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humouress

humouress

Joined April 2018

I read mainly fantasy, YA, a touch of SF. Also some golden age mysteries. On LibraryThing as humouress
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humouress
Faery Lands Forlorn | Dave Duncan

(Book 2 of ‘A Man of His Word‘ series)

I‘m re-reading this series after a few decades and finding it a bit grittier than I remembered. I think I was seduced into buying the series by the covers on the Del Rey 90‘s editions by Don Maitz

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The Last Dragonslayer | Jasper Fforde
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humouress
The Last Dragonslayer | Jasper Fforde
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I‘m half in love with the Quarkbeast - but then, I‘m biased. Our own, personal Quarkbeast. I tried to get him to show his teeth, but he was far more interested in what was going on in the kitchen behind me.

Another series where Jasper Fforde‘s protagonist is female.

humouress Still reading... I‘m hoping that Jennifer can save the last unspoiled wilderness in the unUK. Living in Singapore, I see the green spaces - which up to a few years ago were carefully marked out - being slowly eaten away by large, fairly ugly-looking buildings... (edited) 1mo
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humouress
The Gossamer Mage | Julie E. Czerneda

Leksand ducked his head, giving his mother a worried glance. Kait carefully didn‘t smile. “Go on, then,” she advised her son. “It‘ll be a longer trip if you don‘t talk.”

SweetBooks 😂 1mo
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review
humouress
The Gossamer Mage | Julie E. Czerneda
Pickpick

This one made me cry; she writes the mother-child bond beautifully, not with sentimentality but with a no-nonsense love. Absolutely spot on.

‘Leksand ducked his head, giving his mother a worried glance. Kait carefully didn‘t smile. “Go on, then,” she advised her son. “It‘ll be a longer trip if you don‘t talk.”‘

Some issues with half sentences, but I can live with that. Also with the elegant tattoos which unfortunately obscure some words.
5*****

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humouress
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Well my reading mojo started coming back but then Life interrupted - we‘re truly in the run up to GCSEs now.
Chapter 10: there was an instance of déjà vu that I had forgotten; I wonder if it will be addressed (specifically) later?

humouress If you pay attention to the chapter headings, the icon helps identify the POV. Points of view are going to multiply from here on, as the original Two Rivers Party splits up and meets more people (some equally important to the prophecies) 3mo
humouress I like the way the Emond Fielders often refer new things back to the way someone did something at home or life in the Two Rivers. Hmm; (ch15) could be our world and con trails? 3mo
humouress Ch 20: An inn called ‘The Nine Rings‘, named for one of Rand‘s favourite adventure stories. A Tolkien homage? 3mo
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humouress
Saturdays at Sea | Jessica Day George

Carrying on with the ‘Castle Glower‘ series. While I like it, weird accents and all, I wish the girls would stop screaming. Two chapters in and it‘s looking like the 12 year old protagonist might be feeling the first fluttering of ‘luurve‘ which I‘m not too keen on; when I was that age, romance fell firmly into the icky category.

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I‘ve just started ‘The Great Hunt‘ for the Wheel of Time group read.

I‘d like to know more about Tam al‘Thor‘s younger days and how he came to have a heron-mark sword.

rachelm Sounds good! 3mo
humouress I‘ve read ‘The Eye of the World‘ 3 or 4 times but it‘s only the 2nd time for this. Taking me a while to get into it. The 1st was obviously 1st in a trilogy but already this is slowing. Taken Rand 4 chapters to hide from the Ads Sedai. Also, there‘s less anticipation for me. 3mo
charl08 Love the cushion! 3mo
humouress @charl08 That‘s my book seat. Very handy when I get too tired to hold my book myself 😄 3mo
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This description of Phryne Fisher‘s destination in the opening chapter of ‘Urn Burial‘ made me giggle. Especially Dot‘s reaction after everyone else‘s.

humouress In the first chapter, within half a page, we get three characters called Lin Chung, Li Peng and Lina. Fortunately there is a whole cast list of characters (literally - they‘re listed at the beginning of the book) so these three don‘t get confused. 3mo
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humouress
Seeker's Bane | P. C. Hodgell

(To Ride a Rathorn pg 796]

Sheth Sharp-tongue to Jame:

‘Now, did I or did I not request that you not break any more instructors?‘

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humouress
Seeker's Bane | P. C. Hodgell

Two chapters in and Jame‘s new quarters have already been set on fire. This time, not her fault, for once.

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Seeker's Bane | P. C. Hodgell

Re-reading ‘To Ride a Rathorn‘ because I didn‘t review it last year. A small thrill just picking up ‘Seeker‘s Bane‘; love Hodgell. I love her instances of quirkiness. A page in and I know I‘m on Rathillien. I‘m pretty sure catfish don‘t head for the hills on our earth when there‘s an earthquake.

