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Modern Classics Goodbye to All That
Modern Classics Goodbye to All That | Robert Graves
20 posts | 13 read | 12 to read
An autobiographical work that describes firsthand the great tectonic shifts in English society following the First World War, Robert Graves's Goodbye to All That is a matchless evocation of the Great War's haunting legacy, published in Penguin Modern Classics. In 1929 Robert Graves went to live abroad permanently, vowing 'never to make England my home again'. This is his superb account of his life up until that 'bitter leave-taking': from his childhood and desperately unhappy school days at Charterhouse, to his time serving as a young officer in the First World War that was to haunt him throughout his life. It also contains memorable encounters with fellow writers and poets, including Siegfried Sassoon and Thomas Hardy, and covers his increasingly unhappy marriage to Nancy Nicholson. Goodbye to All That, with its vivid, harrowing descriptions of the Western Front, is a classic war document, and also has immense value as one of the most candid self-portraits of an artist ever written. Robert Ranke Graves (1895-1985) was a British poet, novelist, and critic. He is best known for the historical novel I, Claudius and the critical study of myth and poetry The White Goddess. His autobiography, Goodbye to All That, was published in 1929, quickly establishing itself as a modern classic. Graves also translated Apuleius, Lucan and Suetonius for the Penguin Classics, and compiled the first modern dictionary of Greek Mythology, The Greek Myths. His translation of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (with Omar Ali-Shah) is also published in Penguin Classics. If you enjoyed Goodbye to All That, you might like Ford Madox Ford's Parade's End, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'His wonderful autobiography' Jeremy Paxman, Daily Mail"
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CarolynM
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#keeplitsyactive #historybooks

I've always been fascinated by stories of the First World War both fiction and nonfiction.

ljuliel Thank you for the post. Very nice ! I‘ve only read one book about WW 1. It was fiction but very good. (edited) 1mo
Crimson613 Oh man I've been meaning to read some of these!! Great picks :D 1mo
CarolynM @Crimson613 Thanks. I would recommend them all🙂 1mo
52 likes3 comments
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KimHM
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Subtle humor 😍

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KimHM
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When The Dark Valley gets too heavy, I switch to Mr. Graves.

Gezemice Love Graves but have not yet read this. 2y
KimHM Be sure to get the 1929 original edition, before he "tidied it up" @Gezemice . 2y
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Verity
Goodbye to All That | Robert Graves, Ned Halley
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Some picks for #inmemoriam for #MayBookFlowers. It's a bank holiday here, but we don't have #memorialday our day for remembering service men is Remembrance Day/Sunday. But I have taken that as my inspiration though - but particularly World War One/the Great War. So here we have 2 books by authors who were there, 2 about being there and two about the ramifications afterwards.

Lizpixie The Great War was a cataclysmic event that not everyone recovered from. It wasn't just the deaths, it was the shell shock & mental issues, the horrific injuries including loss of limbs, burns & lung damage from mustard gas & then there was the deaths from Spanish influenza that started on the battlefields and was carried home by thousands of soldiers. Nearly a whole generation was lost in that five year period. #lestweforget 3y
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JanuarieTimewalker13
Good-bye to All That | Robert Graves
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"In this soldier's story, first published in 1929, poet Robert Graves traces the monumental loss of innocence that occurred as a result of World War I."
#inmemorium I started this book several years ago, but I don't think I was ready for it. I definitely would like to read it for Memorial Day 2018.

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cleoh
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Panpan

I likely wouldn't have finished this if I hadn't had to read it for class. I'm not on for WWI memoirs, and this one had too much information packed into it. I understand the significance of Robert Graves, and the importance of his writing, especially through the lens of breaking barriers talking about the war, but this didn't capture my fancy unfortunately. ⭐️⭐️ #readingforfunmmd #genreiusuallyavoid #LitsyAtoZauthor @BookishMarginalia

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jdtchicago
Goodbye to All That | Robert Graves, Ned Halley

Cuinchy bred rats. They came up from the canal, fed on the plentiful corpses, and multiplied exceedingly. While I stayed here with the Welsh, a new officer joined the company... When he turned in that night, he heard a scuffling, shone his torch on the bed, and found two rats on his blanket tussling for the possession of a severed hand.

Hobbinol I think I would never fall asleep again!🐭 3y
21 likes1 comment
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Jessicav
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I always leave my books as the last things to pack up when moving, but it's time. This is the last bunch of books to go. Goodnight books. See you in a month or two. 😩

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Sparkin
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Tough start (schooldays), gritty and more interesting middle (WW1), lighter ending (Egypt). A Bookclub book. Nearly didn't persevere with it. Glad I did though. Not strikingly obvious that it's written by a poet. Natch.

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Sparkin
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Rather sad.

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Sparkin

Rather sad.

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Sparkin
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This isn't a book with lots of laughs but I did lol a bit at this rendition of #Macbeth!

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Sparkin
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Sad that the women didn't get the upper hand :(

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Sparkin

A shame that this didn't come about.

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Sparkin
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It's not what you know etc etc

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Sparkin
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New word for me, describing John Brown, Queen Victoria's ghillie. #vocab #vocabulary

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Sparkin
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Didn't know there was rationing in WW1.

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Sparkin
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Eek!

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Sparkin
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Must look up Isaac Rosenberg and Charles Sorley (poets) as I've only heard of Wilfred Owen.

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Sparkin
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Eewww!

BookBabe 😱 3y
1 like1 comment