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Brilliant Abyss: Exploring the Majestic Hidden Life of the Deep Ocean, and the Looming Threat That Imperils It
Brilliant Abyss: Exploring the Majestic Hidden Life of the Deep Ocean, and the Looming Threat That Imperils It | Helen Scales
15 posts | 6 read | 1 reading | 17 to read
"The oceans have always shaped human lives," writes marine biologist Helen Scales in her vibrant new book The Brilliant Abyss, but the surface and the very edges have so far mattered the most. "However, one way or another, the future ocean is the deep ocean." A golden era of deep-sea discovery is underway. Revolutionary studies in the deep are rewriting the very notion of life on Earth and the rules of what is possible. In the process, the abyss is being revealed as perhaps the most amazing part of our planet, with a topography even more varied and extreme than its Earthbound counterpart. Teeming with unsuspected life, an extraordinary interconnected ecosystem deep below the waves has a huge effect on our daily lives, influencing climate and weather systems, with the potential for much more--good or bad depending on how it is exploited. Currently the fantastic creatures that live in the deep--many of them incandescent in a world without light--and its formations capture and trap vast quantities of carbon that would otherwise poison our atmosphere; and novel bacteria as yet undiscovered hold the promise of potent new medicines. Yet the deep also holds huge mineral riches lusted after by many nations and corporations; mining them could ultimately devastate the planet, compounded by the deepening impacts of ubiquitous pollutants and rampant overfishing. Eloquently and passionately, Helen Scales brings to life the majesty and mystery of an alien realm that nonetheless sustains us, while urgently making clear the price we could pay if it is further disrupted. The Brilliant Abyss is at once a revelation and a clarion call to preserve this vast unseen world.
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Hooked_on_books
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Pickpick

Helen Scales is a marine biologist who reveals the denizens of the deepest oceans in this marvelous book. She sucks you in with engaging writing about fascinating creatures, then reminds you of the importance of protecting rather than exploiting these deep oceans and their marvelous life forms. Highly recommend.

Graywacke Sounds terrific. (And nice cover) 6mo
shanaqui Hmm, I think I tried one of her books before and wanted to like it, but found it a bit dry... or maybe it was just the wrong time! I should look at this. 6mo
Hooked_on_books @shanaqui The first chapter here was a little dry, but then it breaks out and it‘s just fascinating. 6mo
iread2much Oooo, looks good! 6mo
54 likes8 stack adds4 comments
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MerlinTheSlightlyAwkward
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Anyone else hooked by an audiobook when it‘s read by the author? This is a hot contender for best random-stack read/listen of the year.

#ocean #nonfiction #sea #animals #climatechange #science #womenofscience #helenscales

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SpaceCowboyBooks
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Today's reading

42 likes2 stack adds
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Lindy
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I‘ve got another book tube video up, talking about physio, a new puppy and seven books. Meanwhile, Frida the cat makes herself comfortable in front of the camera. https://youtu.be/Z3hteMLwM6s

LeahBergen A new puppy, you say? 😮 12mo
Cathythoughts A new puppy 🥰 12mo
Lindy @LeahBergen @Cathythoughts Did you see her little face in the video? She‘s only 5 weeks old, so we won‘t have her until mid-March. 12mo
LeahBergen @Lindy Isn‘t it hard to wait? We visited Johnny when he was still with his Mom and then the breeder kept sending me photos and video as he grew. She started calling him by his name early, too. ❤️ 12mo
Lindy @LeahBergen We see daily photos and videos. Puppies are so adorable! 12mo
47 likes5 comments
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Lindy
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The first part of this audiobook, read by the author, is about the amazing creatures that live in the deepest part of our watery planet. New discoveries are made on each research trip. Then she goes on to talk about plans to harvest deep sea fish (for fish meal, mostly used for pet food) and to mine the seabed for minerals; and how devastating that will likely be—to all life, not just ocean life. Informative, important… and depressing.

sarahbarnes Pet food? Really?? 12mo
39 likes1 stack add1 comment
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Lindy
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Various deep sea fish are among the blackest in the world [and] have around the same reflectance as the human-engineered material called Vantablack.

(Image from internet)

DrexEdit 😲 I need to get my hands on this book. STAT! 12mo
Lindy @DrexEdit It makes a great follow-up to my recent reread of Rachel Carson‘s book about sealife because Helen Scales is writing about new discoveries. 12mo
DrexEdit VERY cool! I currently have Rachel Carson's book on sea life checked out of the library. This is fortuitous reading synchronicity! 👍 12mo
Lindy @DrexEdit 😁🐳🦐🐬🦑🐠🐙🐡🦀🌊 12mo
31 likes4 comments
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Lindy
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The formation of abyssal nodules is one of the slowest known geological processes. It takes 10 million years for a nodule to grow from the size of a pea to a golf ball.

DrexEdit That wikipedia entry brings all kinds of bad visions of harvesting things on the ocean floor to mind! 😨 12mo
Lindy @DrexEdit Indeed! A test was done to see how well the deep seabed life would recover if it was mined. 30 years later, that test patch has shown no life recovery at all. Not to mention the disturbed sediment from proposed mining that would affect sea life closer to the surface. 12mo
28 likes2 comments
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Lindy
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...the octopus had eaten the most nutritious parts, the stomach and gonads, but had held on to the remaining stinging tentacles, perhaps to use as a weapon.
(internet photo)

DrexEdit 💜 🐙 12mo
39 likes1 stack add1 comment
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Lindy
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“Tissues made of jelly or gelatine, a thin mix of water & the protein collagen, constitute a simple way of making a body. It's efficient to operate because it floats & comes with a low metabolic cost. Jelly-based creatures take an energy-saving approach to life, cutting their need to feed & raising their chances of survival in the hungry expanses of the deep.”

Lindy “Some animals are so dainty that the nearby swish a a fish's tail is enough to make them fall apart.“ 12mo
Lindy @DrexEdit A jelly cam! Thanks for the link. 😊 12mo
37 likes2 stack adds3 comments
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Vansa
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Beautiful and immersive. Full review at
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/4268094359

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Vansa
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(2/2)

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Vansa
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This is SUCH beautiful writing (1/2)

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ozma.of.oz
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Helen Scales is a trained marine biologist writing on the wonders of the deepest parts of our oceans, the industrialization that threatens them, and what we can do to protect the last unexplored places on our planet.

This has a ton of info! Like, so much, it read like a textbook. But everything was helpfully explained in footnotes, and there was a personal note as Scales speaks about her own experiences. Made me want to research more. 🌕🌕🌕🌕🌑

62 likes1 stack add
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ozma.of.oz
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Getting some reading done while I wait for the surprise flat tire to get repaired. 😂

jdiehr Happy Monday 2y
QuietlyLaura Surprise flat tires suck. At least you can read while waiting! ☺️ 2y
Ruthiella Ugh! Hope the rest of your day is better! 2y
65 likes1 stack add3 comments
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ozma.of.oz
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I went grocery shopping this morning, because there is literally no one there on a Tuesday morning.

And the bakery in the back had these amazing honey cream cookies stocked! They haven‘t had them for two years! 😭😭

I bought two boxes. Now, to make them last. 😅

Aims42 Yum!!! Enjoy your sweet treats, they wouldn‘t last long in my house either 😆👍🏻 2y
69 likes1 comment