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Auschwitz Lullaby
Auschwitz Lullaby: A Novel | Mario Escobar
37 posts | 19 read | 50 to read
Auschwitz Lullaby brings to life the story of Helene Hannemanna woman who sacrificed everything for family and fought furiously for the children she hoped to save. On an otherwise ordinary morning in 1943, Helene Hannemann is preparing her five children for the day when the German police arrive at her home. Helenes worst fears come true when the police, under strict orders from the SS, demand that her children and husband, all of Romani heritage, be taken into custody. Though Helene is German and safe from the forces invading her home, she refuses to leave her familysealing her fate in a way she never could have imagined. After a terrifying trek across the continent, Helene and her family arrive at Auschwitz and are thrown into the chaos of the camp. Her husband, Johann, is separated from them, but Helene remains fiercely protective of her children and those around her. When the powers-that-be discover that Helene is not only a German but also a trained nurse, she is forced into service at the camp hospital, which is overseen by the notorious Dr. Mengele himself. Helene is under no illusions in terms of Dr. Mengeles intentions, but she agrees to cooperate when he asks her to organize a day care and school for the Romani children in the camp. Though physically and emotionally brutalized by the conditions at Auschwitz, Helene musters the strength to protect the children in her care at any cost. Through sheer force of will, Helene provides a haven for the children of Auschwitzan act of kindness and selflessness so great that it illuminates the darkest night of human history. Based on a true story, Mario Escobars Auschwitz Lullaby demonstrates the power of sacrifice and the strength of human dignityeven when all hope seems lost.
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Insightsintobooks
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This is about a Romani family taken to Auschwitz (based on actual events) because not everyone taken to the camps was Jewish.

I actually haven't read many books about the non jews that were taken to the camps, I would like to learn more about their experiances. Does anyone have any suggestions? Thank you.

Kaylamburson Sarah's Key about the French, I believe, and not specifically about the camps but Salt to the Sea (YA) gives you a completely different look at WWII around the sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff (bigger disaster than the Titanic & Lusitania combined), but rarely talked about because it was filled with refugees. 1mo
Texreader I think it was about Jews but this title reminded me of an excellent audiobook I listened to years ago, about the Holocaust, 1mo
Texreader @Kaylamburson I started the movie but had to stop. Way way way too heartbreaking for my emotional heart. (edited) 1mo
Texreader Book 2 in Ken Follett‘s Century Trilogy: 1mo
rwmg There is a play called Bent about gays in Berlin, some of whom end up taken to the camps. 1mo
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review
sblbooks
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Pickpick

⭐⭐⭐.5
The story of a mother's love. Helene gives up her freedom to try to save her Gypsy family. She ends up running the Auchwitz Nursery. I wanted to like the story more than I did. It was the writing style mainly, for an adult novel I was left wanting more. I would have rated higher if it had been a middle grade book. @megnews *photo credit books-a-million.com

megnews I agree 3mo
31 likes1 comment
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SharonAlger
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Pickpick

Beautiful, devastating, uplifting, ugly. All mismatching words that describe this book perfectly. It‘s made me so grateful for all the little things in everyday life that we all take for granted.

