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Pip2

Pip2

Joined January 2020

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Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
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Bhagavad-Gita As It Is (Revised and Enlarged) by A C Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada
review
Pip2
The Professor: A Tale | Charlotte Bront
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Pickpick

Published posthumously as it was Charlotte‘s first and not well received work. After reading The Professor, I am baffled that it was not published straight away. I find this one of the better books out of the three sisters, having now read them all. I would rate this right up with Jane Eyre, but only more condensed. I enjoyed the narrators character and the many principles that were instilled in the novel. Highly underrated and undervalued. ❤️

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Pip2
Villette | Charlotte Bront
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Pickpick

Well! That was an ending that I was not anticipating. One in which could be interpreted in a variety of ways. I would give you my interpretation but wouldn‘t want to spoil the novel for you. Overall, I enjoyed the book, some chapters could have benefited with being less redundant and more concise. I found it engaging but having read all of the Brontë sister works other than The Professor, I would say Jane Eyre is the greatest overall. 2 Paws Up!

Leftcoastzen 👏🐶 1w
batsy Aww! 😍 1w
14 likes2 comments
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Pip2
No Title | None
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Estate Sale book haul! A friend from work came to be about an estate sale nearby my house, whomever the inhabitants of the house were, they were arduous readers and had one of the most prolific collections I have laid eyes on! Antique books dating back to the mid 1800s, I picked up a collection of George Elliott from 1904 along with various other early edition paperbacks. I also purchased a tote from the sale to haul my booty!

Ann_Reads Oh wow! Middlemarch, too. 2mo
Pip2 @Ann_Reads yes, I have not read It yet, did you? If so, how did you like it? 1mo
Ann_Reads @Pip2 Yes, I read Middlemarch about 15 years ago and I liked it at the time. It is well written with a lot of historical details inserted into the story. I think the religious undertones might be offputting to some readers though. 1mo
Ann_Reads Actually, @Graywacke is reading Middlemarch right now and he always has insightful comments. 🙂 1mo
11 likes4 comments
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Pip2
Franny and Zooey | Jerome David Salinger
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Pickpick

Franny & Zooey, what can I say but definitely worth the time reading. Delves into the conscious of the young adult finding him and herself and the building of self awareness and the self itself. Not recommend for younger audiences as the language can be a bit profane at times. The dialogue in this story was first rate in the way it was written, it places you right there, in the story. Would be a good play or movie, if it hasn‘t already been done.

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Pip2
No Title | None
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Book haul from my birthday trip to the Hudson River valley and Ithaca, NY. Not that it was necessary for an excuse to buy any new books, but having one made it that much more fun!

282Mikado At your age it's good you have a more sedentary hobbie. 😁 2mo
Pip2 Maybe I should give up my gardening hobby then? 😂 2mo
10 likes2 comments
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Pip2
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Panpan

As a part of my yearly goal to read all of the works of the Brontë sisters, Shirley was apart of my required reading for the year. A far cry from Jane Eyre. I found Shirley lagging in plot, and difficult to imbed oneself into the story as I usually do in most of the books I read. To be fair it was well written but not to my taste, I would have shelfed it earlier if it was not a personal goal of mine to complete this novel in its entirety.

Pip2 Added: As a result, this book took me four times the length of time as another book would have with the same length and difficulty. 2mo
282Mikado Congrats on finishing. I gotta give you one for stick-to-it-ivness. based on earlier comments I would have bailed. On to better things. FYI Dombey is good. A couple characters I definitely gravitate towards. Not CDs best, but good. 2mo
9 likes2 comments
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Pip2
Persuasion | Jane Austen
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Finis. This is my second Austin novel that I have completed and faired much better than my first, Emma. Emma had the effect of disrepute and almost affected my to not read another Austin novel again. After admittedly watching and enjoying the Sanditon series and hearing of the release of Persuasion, I thought I would give Austin another chance, and I am very glad I did, the protagonist Anne has a tenderness one can‘t help finding admirable.