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Six of Crows | Leigh Bardugo

There‘s been a big build up to the secret of Kaz‘s past with ominous hints. Now it looks like I‘ve got to that part ... and I‘m dreading it :0/

humouress ...It was okay, I survived; I held my breath and read as quickly as I could. At least there weren‘t any torture scenes. 4mo
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humouress
Six of Crows | Leigh Bardugo

Similar to ‘Lies of Lock Lamorra‘; gangs in a port town. Main characters are similar age to my kids but these are far, far older. Kaz Brekker is not a sympathetic character. Not a YA book. Didn‘t really grip me until about half way through, when we got some background as to why/ how each of the six joined the Dregs gang, but am enjoying it more now. Reading this for my book club as a stand alone (duology) in the ‘Grishaverse‘ series.

julesG It takes a while to get going. And, a lot of people agree, those characters are at least 10 years older than what is said on paper. I wonder whether Bardugo had to change their age to make the book YA. 4mo
Shley9225 @julesG I dont think these characters have to be 28 to act the way they do in this book. They were forced to grow up early and learn to survive but it‘s not like teens can‘t act this way or be in a gang or be ruthless, talented, or intelligent. She didn‘t “have to change their age” to make it YA, this is the age they were meant to be and it‘s part of who they are in the story. And I absolutely believe this book is still YA despite its dark themes. 4mo
julesG @Shley9225 The characters don't really have a teenage brain. That's why they seem older. 4mo
humouress I agree, they‘re forced to act older but can be teenagers (ran out of space in my 1st post). 4mo
humouress As for YA, my 10 year old reads YA and I wouldn‘t want him to read about gouging out eyeballs (however much he might relish it), or even my 15 year old (if he read). 4mo
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humouress
Blue Sword | Robin McKinley

pg 9: ‘She had always suffered from a vague restlessness, a longing for adventure that she told herself severely was the result of reading too many novels when she was a small child.‘

I empathise.

pg 20: ‘Its twisted shadows had always been welcome to her; when she grew older she liked the feeling of great age that the forest gave her, of age and of a vast complicated life that had nothing to do with her and that she need not try to decipher.‘

charl08 Ha! Is that what caused it... 4mo
humouress @charl08 😄 I didn't see that; I was just listing quotes I liked. 4mo
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Wednesdays in the Tower | Jessica Day George

Am enjoying the ‘Castle Glower‘ series but am finding the constant small screams for no reason a bit disconcerting.

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Tuesdays at the Castle | Jessica Day George

Children‘s, fantasy

Similar to the ‘Ascendance Trilogy‘ which I‘ve just completed in that they both have young protagonists, there is a question of succession and the threat of invasion by neighbouring countries. This, however, is fantasy where the Castle is aware and is taking a part in the proceedings - although how much is not known, even by the characters who have grown up within its walls.

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humouress
The Raven Tower | Ann Leckie

Narrated by a god to one of the characters in second person (get your head around that!) it‘s an interesting take on the evolution of the world. The god (as far as I‘ve read) hasn‘t moved from the time they gained awareness although the world has changed around them. They narrate their story to ‘you‘ in flashbacks while also recounting their first encounter with ‘you‘.

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humouress
The Raven Tower | Ann Leckie

Just starting this one. Much as with her ‘Ancillary Justice‘ series Leckie throws you in at the deep end - and her deep ends have unusual currents. In this case, the unknown narrator addresses you and tells you ‘your‘ story from their perspective.

rretzler Hey! How have you been? Glad you‘re reading this book. I can‘t wait to hear what you think. 6mo
humouress Oops, sorry. My Litsy presence tends to be rather patchy. I actually really liked ‘The Raven Tower‘. You‘ll have to look at my LT thread for my review though I‘ll try and put one here and post it to the main page on LT 5mo
rretzler Just as an FYI, on Litsy when you respond to someone who is commenting on your thread you have to use the @username in order for them to see it. You don‘t have to do that it you are replying on someone else‘s thread, which is why I don‘t need to use @username in this post, but you would to respond. It‘s a little confusing until you get used to it and I‘m always forgetting! I think you can double tap on the comment you want to reply to also 5mo
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humouress
Cloud Roads | Martha Wells
Pickpick

I really enjoyed this book. I like Wells's world building and the way that humanoids are all different from the humans that we're used to. It gradually dawns on you you're in the Three Worlds (water, earth and sky). The terrain Moon covers is familiar, but there are also flying islands and mushroom-creatures that run away. There is a long history to this world but other than providing abandoned ruins to shelter in it isn't relevant to this story.