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megnews
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sblbooks It makes the story much more touching and heartbreaking. I love stories based on true events, but it's also harder to read about something that really happened. It's unbelievable to me that this actually happened. What's scary is it could happen again, if people don't learn from history. 3mo
megnews I agree with everything you said @sblbooks It‘s definitely more horrific when you know it‘s someone‘s real story. 3mo
SaturnDoo Reading about true events such as this is a good reminder of how important it is to teach others about how we should and shouldn't treat others. 3mo
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megnews
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sblbooks This sort of continues from the last question, but once you lose hope that's it. If you have no hope you have no reason to live. Therefore you won't fight. I'm amazed that Helen, was able to keep hope alive. By doing so she was able to save more lives. This is true of many survivors. 3mo
megnews Having read Holocaust memoirs it‘s clear hope was the only thing that kept people going. When people gave up hope they shortly give up and die. The nursery gave the workers, the children, and their parents the valuable commodity of hope. 3mo
SaturnDoo Hope is strength. I think these people knew that without it there was no chance of survival. So for those who continued to hope it was their most valuable possession. Without hope, they had no reason to continue to live. Therefore they gave up and died. 3mo
megnews @SaturnDoo agree! 3mo
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megnews
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sblbooks Many were in shock.When the people started losing family members and seeing so many people die it definitely had an effect on their mental state. How could it not? After a while they just lost hope and thought the only way to get out of this prison was to die themselves. 3mo
SaturnDoo The body's natural defense system of fight or flight response probably helped a lot of the survivors survive physically and mentally. The mind is an amazing part of the human body. I'm wondering if over time they blocked out a lot of the abuse/torment to maintain mental stability in order to survive. Especially when they knew at any time death could happen. 3mo
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megnews
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sblbooks In a word, propaganda. He just wanted to make a name for himself. They didn't want the full truth to come out, to other countries. It was just another way of giving the prisoners false hope. 3mo
megnews @sblbooks I agree. And it made it “easy” for him to select his victims. 3mo
SaturnDoo During that time Dr. Mengele was an assistant to a researcher who was doing experiments on twins and other multiple birth children. Having the school was an easy access to the children without the parents or anyone else suspecting any wrong doing. I'm sure there were other benefits for him as well as making a good name for himself at the time, until the truth was discovered. 3mo
megnews @SaturnDoo agree totally 3mo
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megnews
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megnews I don‘t. There was probably rumors and conjecture of what might be happening but there was also a lot of propaganda about how great the camps were. And who could imagine people could be so cruel and evil. I think they had no idea what was going to happen. 3mo
sblbooks I think she knew it was bad but I don't think she had any idea to what extent. I don't think anyone could even fathom such atrocities before the Holocaust. 3mo
SaturnDoo Yes, I think there was some idea of what was going on. Especially when her husband's family had been deported 3 years earlier and never heard from again. That's a sure sign/red flag that things were probably really bad. It was said that it didn't take her long to realize what was happening once they were at the train station boarding the brown cattle car. I think she knew but tried to block it from her mind just to get by daily. 3mo
megnews @SaturnDoo yes, I can‘t imagine the strength of mind it had to take to survive the circumstances they faced. 3mo
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megnews
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megnews When faced with this question about other Holocaust stories I usually say I‘d like to think I‘d be strong but one can never know for sure until you‘re faced with the situation. In this case, however, I can‘t imagine not going with my children. I would probably run the nursery school as well because it would be something for my children & others that might lessen the horrors of camp for awhile. The other option to sit & wait is not appealing. 3mo
sblbooks I can't imagine ever leaving your family. Hindsight's 20/20 but I probably would have tried to leave the country beforehand. These people had no idea what was coming though. 3mo
megnews @sblbooks I agree which is why my answer to the next question is no. 3mo
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SaturnDoo Helene's in-laws had already been deported to Poland 3 years earlier but because she was a pure bred her family had not been bothered. Still yet, I think I would have tried to leave the country as soon as the the in-laws were deported. Nothing at that time was a guaranteed safety net.Because they risked staying and the police came the only option she had was to go with her family. At that moment, I would have gone with my kids too. 3mo
megnews @SaturnDoo I think a lot of people were trying to emigrate but couldn‘t find a country to take them, were getting charged exorbitant “fees” they couldn‘t afford, or were getting the bureaucratic run around from the Nazis. There was so much propaganda about the camps it‘s hard to know what people could know at the time. It‘s kind of like the frog in the pot with the water slowly getting hotter and not jumping out. Hindsight is 20/20. 3mo
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megnews
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BilboBookends
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“Human cruelty has its limits-at least I thought so at the time.”

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megnews
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Mehso-so

The story of Helene Hannemann‘s kindergarten in the midst of the horrors of Auschwitz is an important one to tell. Unfortunately, I felt this book, with a plot at times disjointed, fell short. Conversations felt awkward & I wish characters were more developed, especially Helene & her children. Ultimately this book was between a so-so and a pan for me. I give it 2 1/2 ⭐️.