Kristin_Reads Persuasion is my favorite of all the Austen novels! 4mo
Pip2 @Kristin_Reads I can see why. It was a really enjoyable read. It has rekindled my opinion of Austen and has motivated me to read another one of her novels later in the year. I was thinking Sense and Sensibility. 4mo
19 likes2 comments
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Pip2
Untitled | Untitled
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Thank you for the tag @EadieB

1. In some areas of my bookshelf, they are placed in a decorative manner… If that counts? I also read what I decorate with though 😉

2. My dog and my wife, I love them both but definitely my two biggest distractions in that order.

Can you play? @batsy @282Mikado @marleed @Dilara @Sparklemn @Kimberlone @staci.reads

batsy Thank you for the tag! 🙂 4mo
10 likes1 comment
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Pip2
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Mehso-so

About a young Chinese American woman trying to find herself and sharing her experiences with three other women who had a close and personal relationship with her recently deceased mother. At times I found the authors writing a little unorganized but also she has kept me engaged enough to want to finish the book. I will watch the film next and compare notes.

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Pip2
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Pickpick

A book that takes you through the stages of the characters lives. Some ebbing and flowing between good and bad but most stay within their fixed characteristics. Lord Lorborough was the most relatable character who was associated with the wrong sort at an earlier part of this life, proof that you are who you associate yourself with. But Arthur was graced with his karma in the end. I would have never predicted the ending in the beginning.

282Mikado Is the barbed-wire topped fence in the background meaningful in any way with regards to the book? 6mo
Pip2 @282Mikado I guess there are points in the book where it is like a prison lol. My work borders the Airport but work can be like prison sometimes, that is, without all the other unpleasantries. 6mo
13 likes2 comments
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Pip2
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Wildfell Hall, same initials as Wuthering Heights, coincidence or intentional? Similar to Wuthering Heights as the narrator is within the story telling the story to someone within the story. Except this is by letter. As per Wuthering Heights, the surrounding landscape deteriorates the closer you get to Wildfell Hall. Symbolism of the deprivation upon reaching proximity of the property enclosure. Some notes of similariity to sister Emily‘s work.

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Pip2
This post contains spoilers
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A good beginning, I am already invested in the story and am looking forward to seeing what happens next. Anne‘s writing has definitely improved from Agnes Grey to Wildfell Hall. It saddens me to not be indulged with other great works from these sisters. Such a cultural travesty death can bring at times. Michael Millward the reverend: Reminds me of Mr Pomblechook from Great Expectations. Arrogance and sternness and lack of empathy being heightened

Pip2 qualities whereby as a reverend is a disservice to his parishioners.
Richard Wilson sounds like a nice young man, someone I would befriend, at least in these earlier stages. Gilbert Markham is a little gossip and is a hypocrite in the sense of calling Robert one, and it sounds like his brother Fergus is not far behind. Jane Wilson sounds like a materialistic gold digger. And who prey tell is Halford? And why is Gilbert in debt to him?
8mo
1 like1 comment
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Pip2
King Henry VI | William Shakespeare
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Panpan

If I am being honest, this was not a very enjoyable read for me. A lot of back forth in changing hands of leadership from Lancaster house to York house, a stabbing here and there and not the greatest dialogue. It is Shakespeare‘s first play but I most definitely prefer Ibsen as a playwright.

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Pip2
King Henry VI | William Shakespeare
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“O graceless men! They know not what they do.”
#Russian ragged multitude

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Pip2
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Pickpick

Very well written but very bleak, a sense reaching out for the most pessimistic response to anything internal or external within the confines of the book. I can‘t help but think that Emily had a very sordid view on humanity and in life in general. I not sure if I would pick this one back up as I need to be lifted out of the lull this book has shimmed me into. If I had to pick my favorite Brontë sister, Charlotte from what I read thus far.

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Pip2
Agnes Grey | Anne Bront, Acton Bell
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Pickpick

I enjoyed the last two chapters and overall an enjoyable read, a bit more simplistic in development in comparison to Jane Eyre. I enjoyed the lightness and pertness of the story overall, short like a Hemmingway and not overly descriptive as a Dickens, and more enjoyable than an Austin. I would place this at the top 50% of books read by yours truly. Jane still wins out at this point though in the Bronte competition of 2022. Happy reading everyone!

