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#HistoryGetsLIT
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TheKidUpstairs
Moby-Dick, Or, The Whale | Herman Melville
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#OnThisDay in 1851 Moby-Dick was first published. Like many works of art, the novel would remain unrecognized during Melville's lifetime, selling only 3715 copies and earning the author a mere $556.37 before his death in 1891. A posthumous reprint garnered some critical interest, and slowly a following was built, leading to Carl Van Doren's 1921 claim that Moby-Dick was "one of the greatest... in the... literature of the world." #HistoryGetsLIT

vivastory Have to say I agree with Van-Doren 🐳 2mo
LeahBergen I‘ll take that edition, please. 😉 2mo
TheKidUpstairs @LeahBergen it can be yours for a mere $65,000! 2mo
58 likes1 stack add3 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1896 Anton Chekov vowed to never write another play after a rather embarrassing opening night of The Seagull. If you've ever witnessed a toddler or teenager throwing a tantrum, claiming they're never going to do something again, you can guess how long that declaration lasted. The Seagull is now considered the first of Chekhov's four major works with Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters, and The Cherry Orchard. #HistoryGetsLIT

zezeki What an interesting fact, I had no idea! 2mo
54 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1950 the world was introduced to the magical land of Narnia with the publication of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. The first glimpse of the story came to Lewis at the age of 16 when he imagined a fawn walking through a snowy wood. Many years later that fawn became Mr Tumnus and Narnia was born. Another beloved character didn't appear in the story's earliest drafts, can you guess who? #HistoryGetsLIT

Soubhiville This is totally just a guess, but the little mouse? From the end? I can‘t remember his name…. Also this old cover is so cool, I‘ve never seen it before. 2mo
AvidReader25 Maybe Mr. Beaver? 2mo
vivastory What @Soubhiville said about the cover! 2mo
See All 14 Comments
TheKidUpstairs @vivastory @Soubhiville isn't it great? It's the first edition - only $12,895 (plus shipping) on AbeBooks! Check the couch cushions! 2mo
TheKidUpstairs @Soubhiville @AvidReader25 nope! I'll give people some more time to guess, and then I'll be sure to tag you both in the answer! 2mo
vivastory @TheKidUpstairs 😂 I have some coins I need to take to the bank 2mo
TheKidUpstairs @vivastory sweet, almost there! Don't forget to check that coat you haven't worn since last winter, I'm always finding a few thousand spare dollars in mine 🤣 2mo
vivastory It's so funny that you said that because I literally picked up a new hoodie this evening 😂 2mo
LeahBergen My guess is Aslan? 2mo
MatchlessMarie Bahaha 🛋 💰 my guess is Mr Beaver 🦫 2mo
TheKidUpstairs @LeahBergen for the win! Early drafts didn't include Aslan. Lewis was ready to abandon the whole thing until he created the Lion and was finally able to complete a draft he felt right about. @Soubhiville @AvidReader25 @MatchlessMarie 2mo
Soubhiville Wow, he‘s such a central part. 🦁 2mo
LeahBergen So cool! 2mo
AvidReader25 Oh wow! I can‘t imagine Narnia without Aslan! 2mo
71 likes14 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
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(10/15) #OnThisDay in 1915 the first issue of Detective Story Magazine was published. One of the first pulp magazines devoted to mystery stories, Detective Story ran until 1949. Originally published twice a month, the magazine's success eventually led to weekly issues. Authors whose stories appeared in the magazine include Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Johnston McCulley, and Arthur B Reeve. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1926 A.A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh was first published. Inspired by Milne's son Christopher Robin and a female black bear from Canada, the book was an immediate success. Christopher Robin Milne's original stuffies which inspired Pooh and his friends were donated in 1987 to the New York Public Library. After the real Winnie passed, they found evidence of severe gum disease, likely from the honey buns fed to her by fans #HistoryGetsLIT

LeahBergen Love this! And I made a point of seeing the originals at the NYPL when I visited. ❤️❤️ 2mo
CarolynM ❤️ I love the stories, but knowing how the real Christopher Robin felt casts quite a shadow. (edited) 2mo
Aimeesue @LeahBergen Me too! First stop after Patience and Fortitude ❤️ I also stumbled on to a first edition of The House on Pooh Corner last year, which, obviously, I threw my arms around and refused to let go of. As one does with these things. 1mo
LeahBergen @Aimeesue Lucky you! 😮 1mo
62 likes1 stack add4 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
Peanuts | Charles M. Schultz
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#OnThisDay in 1950 the first Peanuts comic strip featuring Good Ol' Charlie Brown appeared. Snoopy would make his first appearance two days later, and in December of the same year Charlie would first don his iconic yellow and black shirt. Find an awesome timeline of the strip here: https://peanuts.fandom.com/wiki/Peanuts_timeline #HistoryGetsLIT

LeahBergen He looks strange without that little zigzag on his shirt! 2mo
TheKidUpstairs @LeahBergen totally strange! It's interesting to see how the art developed to what we now know. If you scroll down on this link you can see what Snoopy originally looked like (close, but just different enough to be kind of jarring!) https://blog.retroplanet.com/character-of-the-week-snoopy/ 2mo
52 likes2 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
Treasure Island | Robert Louis Stevenson
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#OnThisDay in 1881 Treasure Island began serialization in Young Folks children's magazine. It proved less-than-popular in serialized form, children complained at the slow pacing, but its following grew one published as a complete novel. In the ensuing century and (nearly) a half, it has become one of the most adapted works in the English language (once the Muppets have a version, you know it's a hit!). #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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#OnThisDay in 1856 American author and child welfare advocate Kate Douglas Wiggin was born. Best known for writing the children's classic Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Wiggin devoted much of her life to bettering the lives of children. She and her sister Nora established the first free Kindergarten program in San Francisco in 1878 and the first training school for Kindergarten teachers. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
Annie Allen | Gwendolyn Brooks
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#OnThisDay in 1950 Gwendolyn Brooks became the first African American to win a Pulitzer Prize, for her second book of poetry: Annie Allen. The collection told the story of the titular Annie Allen, growing up and coming of age and dealing with poverty, racism, and war. While it was only her second book, Brooks had been published countless times, starting at the age of 13 with the poem 'Eventide' in American Childhood. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
The Phantom of the Opera | Gaston Leroux
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#OnThisDay in 1908 Gaston Leroux' The Phantom of the Opera began serialization in Le Gaulois. Leroux's inspiration for the tale came from a real fire which caused a chandelier to crash, and rumors of ghosts haunting Paris' famed Palais Garnier. The story was not immediately successful, but slowly grew a sort of cult fan base. (Cont'd in comments) #HistoryGetsLIT

TheKidUpstairs To date, it has been adapted into just about every medium available (please do yourself a favor and check out the poster for Robert Englund's Phantom) including the longest running show on Broadway. 2mo
rubyslippersreads Soon to close on Broadway … 😢 2mo
vivastory @rubyslippersreads I listened to it again last night 2mo
51 likes2 stack adds3 comments