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Meet the Frugalwoods
Meet the Frugalwoods: Achieving Financial Independence Through Simple Living | Elizabeth Willard Thames
11 posts | 15 read | 1 reading | 7 to read
The deeply personal story of how award-winning personal finance blogger Elizabeth Willard Thames abandoned a successful career in the city and embraced frugality to create a more meaningful, purpose-driven life, and retire to a homestead in the Vermont woods at age thirty-two with her husband and daughter. In 2014, Elizabeth and Nate Thames were conventional 9-5 young urban professionals. But the couple had a dream to become modern-day homesteaders in rural Vermont. Determined to retire as early as possible in order to start living each dayas opposed to wishing time away working for the weekendsthey enacted a plan to save an enormous amount of money: well over seventy percent of their joint take home pay. Dubbing themselves the Frugalwoods, Elizabeth began documenting their unconventional frugality and the resulting wholesale lifestyle transformation on their eponymous blog. In less than three years, Elizabeth and Nate reached their goal. Today, they are financially independent and living out their dream on a sixty-six-acre homestead in the woods of rural Vermont with their young daughter. While frugality makes their lifestyle possible, its also what brings them peace and genuine happiness. They dont stress out about impressing people with their material possessions, buying the latest gadgets, or keeping up with any Joneses. In the process, Elizabeth discovered the self-confidence and liberation that stems from disavowing our cultures promise that we can buy our way to "the good life." Elizabeth unlocked the freedom of a life no longer beholden to the clarion call to consume ever-more products at ever-higher sums. Meet the Frugalwoods is the intriguing story of how Elizabeth and Nate realized that the mainstream path wasnt for them, crafted a lifestyle of sustainable frugality, and reached financial independence at age thirty-two. While not everyone wants to live in the woods, or quit their jobs, many of us want to have more control over our time and money and lead more meaningful, simplified lives. Following their advice, you too can live your best life.
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LA_Mead
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“I figured that applying for jobs would be like applying for college: line up all the correct paperwork, check all the right boxes, and get accepted. That‘s adulthood, right?!” -(I can remember thinking this same thought! What a rude awakening THAT was, to graduate into the recession...)

KristenDuck Bahaha oh boy yes. I thought as a teacher I‘d be able to select which school I wanted to teach in and what grade. Nope. 10mo
LA_Mead @KristenDuck haha I remember thinking that too! (I‘m a teacher as well) 10mo
31 likes2 comments
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SarahSaysRead
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Mehso-so

Kind of interesting? Food for thought? And I really appreciated that she acknowledged her privilege multiple times. But... it got kinda preachy.

#nonfiction #audiobook #personalfinancememoir

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Sarz
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Mehso-so

I'm really sorry @Clare-Dragonfly but this one wasn't for me. I was dubious going in and I just couldn't stop myself feeling like it was unsolicited advice.

More thoughts in the comments, because I don't want to offend with my opinions.

Looking forward to making my way through the rest of my #newyearwhodis recommendations
@monalyisha

Sarz I found myself getting angry at Thames's flippant advice. She may have paid lip service to acknowledging her privilege but it's clear that she has no idea what it's like to be working class. She is WEALTHY and there is no way her methods would work for most families. To save hundreds of thousands, you have to earn hundreds of thousands. 11mo
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Chelsea.Poole
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Pickpick

2018 is in the "books" I finished out the year with a couple of #nonfiction reads! I posted about starting this book yesterday and I've already finished today. While I did enjoy it, and it gave me some food for thought, I'm rather shocked to learn about the large amount of money the author's husband makes, as well as herself. While she doesn't commit one way or the other in the book, it reads like they're "average" income-wise. Below??

Chelsea.Poole However, the frugal lifestyle appeals to me greatly and I hope to make some changes in our household in 2019 outlined in the book. If I can get my husband on board, that is!! 11mo
Clare-Dragonfly You should join the Uber Frugal Month Group Challenge on her website! It starts today! 11mo
69 likes2 comments
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Chelsea.Poole
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This is going to be my last book of 2018 and will give me lots to think about for my 2019 goals. I love the idea of living simpler with less. Let's see if I can finish this in a couple days and make a positive plan for the new year! Also partially listening to the #audiobook on #Libby 🔉

8little_paws I appreciate their philosophy, but they are filthy rich so it's easy for them tbh. They're in the 1% income bracket but they don't really share that! 11mo
8little_paws That said I absolutely love the case studies she shares on their blog 11mo
Chelsea.Poole @8little_paws I had no idea! I've never read any of the blog posts or online information about them at all. That's rather shocking from what I've read so far, to be honest! 11mo
8little_paws Yes, her husband alone makes high 200k, close to 300k. It's public record as he's a director of a non profit. She was making over 100k, but I don't know what she makes now that she quit her job. 11mo
90 likes4 stack adds4 comments
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rachlols
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Pickpick

As a female interested in personal finance, outdoors living, and female voices in a male dominated sector, Liz's blog, and this book are right up my alley. Don't worry, I got it from the library. #nonfiction #personalfinance #homesteading

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MallenNC
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Pickpick

I read this for #nonfictionnovember after hearing about it on a Book Riot podcast. I'm giving it a pick because it held my interest as a memoir of a specific person and her lifestyle. I don't think this is a life for everyone and I'm glad the author made note of the fact that this is something she's privileged to choose, because many people have to be frugal out of necessity, not to save for a huge piece of land.

Tamra Good point about frugality & privilege. 13mo
30 likes1 stack add1 comment
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LibrarianChels
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Bailedbailed

I tried really hard to finish this one, but there are too many ramblings where the author is trying to be as funny as possible. I‘d rather she get to the meat of how her and her husband succeeded in becoming financially independent.

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Clare-Dragonfly
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Pickpick

I loved this book, as I knew I would. It‘s about 80% memoir, 20% personal finance advice—but the author‘s frugality is a defining aspect of her life, so it‘s sort of all both. The first half of the book was mostly new to me (or at least the details were new) as a reader of the blog, and the second half was more familiar. I would definitely recommend it for anyone who might be interested in a life off the beaten path.

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Clare-Dragonfly
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I went back to work yesterday and need something to read while pumping, so I‘m finally getting to this (I preordered it and it came out on my baby‘s due date). I love it so far, but I knew I would—Mrs. Frugalwoods is my hero and favorite blogger. I really appreciate that she works so hard to acknowledge her own privilege. This book is showing a different side of her than the blog—I never thought she would be so petulant about not getting engaged!