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Pip2
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Pickpick

The turmoil and persistent lamentations in this book is unequivocal. “Because we are to menny.” That quote has been burned in my memory for years to come. This is my third Hardy book this year and again have not been disappointed. I wish I could say more but do not want to spoil the story.

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Pip2
Untitled | Unknown
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A little late to the game. Thank you @EadieB for the invite! 1. Jude Frawley so far as I am halfway through the novel Jude the Obscure and at least to this point I could see myself befriending Jude. 2. I‘m torn between Mr Pumblechook from Great Expectations as he is a pompous kno it all, or Alec D‘Urbeville from Tess of the D‘Urbevilles, Alec is a dirtbag of the highest order. 3. I am grateful for a great wife and great friends. 😊 @282Mikado

EadieB Thanks for playing! Glad you were able to figure it out! 10mo
7 likes1 comment
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Pip2
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Pickpick

A very sad but enlightening tale on how societies rules and measures can have a significant effect upon the innocent. Choices made to honor thy parents, in turn a cascading effect of depravity and tumultuous turn outs follow. Sad as it may be, highly recommended as in learning how the hypocritical advances of society, at least in my observations may have shifted but alas, hypocrisy still follows in the guise of another animal.

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Pip2
Penguin Classics Jane Eyre | Charlotte Bront
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Pickpick

So eloquently written and it has resemblances of differing books I have read in the past. Superb eloquence of dialogue within certain impoverished scenes, reminds me sometimes of Hugo, or when I am transcended to a more pastoral scene I feel like Hardy‘s hand is penning the page. Or during the scene of quaint but sophisticated and humble enjoyment I am transported to Howard‘s End. The ending had perceived notions of Great Expectations. Remarkable.

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Pip2
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Pickpick

An amazing novel that will take you on a romantic journey through the pastoral English landscape. Hardy writes so eloquently placing you in the scene, surrounded in the pages as if you are really there. Even the use of language envisages the characters through the author‘s true lens. I also watched the BBC 2015 drama starring Carey Mulligan. Very well done, but the book still is better than the movie. Highly recommended. ❤️

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Pip2
The Collected Novels of the Bronte Sisters | Emily Bront, Charlotte Bront, Anne Bront
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The included photo is a gift from my lovely wife Garima. The collected works of Anne, Charlotte, and Emily Bronte. The Artwork on the dust jacket is from Juniper Books, apart of their Obvious State collection with Everyman‘s Library. Truly love this!

Chrissyreadit These are gorgeous! @sprainedbrain have you seen these before???? 11mo
sprainedbrain @Chrissyreadit yes! They are so beautiful. ❤️ 11mo
11 likes2 comments
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Pip2
Dombey & Son | Charles Dickens
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My office Secret Santa truly gets me. I also wanted to wish all my fellow bibliophiles a Happy Holidays!

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Pip2
The Count of Monte Cristo | Alexander Dumas
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Pickpick

A man of many masks, the Count of Monte Cristo teaches one to go through life with some degree of humanity and to remain humble to some degree. This masterpiece incessantly kept you on edge all throughout 1243 pages of pure ingeniousness. The ending was prolific and tied the rest of the novel together very nicely. My only criticism comes not from the novel itself but the publisher. I purchased this novel brand new and the etching is already worn.

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Pip2
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Pickpick

Most definitely a comfort read that brings me back to the days of my childhood, reading Goosebumps and Fear Street and binging through the novels at a brisk rate. Rowling does a great job coercing the reader into the story and developing a strong bond with the characters. Consequently, I can hardly wait to read the sequel and say hello again to a great group of friends.

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Pip2
Finding the Mother Tree | Suzanne Simard
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Pickpick

“The cohesion of biodiversity in a forest, the musicians in an orchestra, the members of a family growing through conversation and feedback, through memories and learning from the past, even if chaotic and unpredictable, leveraging scarce resources to thrive.” Mothers trees linking to a mycorrhizal network assisting primarily its own kin but also assisting trees apart of the surrounding network to improve the environment and further biodiversity.