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humouress
Cloud Roads | Martha Wells
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Pickpick

Groundlings come in different shapes, sizes, colours. But Moon is different - he can shift shapes and fly. He discovers he is a Raksura and joins the Indigo Cloud court. But he has spent all his life hiding what he is. So he finds it difficult to trust. And the Raksura of Indigo Cloud are suspicious of him, a solitary male.

Meanwhile, there are political manoeuvrings between the queens and the Fell seem to have an unholy interest in the court.

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Getting back to reading ‘The Eye of the World‘ (about a third of the way through).

There are ominous dreams, myths turn out to be real and insidious Dark Friends can reach you, even when you think you are safe. It makes me feel uneasy for the fate of our heroes and heroines.

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humouress
The Cloud Roads | Martha Wells

Still enjoying reading about Raksura.

However - I don‘t know if it‘s differences between English and American or the editing - but past tenses keep sticking out and snagging my attention, like ‘weaved‘ instead of ‘woven‘ or ‘sunk‘ instead of ‘sank‘. It may just be that I‘m super sensitised because I have two school-going sons who constantly use the wrong words. I didnt have this issue with ‘All Systems Red‘ (also read on Overdrive).

rretzler That would drive me crazy too, so I don‘t think it‘s due to the differences in language. 9mo
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humouress
The Cloud Roads | Martha Wells
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Raksura! Wind-ships!
I‘m up to chapter 9. Moon is still trying to find his place in the Three Worlds and additionally, something sinister threatens the Raksura of Cloud Indigo. Like the way courts are named for a colour and a sky icon. Was worried about a potential ‘love at first sight‘ situation but Wells is too accomplished an author for that.

rretzler Sounds like a good one - I have yet to read Wells, but am looking forward soon to Murder-bot! 9mo
humouress She characterises personal dilemmas well. 9mo
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humouress
The Cloud Roads | Martha Wells

(Reading as an e-book on Overdrive)
Chapter 3: Moon has just met a Raksura. Quite amusing. I‘m imagining Raksura as winged lizards - maybe even dragons. Nice to see no humans although all the characters seem somewhat humanoid.

rretzler I‘ve been meaning to start reading Martha Wells soon. 9mo
humouress You should; I‘m enjoying it. 9mo
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humouress

‘...legend fades to myth ...‘ Up to Ch 12: Rand, Mat, Perrin and Egwene have no choice but to leave the Two Rivers in the dead of night in the middle of the coldest winter they‘ve known, in fog and with only two strangers out of legend to protect them - assuming they can be trusted. The boys have explored further than most people they know, but this is the furthest they‘ve ever been and only Egwene has wanted to adventure beyond the Two Rivers.

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Choice made. Re-reading this for the LibraryThing group read of the series and am up to chapter 3.
I like the way all the references are tightly local; anyone suspicious is like a Taren Ferry man - Taren Ferry being a day‘s journey or so away. Or, since the Coplins are a family of ne‘er do wells, any foolish talk is ‘like Coplin talk‘.

humouress While I do like the cover, there are some details that are wrong; Moiraine should have dark hair, unbraided, hanging in soft ringlets and the girl in the background (whether Nynaeve or Egwene) should have dark hair, braided. And Moiraine‘s horse should be a lot taller. (edited) 10mo
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Choices, choices ...

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Unfortunately, my e-book (published by Straw Hat) has a few spelling mistakes, namely letter substitutions; ‘h‘s for ‘b‘s, ‘m‘s for ‘rn‘s

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Starting ‘Ghostly Term‘. Rebecca is now exactly the same age as my eldest son with both starting their GCSE year. Exam pressure!

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‘Now consider the tortoise ... It has about as good a turn of speed as you need to hunt down a lettuce.‘

‘Gravity is a habit that is hard to shake off.‘

‘Time is a drug. Too much of it kills you.‘

And I see Cut-Me-Own-Throat Dibbler‘s distant relative has made an appearance. (But why did Om end up as a tortoise? Is there a higher being - that maybe he could pray to?)

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humouress
The Runaway King | Jennifer A. Nielsen
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I‘m two thirds of the way through and I want to know what happens next. But I‘m getting nervous because it could all go wrong at any second now and I don‘t want to read about it. Ohhh - the tension!

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The Runaway King | Jennifer A. Nielsen
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Sage wants to protect Carthya from the Avenian pirates, so he decides to try and join them.

Sage‘s continuing adventures, while improbable in real life, the way he gets out of tight situations, are still enjoyable. His brash character helps him. I do admire his dedication and determination to do the best for his country even though he wasn‘t trained for it. It does lead him to unconventional solutions.

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I hope my ten year old son would get the irony of this if he read ‘Nevermoor‘!

