
Graywacke
Transparent Things | Vladimir Nabokov
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Pickpick

Switzerland. Or blind Americans in Switzerland. Or just blind readers. VN tells us on page one: “Novices must learn to skim over matter if they want matter to stay at the exact level of the moment.” Insulted and confused, hopefully playfully (?), we must press on another 25 pages before sense begins to be made of Hugh Person‘s love of the unlovable Armande. A confusing thought-provoking sad and playful late novella. ymmv, I think.

review
Graywacke
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Pickpick

Schiff is at her best writing slow and immersive, and with a subject complicated and fascinating enough to adapt to that. She pulled it off with Benjamin Franklin in Paris, and she does it here with the strikingly intelligent, proudly Jewish, fiercely humble partner of Vladimir Nabokov. She was his muse, caretaker, typist and his first and best reader. A really beautiful book.

vivastory When I saw Schiff in '16 she was speaking mostly about her book on the Salem witch trials, but she also spoke about her other works, including this one. It sounded fascinating! 1mo
Graywacke @vivastory cool that you got to see her speak and glad she was still talking about this one ~17 years after she originally published it (1999) 1mo
batsy Lovely review. This sounds like it would be fascinating just to learn about their relationship, even I've only read just the one Nabokov. 1mo
Graywacke @batsy thanks. I think it‘s a biography that works even if you haven‘t read anything by him. (Of course it might nudge you to read something…like Pnin…everyone should read Pnin 🙂) 1mo
38 likes1 stack add4 comments
blurb
Graywacke
Transparent Things | Vladimir Nabokov
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My next book. It‘s only 104 pages. Hopefully I‘ll figure what that this is about before I read them all.

Leftcoastzen It‘s been a long while but ❤️❤️ 1mo
Graywacke @Leftcoastzen oh, good. I‘m completely bewildered so far. 1mo
LitStephanie I know nothing about this author but that gorgeous bright eyed tuxedo looks ready to take on that book! 1mo
batsy The cat seems a wee bit alarmed that it's Nabokov? 😆😻 1mo
Graywacke @LitStephanie @batsy 🙂 he was just chilling when i put the book next to him. But then he gave that big-glossy-eyed surprise look just as I was about to click the shot. (edited) 1mo
45 likes5 comments
quote
Graywacke
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“he believed God looks after entomologists as he does drunkards.”

Flaneurette love this quote! stacked

1mo
Graywacke @Flaneurette the whole paragraph is entertaining, but that one line really charmed me. This book is terrific. So you know, it‘s slow, but a really nice kind of slow. A lets-spend-some-time-with-these-people slow. 1mo
32 likes1 stack add2 comments
blurb
Graywacke
The Two Gentlemen of Verona | William Shakespeare
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Two Gentlemen of Verona, a deranged-plot comedy, is maybe Shakespeare‘s earliest play. It has the smallest cast of any of his plays, and maybe the most influential unspoken role - by Crab the dog. Oh, more crossdressing too. See you in January.

#Shakespearereadalong
Act I - Jan 9
Act II - Jan 16
Act III - Jan 23
Act IV - Jan 30
Act V - Feb 6

Graywacke I found the image on Etsy. So, not to be neglectful, you can get your own popsicle puppets here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/962283052/two-gentlemen-of-verona-shakespeare 1mo
IamIamIam 👏👏👏👏 1mo
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erzascarletbookgasm I‘m very curious about Crab the dog. Looking forward 1mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Sounds perfect 👍 1mo
TheBookHippie Love the picture!!!! And yay!!!! 1mo
TheBookHippie Popsicle puppet is now added to my regular language use. 1mo
Graywacke @IamIamIam @erzascarletbookgasm @Riveted_Reader_Melissa @TheBookHippie 🙂 : @erzascarletbookgasm I‘m curious about the dog too. : @TheBookHippie an important object, the popsicle puppet! 1mo
Lcsmcat Now the question is will each act be represented by popsicle puppets? 1mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat maybe I should buy the set and reenact for posts… 🙂 (I am visual art incompetent. Not making my own) (edited) 1mo
jewright I‘m intrigued! I haven‘t read this one before. (edited) 1mo
GingerAntics I do love a good Shakespeare crossdressing incident. lol 1mo
batsy What @erzascarletbookgasm said! 🐶 Also, how nice is it to ring in the new year with a fresh new Shakespeare? I love this group. 1mo
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