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Pip2
Bram Stoker's Dracula | Bram Stoker
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Pickpick

Dracula or Drakulya who may have been based of the vicious, despotic, blood thirsty Wallachian (Romanian) ruler of the mid 15th century has hints of the man behind the undead mask‘s prior fleets in real life. The story in itself has defied my expectations. I honestly thought that this would be another tacky and fruitless horror novel but it was so much more than that! From Nosferatu to Dracula Untold, Stoker far exceeds the cinematic experience.

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Pip2
The Secret Garden (Illustrated Edition) | Frances Hodgson Burnett, General Press
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A children‘s classic from 1911 based in England. Although a children‘s classic, it could be purported as a young adult classic. A lovely read with mysticism and spiritual gathering, including all the best elements life has to offer. Love, community, wisdom, books, and gardens shaping to display that how one perceives life is how one will experience it. Fill your mind with the positive elements of your life suffusing little room for the negative.

282Mikado As I said, a surprisingly good book. Don't set your sights to high with the movie. 14mo
6 likes1 stack add1 comment
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Pip2
Bleak House (UK) | Charles Dickens
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A gift from my wife for my Birthday! And what a great gift indeed! ❤️

282Mikado I have been thinking, it is interesting that she should have bought you this book now. The case of Jarndyce vs. Jarndyce may be eerily apropos for your current situation. Perhaps you should elevate this in your “to be read“, and I may need to add it to my “to be reread“. 14mo
Pip2 Wow! I never put two and two together! Many interwoven circumstances have been prevalent in the last couple years with no explanation other than pure coincidence. Maybe we could do this read together. And compare notes on the book and the similar circumstances that surround it. (edited) 14mo
9 likes1 stack add2 comments
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Pip2
Little Dorrit (UK) | Charles Dickens
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Pickpick

Little Dorrit demonstrates and insists on the possibility of moral self-cultivation and rewards or punishes those characters according to their moral behavior. In short, no one gets away with anything because everyone's accountable for themselves. The intricate development of the characters predisposes the reader to be heavily vested in the story‘s characters and the stories development, an overall delightful read!

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Pip2
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Pickpick

If you have a love for history, an affinity for botany and gardening, then you will appreciate how the founding gardeners have been induced to take magnanimous roles for the betterment of our country but have always deigned to journey home to hearth and garden with their books amongst their garden where some trees planted were only second to Methuselah. I also appreciated the account of Bartram‘s garden and his contribution to the Franklinia.

282Mikado Nice pic.
1y
8 likes1 comment
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Pip2
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When the skipper was attempting to dissuade the sailors from going on leave one of the sailors denouncing him as “a lying old son of a sea-cook who begrudged a fellow a few hours Liberty,” exclaimed an oath, “ but you don‘t bounce me out of my liberty, old chap, for all your yarns; for I would go ashore if every pebble on the beach was a live coal, and every stick a gridiron, and the cannibals stood ready to boil me on landing.”

3 likes1 stack add
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Pip2
Walden, Or, Life in the Woods | Henry David Thoreau
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“In the midst of this chopping sea of civilized life, such are the clouds and storms and quicksands and thousand-and-one items to be allowed for, that a man has to live.”

Leftcoastzen Beautiful! 1y
readingjedi That's lovely! 1y
282Mikado “...if he would not founder and go to the bottom and not make his port at all, by dead reckoning, and he must be a great calculator indeed who succeeds.“

Had to look this up. It is even better with what was left unsaid.
1y
Pip2 @282Mikado I love this quote. It is a reminder to simplify life at every opportunity. To reduced one‘s affairs when able and live life to the true fullest, not being caught up in the rigmarole of life and the societies news or social media outlets but to simplify. The one who succeeds in a multitude of tasks and doesn‘t simplify will drown oneself in the quicksands of magnanimity. 1y
11 likes2 stack adds4 comments
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Pip2
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Pickpick

A little more drawn out then was necessary. Anna Karenina was more compact and definitely preferred over War & Peace. That being said, this is definitely a masterpiece and should be required reading. The second epilogue was repetitive. The point of free will vs the laws of nature could have been summed up in one chapter. 12 chapters was a little excessive to make this point. Much of the novel had many examples of excess indulgences throughout.