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Rebecca‘s friend Mara has only been allowed to come back to school with a bodyguard as her father fears she may be kidnapped and Mara is rather upset about it all.

From an adult‘s point of view, I think she‘s being rather spoiled; but then her father is a billionaire, I suppose. I‘m with Lucy, who‘s been cast as the villain of the piece.

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Morrigan Crow is cursed to die soon. Her father ignores her and the town blames her for every little misfortune so she constantly has to write apology letters. But her date of death is imminent - will things change drastically? Just started this book. Liking the heroine and her feisty attitude. Reminiscent of ‘Magic Thief‘ (Sarah Prineas)

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Rebecca Mason goes into the third year at school. This year the girls can go to dances with boys but Rebecca wants to focus on tennis and try to make the County team

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humouress
Red Rising | Pierce Brown
Mehso-so

2/2
There are a few quirks in the writing that I had to get used to.

Darrow did adapt easily to given that his family had lived for generations in only one place - a mining colony under the crust of Mars

There is a lot of casual violence; goats, sheep, horses, humans, a planet are dispatched with less than a flick of a sentence even when they are not being used as food.

Small quibbles, however. Overall, well written and compelling.

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humouress
Red Rising | Pierce Brown
Mehso-so

1/2
Darrow is a miner on Mars. They are the pioneers, so that the other colours can join them from Earth. But the planet has already been terraformed.

Tragedy impels him out of his tier in Society to be altered and trained to be a gold by the Sons of Ares, whose purpose is to destroy the system. The narrative tells of his training and his initiation into the ranks of those attempting to become the Peerless Scarred - the very highest of the high.

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The Magic Thief | Sarah Prineas
Pickpick

Light, solidly written, engaging

Conn picks the mage, Nevery‘s, pocket. Nevery has returned to the city of Wellmet as its magic has been dwindling. Conn feels he is destined to be a wizard and help Nevery save the magic.

I'd like to continue reading this series of Conn, his grumpy master Nevery and their friends.

I quite like Prineas's hyphenated vocabulary : 'Nevery swept-stepped from the room' or 'he gave me his keen-gleam glance'.

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Red Rising | Pierce Brown

A little disorienting as it‘s written in the present tense and in the first person. I‘m halfway through and there‘s a bit more injustice, tragedy and violence than I‘m used too. But I still want to find out what happens next.

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Red Rising | Pierce Brown

Currently about a quarter way through. I‘m not a fan of tragedy or injustice but I suppose both of these early on are what drives the novel.
Darrow is a Helldiver, the most daring of the helium-3 miners on Mars, of the Red caste. The Reds are constantly told that the helium they are mining will terraform the surface of Mars and then the other colour castes will join them and they will all live in comfort. But Darrow discovers it‘s all a lie.

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Juvenile fiction, beautifully written. Engaging. Reminiscent of L.M. Montgomery‘s ‘Blue Castle‘ about the wonders of nature. Set in early 20th century in Brazil.
Hoping we get to find out more about Maia‘s parents.

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humouress
Diplomatic Immunity | Lois McMaster Bujold
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Pickpick

Miles, as Imperial Auditor, has to sort out a problem in quaddie-space

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Bitterblue | Kristin Cashore
Pickpick

3rd in the ‘Graceling‘ series. About friendship. Very nice

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Bitterblue | Kristin Cashore
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Almost halfway through ‘Bitterblue‘ and thoroughly enjoying it. I think it‘s the way Cashore portrays friendships that has me hooked.

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humouress
The 13-Storey Treehouse | Andy Griffiths
Mehso-so

(Borrowed as an e-book from the library.)
Checked this out for my 9yo. Silly, imaginative fun; I mean, there‘s a tank full of man-eating sharks in the treehouse. The writer and illustrator put themselves in the story and it‘s fun reading their banter

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Ship of Magic | Robin Hobb

I have ‘Ship of Magic‘ lined up; the first in the ‘Liveship Traders‘ trilogy which follows the ‘Farseer Trilogy‘ but with a different set of characters and the action moved down the coast to Bingtown.

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I must say Rachel has more stamina than me be able to walk straight off a long haul flight into a hawker centre. Good call on Lau Pasat Satay Club.
Must check out this Sembawang place ...

It‘s fun spotting landmarks that I recognise. Though I don‘t know where in Singapore Mr. Kwan found rolling parklands, even behind the Botanic Gardens.

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Rachel and Nick have just arrived in Singapore. It doesn‘t mention the way the humidity hits you as you step onto the aerobridge. And then ups it a notch as you enter the arrivals hall. But that has nothing on when you leave the building and wonder how you‘re going to survive the five minutes until you can collapse into the air conditioned comfort of your car.