Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
Indian No More
Indian No More | Traci Sorell, Charlene Willing McManis
4 posts | 7 read | 8 to read
When Regina's Umpqua tribe is legally terminated and her family must relocate from Oregon to Los Angeles, she goes on a quest to understand her identity as an Indian despite being so far from home.
Amazon Indiebound Barnes and Noble WorldCat Goodreads LibraryThing
Pick icon
100%
review
Zoe-h
Indian No More | Traci Sorell, Charlene Willing McManis
post image
Pickpick

I‘ve never read a book that was started by one author who passed during the process of writing it and then finished by another. But now that I have, I can‘t help but wonder if the author would have enjoyed what became of her book. All I do know, though, is that I enjoyed it. Native American history pass The Trail of Tears is not taught enough in schools. There need to be more books like this to educate those who are oblivious to ⬇️

Zoe-h ⬆️ blatant racism in the US. 5⭐️ 3mo
megnews I found this one really interesting. I didn‘t realize it was finished by someone else. I read one other book like that 3mo
mandarchy @megnews and @Zoe-h I did not know this about either book. Totally fascinating. Indian no more was just gifted to my library. Now I'm more curious. 2mo
12 likes3 comments
review
megnews
Indian No More | Traci Sorell, Charlene Willing McManis
post image
Pickpick

Follow Regina as her tribe is disbanded and she moves from Oregon to Los Angeles, trying to hold fast to her culture. As an adult, you will be angry at the lies told by the US govt to disband the Umpqua tribe in Oregon. As a child, you will learn some untaught US history and more. I would recommend this for classrooms.

#DoubleSpin #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

TheAromaofBooks Great progress!! 7mo
50 likes2 stack adds1 comment
review
BookInMyHands
Indian No More | Traci Sorell, Charlene Willing McManis
post image
Pickpick

I live on Kalapuya land, a tribe incorporated into the Grand Ronde confederation. A few years ago we attended the Restoration ceremony, a commemoration of when the US government restored some of the tribes‘ land after the 1956 Indian Relocation Act that stole the land and attempted assimilation.

This is an important story- a look at one family‘s struggle to live between two cultures, and what it means to be Indian.

#readingauthorsofcolor2020

61 likes4 stack adds