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Pip2
The Stand | Stephen King
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Bailedbailed

Not my cup of tea. The beauty of life is that we have many variations of people with many varying interests. This one did not peak mine after 136 pages. I will be giving this to a close friend who loves King‘s works. I know he will enjoy it more than I ever could. Bail for me.

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Pip2
Hard Times | Charles Dickens
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Panpan

Fact, this book was a painful read. There were moments that the book was enjoyable to read but this is subpar in comparison to many other of Dickens‘ works that I have read. I wouldn‘t recommend this one. Unfortunately not his best work in my subjective opinion.

282Mikado Sorry to hear that. I read this quite a while ago, but really can't remember it at all. Most Dicken's novels I have read I can at least remember somewhat. Perhaps your pan explains why I'm having “hard times“ recalling this one. 🤔 2y
2 likes1 comment
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Pip2
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Pickpick

If you want to read a book in regards to the human condition and how life and upbringing and circumstance can afflict or allow advantage, this is the book to read. Even though this book was based in the 1850s and was a pre civil war novel, it has many instances where the human condition paired on this earth has not changed entirely too much, good and bad. Uncle Tom‘s Cabin is a great novel to remind mankind to love thy neighbor.

6 likes1 stack add
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Pip2
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Pickpick

My initial grounds for reading the following book was for my love of literature of the sea, the romanticism of whaling, and its confluence with 19th century New England. In the Heart of the Sea navigates the true story of the Essex whaleship out of Nantucket in 1819, which was Melville‘s inspiration to writing his masterpiece. This was an enjoyable account to read and the movie was also very well done. Highly recommend to the fellow thalassophile.

282Mikado If there is one thing I love it is filing my thalassos. 😁 Seriously, as you know, I LOVE the sea. This just got stacked. (edited) 2y
3 likes1 stack add1 comment
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Pip2
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Pickpick

A relaxing read prior to moving back to NY. Betty Smith was a New Yorker that had lived in Chapel Hill as I have and I am now moving back to my old roots. Coincidentally I was reading this book at the time we made our final decision to move back. A great read about a girl and her family during the early part of the 20th century. Gives a good account on what it may have been like to grow up in poverty and the arduous struggle to climb out of it.

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Pip2
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Pickpick

Very enjoyable and relaxing read and no it‘s not just about crawfish 🦞 😆 Some unexpected twists in turns in this one, I would like to give a more thorough review but I fear I would reveal some of the plot while doing so.

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Pip2
The Nickel Boys: A Novel | Colson Whitehead
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Took a break from studying to read another one of Colson Whitehead‘s books, The Nickel Boys. This is a fictional novel based on true evens on what happened to the tenants at the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Florida. This was a gripping read that really displayed the injustice of institutional racism in the Deep South. Highly Recommend.

britt_brooke So good! One of my top reads of the year, for sure. 2y
13 likes1 comment
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Pip2
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Pickpick

What attracted me to this book was my previous attraction to the efficiency of Toyota and the use of lean methods to improve processes throughout any organization. If you desire waste reduction, increased efficiency processes while improving staff and company moral, higher quality output than this is the book for you. These principles can be used in a personal setting as well as professional and still applies today.

282Mikado Your review is true if it is used effectively. Last year everyone in my department was required to do two green belts or 10 yellow belt projects for the year. 100 people, most of whom travel 60-80% as trainers or field service. There isn't that much improvement needed in our department nor do the people have the time. The projects that do get done usually cost more to document than they save the company. As a bonus to the company, morale tanked. (edited) 2y
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Pip2
Emma | Jane Austen, James Kinsley, Adela Pinch
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Panpan

I just realized that my fandom for Mark Twain correlates with my annoyance of Austen, Twain once said “ I often want to criticize Jane Austen, but her books madden me so that I can't conceal my frenzy from the reader; and therefore I have to stop every time I begin. Every time I read Pride and Prejudice I want to dig her up and beat her over the skull with her own shin-bone.” Mark Twain might be a bit extreme but I find accuracy in his candor.