Still enjoyed #LullabyBuddyRead & can‘t wait to hear @sblbooks thoughts.

sblbooks I'm only on chapter 11, so far it's a so-so for me. I'll tag you when I review it though. 4mo
SaturnDoo I was wondering if anyone had finished,reviewed and discussed this yet. Although I haven't been here much,every couple days I would get on briefly and look at my notifications or see if I had been tagged 😂. Did I miss the discussion already? 3mo
megnews @SaturnDoo You didn‘t miss it. I posted ??? Sunday for conversation this week. I‘ll go tag you in it. Wasn‘t sure if you were still reading the book. Hope all is well! 3mo
sblbooks @SaturnDoo I just reviewed it. Looking forward to hearing your comments on the discussion questions. 3mo
SaturnDoo @sblbooks I just answered the questions 😊 3mo
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sblbooks
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megnews
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megnews
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megnews @sblbooks are you interested in doing another buddy read next month? If so, I can post some options 4mo
sblbooks Sure 4mo
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sblbooks
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Chapters 1 through 6 finished. I like it so far, a bit of a slow start. Im looking forward to part 2. #lullabybuddyread @megnews @SaturnDoo @Crazeedi

megnews I agreed with @SaturnDoo that it had a choppy start. I felt maybe the author was rushing through where some details could have been added. But chapter 6 seemed better so I‘m still hopeful and it‘s an important story to know. I‘m looking forward to the second part as well. (edited) 4mo
SaturnDoo @megnews I'm starting chapter 6 now. Yes, the author is rushing but not really giving us any "new" story that other authors haven't already told. The first chapters were very simplistic/common knowledge, so I'm hoping from this point on the importance of this story will begin to unfold. 4mo
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megnews
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megnews
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sblbooks
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#lullabybuddyread I finished the first two chapters in Auschwitz Lullaby. I really like the quote by Elie Wiesel, found in the front of the book. @megnews

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megnews
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#LullabyBuddyRead starts today! It‘s not too late to join us. Follow the suggested schedule above or read at your own pace, posting quotes & blurbs along the way, tagging @sblbooks & me. Discussion questions last week of August.
I‘m diving in now!

Crazeedi I'm still waiting for the book, hopefully very soon!! 4mo
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megnews
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Reminder: #LullabyBuddyRead starts a week from today. Suggested schedule posted above but feel free to read at your own pace. Post quotes & blurbs throughout. Tag @sblbooks & I so we can follow along. Discussion questions week of August 25.

If you like #historicalfiction there‘s still time to grab your book and join in.

sblbooks I've got my book, and I'm ready to go. 4mo
Dragonfairykats This book is on Kindle's Daily Deals today 4mo
megnews @Dragonfairykats thanks for the tip! My ebook was supposed to be available in a couple days but at $2.99 I just bought it. I also bought The Librarian of Auschwitz for $2.99. 4mo
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megnews @Crazeedi Are you joining us too? 4mo
SaturnDoo I got my book from the library a few days ago so I'm ready to go too @sblbooks 4mo
Crazeedi @megnews I want to! I have to get book, haven't been on here for 4 days! Thanks for invite!! 4mo
27 likes7 comments
review
xxjenadanxx
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Pickpick

Book 2 of #24in48 @24in48

The true story of an (aryan) mother doing her best to protect her (gypsy) children in a Nazi concentration, or rather extermination, camp. A great read that will leave you a bit in awe of her strength and love but mostly heartbroken at the cruelty of humanity. Even now history repeats itself.

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sblbooks
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For anyone who loves #historicalfiction or #WW2 @megnews had a great idea to do a #lullabybuddyread for the tagged book. See her post for more information. I'm looking forward to it. All are welcome.

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megnews
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@sblbooks and I are doing a #buddyread of Auschwitz Lullaby in August.

Anyone else care to join us?

Suggested schedule posted above. Feel free to read at your own pace, faster or slower.
Post Quotes & Blurbs throughout and don‘t forget to Review.
I‘ll post discussion questions the week of 8/25.

