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Very, Very, Very Dreadful
Very, Very, Very Dreadful: The Influenza Pandemic of 1918 | Albert Marrin
12 posts | 10 read | 18 to read
From National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin comes a fascinating look at the history and science of the deadly 1918 flu pandemic--and the chances for another worldwide pandemic. In spring of 1918, World War I was underway, and troops at Fort Riley, Kansas, found themselves felled by influenza. By the summer of 1918, the second wave struck as a highly contagious and lethal epidemic and within weeks exploded into a pandemic, an illness that travels rapidly from one continent to another. It would impact the course of the war, and kill many millions more soldiers than warfare itself. Of all diseases, the 1918 flu was by far the worst that has ever afflicted humankind; not even the Black Death of the Middle Ages comes close in terms of the number of lives it took. No war, no natural disaster, no famine has claimed so many. In the space of eighteen months in 1918-1919, about 500 million people--one-third of the global population at the time--came down with influenza. The exact total of lives lost will never be known, but the best estimate is between 50 and 100 million. In this powerful book, filled with black and white photographs, nonfiction master Albert Marrin examines the history, science, and impact of this great scourge--and the possibility for another worldwide pandemic today.
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RamsFan1963
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Pickpick

Not technically a "horror" book, but the events described in it are truly horrifying. I didn't know that the book was meant for a YA audience until I read a review. The images and descriptions are pretty intense and gruesome, not for people easily grossed out. 3 ??? 1/2

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elizabethlk
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Pickpick

Albert Marrin writes some of the best YA history books out there, and this is no exception. He covers the big picture and all the background info while still touching on individual experiences. Highly recommended to anyone early teens and up interested in epidemics/pandemics, WWI, and early 20th century history.

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elizabethlk
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Really enjoying this book by Albert Marrin (everything I have read from him is great) but dying at this newspaper clipping of a baseball player turned preacher.

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Jennie748
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Pickpick

I finished this yesterday and immediately shoved it into my husband‘s hands. It‘s that good. But also, the last chapter is a little fear-mongering to me.

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SuziQoregon
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Mehso-so

I liked parts of it but other parts not so much.

jwashreads I read The Great Influenza a few years ago. It's by John Barry, ans I thought it was really good. I've never heard of this one though. 2y
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SuziQoregon
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This YA book about the 1918 Flu pandemic was recommended by @BethFishReads

It‘s good so far.

BethFishReads Glad you‘re liking it 2y
Swe_Eva Great cover! 2y
lorannen Off-topic, but I can't get over thinking how much that looks like Gene Wilder's eyes on the cover. 2y
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RachaelFryman
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Currently ready while keeping an eye on the Reds game! #openingday

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Amie
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Mehso-so

My main criticism is that the description of the work that nurses did during the pandemic was reduced to fluffing pillows, saying kind words to patients, & being pretty faces. The author does acknowledge that the work they did was physically & emotionally exhausting and that nurses were willing to put their own health at risk to help others, but offered no description of what that work actually entailed, beyond fluffing pillows & kind words.

Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks I probably shouldn‘t read this one!!!! Lol 2y
Amie @Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks you might find the rest of it interesting, but you probably wouldn't like the part about nurses just fluffing pillows (and the fact that they're only given a small mention in spite of all the work they did). I'm sure even in 1918 they did more than fluff pillows. 2y
Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks Oh yes!!! That is infuriating!! 😡😡 2y
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EvieBee
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Finally! I‘ve been waiting on these for a month! I thought the library was closed yesterday. It wasn‘t! So picked them up today. Now I can get on with the Vera Stanhope series AND read about the Influenza Pandemic of 1918 simultaneously.

#libraryhaul #bookhaul

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SarahMillerBooks
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I kidnapped this one right off the library‘s processing shelf for the weekend — don‘t tell the YA librarian! 🤫

EvieBee A-ha! 🤓 2y
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Beckys_Books
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Dreading tomorrow's dentist appointment. Just a cleaning, but any visit to the dentist gives me anxiety. I'd rather give birth without pain meds than go to this appointment.

RadicalReader @Beckys_Books reminds me of Garfield‘s outlook on life 2y
Tamra Great philosophy! I understand bc I hate going to the doctor. Definitive reward yourself with a bookish treat afterwards. Something to look forward to! 2y
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Hornsby78 I also have a dentist phobia and have told myself that I HAVE to deal with this in 2018 and go have work done. We'll see if I can overcome it or not. 2y
JacqMac Good luck! Treat yourself to a new book afterwards. That‘s what I did when I went to the dentist yesterday. 2y
SusanInTiburon @Hornsby78 in our area, lots of dentists advertise special services for fearful people. I hope you can find someone who will help with your fear. You are not alone. 2y
70 likes6 comments
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BethFishReads
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Pickpick

This is the 100th anniversary year of the great flu pandemic. I have a number of flu books on my list, but I started with this. Although geared to younger teens or tweens, this is a serious examination of the many complex factors that lead to the disease that “killed more ppl in less time than other disease before or since.” Fascinating & accessible w/ great historic photos @penguinrandomhouse

Tamra Were there one or two principle factors that made the outbreak so deadly? I‘ve never read anything about it. 2y
BethFishReads @Tamra this book described it as a perfect storm of factors, including World War I and contemporary medical practices. 2y
Tamra @BethFishReads scary to contemplate. Our lives are fragile in light of our vulnerability to the seemingly infinite number and adaptability of viruses and bacterium. I‘m guessing it will be our downfall. 2y
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Reviewsbylola Omg I‘m all over this! 2y
BethFishReads @Tamra so true. 2y
BethFishReads @Reviewsbylola I highly recommend it. It published last week 2y
Nebklvr @BethFishReads I liked the one by Barry 2y
BethFishReads @Nebklvr good to know. That‘s on my list 2y
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