282Mikado On this point, Twain and I would have been in absolute agreement.
(I like the picture).
3y
13 likes1 comment
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Pip2
David Copperfield | Dickens Charles
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Pickpick

Dickens does a great job grasping the reader into the story but the mid section of the book tends to lag a bit and could have been more concise. At times I found myself putting the novel down to take a break from the conglomeration of wordiness in the story. It was all worth it in the end though as Dickens does an articulate job recalling the earlier pieces of the book and bringing the past and future in unison together.

282Mikado Although I am a bit more critical of the "wordiness", yours is a good review. 3y
10 likes1 comment
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Pip2
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Pickpick

Pudd‘nhead Wilson (1894) by Mark Twain. A fantastic read and a very underrated book amongst the collective of all of Twain‘s works. Not a very long or arduous read, only 203 pages in length but it was hard not to be engaged at every interval and gifted with very suspenseful ending. A book that was hard to put down and will more than likely be reread in the future.

282Mikado The rocking chair seems fitting alongside a Twain novel.
3y
Pip2 I thought so, besides that‘s my outdoor reading chair. Garimas is on the other side of the end table. 3y
4 likes1 stack add2 comments
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Pip2
Farenheit 451 | Ray Bradbury, Cid Knipel
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Pickpick

Completed this reading of Fahrenheit 451. This was a profound read at a profound moment in history. This book displays how censorship can negatively effect society inadvertently and also with malicious intent. “Books are sacred to free men for very good reasons, and that wars have been fought against nations which hate books and burn them. If you are an American, you must allow all ideas to circulate freely in your community, not merely your own.

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Pip2
Farenheit 451 | Ray Bradbury, Cid Knipel
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Reading Farenheit 451 on my lunch break, a little over 20 pages in and definitely an interesting read. Without giving too much away, the Fireman Montag doesn‘t actually put out fires, he is in a profession of firemen that burn books for a living. This man would be public enemy #1 in my world.

282Mikado Roger that. Put the firemen in the fire! 3y
Pip2 I‘m all for that! 😁 3y
12 likes2 comments
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Pip2
Howards End | E M Forster
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Pickpick

Am interesting read, taking place pre-WW 1, at the beginning of the novel it showed references to diplomatic interrelations in Europe. At first I thought Forester was going to be going in the direction of a pre war novel but as I delved further into the book I noticed the real moral of the story which applies not only to people but to nations as well. “A place, as well as a person, may catch the glow. It is part of the battle against sameness.”Meg

282Mikado Great review, Pip. That quote (which I missed) does bring additional light to the work. 3y
Pip2 Thank you, I couldn‘t fit the entire quote but extracted the important pieces of the quote. 3y
6 likes2 comments
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Pip2
Born a Crime | Trevor Noah
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Pickpick

Completed this book in two days. A real page turner, I normally delve into classic literature but I really enjoyed this autobiographical account of Trevor Noah. This was a first hand account of what apartheid did to Africans in South Africa with regards to segregation, and purposeful isolationism and its after effect. Trevor Noah still manages to take such a serious topic such as apartheid and dabbles humorous content throughout the book.

282Mikado I just noticed something. Do you build puzzles too? Both Chelsea and I love doing puzzles. 3y
Pip2 @282Mikado yes, Garima and I were working on a 1000 piece puzzle of Cuba that we purchased at Barnes & Noble. We enjoy sitting at the table together and seeing the image come alive. She is definitely the bigger puzzle connoisseur than I though. 3y
282Mikado @Pip2 Since Chelsea left I lost my puzzle partner. She worked ground up, I worked sky down. Unfortunately no one else has the interest. I just finished a 1000 piece of an old British Ship of the Line. I prefer 1000 pc. or better. 3y
13 likes3 comments
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Pip2
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Just completed the last remaining of Conan Doyle‘s Sherlock Holmes stories. His Last Bow: a 1917 collection including the short story, "His Last Bow. The War Service of Sherlock Holmes" (1917). In the last story the reader is made aware of the advances in technology during the early 20th century and also makes reference to the First World War. The most enjoyable read amongst these stories was The Adventures of the Devils Foot (1910).