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#Poetry
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GatheringBooks
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blurb
Graywacke
Possession | A. S. Byatt
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Two weeks and one day out

Our plan

July 7: chapters 1-5
July 14: chapters 6-10
July 21: chapters 11-17
July 28: chapters 18-21
August 4: chapters 22-28
#byattbuddyread

jewright Could I join this, please? 2h
Librarybelle Looking forward to this! 2h
See All 7 Comments
Tamra 👏🏾👍🏾 2h
slategreyskies I‘m excited about this one! Thanks! 2h
Graywacke @jewright of course! 46m
Deblovestoread I‘d like to join in if this is ok? 25m
20 likes7 comments
review
mabell
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Pickpick

Well this was a cute surprise! I didn‘t realize I was adding a summer version to my Night Before Christmas collection. 😄 A great story to read before a summer trip. Ending lines - “ I heard Jimmy ask as we drove out of sight, “Mommy, are we there yet?” She said, “With luck, by tonight.” 😂
#TwastheNight

MaureenMc How cute! 2h
mabell @MaureenMc The rhyming is so fun to read, too 😄 8m
9 likes2 comments
review
Kenyazero
Dear Mothman | Robin Gow
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Pickpick

I read this back in March for #TransRightsReadathon and really enjoyed it. Naturally, I didn't read the description before diving into what I thought would be a fluffy book, so I was blindsided by the intense portrayal of childhood grief. I loved the exploration of identity and friendship, as well as exploring social life on the autism spectrum. I didn't realize it was a novel in verse because I listened to the audiobook. #LGBTQIA

Kenyazero Used for #OwlHouseReadathon Hooty: Penpals; #LGBTQBookBingo2024 #LGBTQIA2024 Poetry In Motion; and #GottaCatchEmAll @PuddleJumper Lapras: There is a journey and Set near a body of water, which catches Lapras! 3h
PuddleJumper Yay! Amazing! 3h
9 likes2 comments
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AllDebooks
Figuring | Maria Popova
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#LitSolace #MidsummerSolace

Are you feeling a bit stuck in a rut and in need of inspiration? The Marginalian published a great essay on habits and patterns. Well worth a read and a save.

https://www.themarginalian.org/2019/01/21/shakespeare-hamlet-habit/?fbclid=IwZXh...

review
amw40488
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Pickpick

Faerry's tattoos are really intriguing to me. Not only do his self-inflicted scars serve as a kind of tattoo, but his actual tattoos (like the apple, the corpse flower, etc.) give us clues regarding the fairytales that he and Whimsy will come across in their journey through Sorrow's Garden. All of Faerry's physical marks are symbols of his physical and mental battles with depression. These were small but very meaningful details, in my opinion!

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amw40488
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Part 2, Chapter 9 was so beautifully written, but so gut-wrenching and emotional. Whimsy and Faerry's encounter with Sorrow painted a poignant picture of the self-doubt and inner demons that Whimsy and Faerry struggle against. This chapter handled their depression very well, and though it was tough to read because of the heaviness of the topic, I think McBride broached the topic with great respect and sensitivity. Very good writing!

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amw40488
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Not only is the writing style of this novel very interesting, but I am also captivated by how Whimsy processes her thoughts--even the thoughts she can't vividly recall. We experience the same gaps in her memories as she does, which is a fun experience as a reader. Being in her head also helps to make sense of how her depression affects the way she views the world and how it may tinge her memories of the Forest/Garden in certain ways.

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amw40488
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About halfway done with this novel! So far, I am finding myself most intrigued by the vivid imagery and the style of writing. The imagery is setting up a really interesting world within the novel, and I'm enjoying the exploration into Whimsy's mind. The style of writing makes this novel's world feel sort of hazy and dreamlike, which I think fits with the illusiveness of the Forest. Excited to read more!

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BC_Dittemore
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Pickpick

I think you could call Crane a poet‘s poet. His work is steeped in metaphor and analogy, made more difficult to a modern day reader by the gap in eras. There is little here to grasp a casual reader. Yet there is an instantly recognizable power to his poems. Despite the lengths one must go to decipher what Crane is ‘saying‘, one can FEEL it all the same.

An undeniable talent who went with his best work still locked inside him….