Don‘t forget to use #LullabyBuddyRead and tag me, @megnews & @sblbooks in your posts.

Anyone‘s welcome to join. Let us know if you plan to.



sblbooks I ordered my book yesterday, it should be here in a day or two. 5mo
megnews @sblbooks awesome! I put the ebook on hold with the library. Will be in about the time we start. 5mo
SaturnDoo My favorite genre ❤❤❤❤☺ 5mo
megnews @SaturnDoo have you read this one? Join us! 5mo
SaturnDoo @megnews no I haven't...I have the book in transit from one library to my library...so it should be here in a day or two 5mo
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Momma_Jo
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One good mother was worth more than the entire murderous machine of the Nazi regime.

(I just finished this cross stitch for my niece who was born in May. Figured it fit my last quote that I wanted to share from this book.)

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Momma_Jo
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Pickpick

This book was absolutely amazing. I have read quite a few historical fiction books based on real stories from the WWII era. This one shook me to the core in all the best ways possible. So many quotes that just hit home for me. I highly recommend it to anyone who is searching for a thought provoking review if the human condition during this era.

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Momma_Jo
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All human beings are irreplaceable, of infinite value, and nothing can substitute the life that is taken.

brit91 Beautiful and touching picture!😍😢 5mo
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Momma_Jo
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Evil is much bigger than an antisocial behavior or a psychological deficiency. Above all it is a lack of love for one's self and for others.

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Momma_Jo
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For men, killing and dying for ideas may come naturally. For us bearers of life, to murder for ideals is the worst aberration created by humankind.

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suvata
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Pickpick

I bought this book because it was one of the daily Kindle specials. It was the best $1.99 that I ever spent. It is a WWII novel but it is told from a completely different perspective than any other WWII books that I‘ve read. This book is a novelized version of the true story of Helene Hannemann. Helene was a German woman married to a Gypsy man. In May 1943, she and her five children were sent to Auschwitz.

Crazeedi I may have to look into this one.... 6mo
sblbooks @Crazeedi You should join us for the #lullabybuddyread in August. 4mo
Crazeedi @sblbooks that would be fine what book are you reading? 4mo
sblbooks @Crazeedi See the post on @megnews page. We are going to read 4mo
Crazeedi @sblbooks thank you 4mo
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JulieHartman419
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Pickpick

Read this book! One of our librarians told me to read this on several occasions. I finally read it was fabulous!!!! It is the true story of Helene Hannemann. She was a German nurse married to a Gypsy musician with 5 children, including one set of twins. She voluntarily went to Auschwitz-Birkenau when her husband and children were taken, because she wouldn't let them go without her. She became a favorite nurse of Dr. Josef Mangele's. Fabulous book!

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Bourriquet76
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75th read of 2018, maybe the last? Still have two more days.

Eggs Was it good? 11mo
kstadt929 Oh my! I need to read this!!! 11mo
Bourriquet76 @Eggs I enjoyed it, besides it being sad. 11mo
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Insightsintobooks
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tammysue
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Pickpick

I‘ve been down with a viral bug all week + finally felt well enough to pick up a book last night. I got in 6 hrs reading time + completed 1 book Auschwitz Lullaby.
Helene mother of 5 + German prisoner runs the camps Romani daycare and school overseen by Mengele himself. Amazing, highly recommending!!! (Suggest: read w/The Tattooist of Auschwitz both true stories + prisoners at Auschwitz during the same time period)

#24B4Monday @TheReadingMermaid

KathyWheeler I didn‘t know about this book. I‘m definitely adding it to my TBR. 1y
romanceaddict @whatshesreadingnow I hope you continue to feel better. 👍 Added to my growing list of must reads 📕 1y
Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks I hope you feel better ❤️❤️ 1y
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tammysue @romanceaddict @Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks Thank you so much Misty and Susan.. I don‘t remember ever being that sick. I‘ve missed everyone and so happy to be back!! ❤️🤗 1y
Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks @whatshesreadingnow so glad you are feeling better 😘❤️ 1y
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bookishkris
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I‘m on a WWII reading frenzy lately. I don‘t know why; every book makes me cry.

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