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The Storm Before the Storm
The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic | Mike Duncan
15 posts | 12 read | 32 to read
The creator of the award-winning podcast series The History of Rome and Revolutions brings to life the bloody battles, political machinations, and human drama that set the stage for the fall of the Roman Republic. The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. Beginning as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome gradually expanded into a wider world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic kings. Through the centuries, Rome's model of cooperative and participatory government remained remarkably durable and unmatched in the history of the ancient world. In 146 BC, Rome finally emerged as the strongest power in the Mediterranean. But the very success of the Republic proved to be its undoing. The republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled: rising economic inequality disrupted traditional ways of life, endemic social and ethnic prejudice led to clashes over citizenship and voting rights, and rampant corruption and ruthless ambition sparked violent political clashes that cracked the once indestructible foundations of the Republic. Chronicling the years 146-78 BC, The Storm Before the Storm dives headlong into the first generation to face this treacherous new political environment. Abandoning the ancient principles of their forbearers, men like Marius, Sulla, and the Gracchi brothers set dangerous new precedents that would start the Republic on the road to destruction and provide a stark warning about what can happen to a civilization that has lost its way.
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review
KimM
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Pickpick

Very interesting account of Roman history from the creation of the republic to the beginning of the end with the empire.

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mhillis
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Storm Before The Storm was a book club choice. I didn‘t know much about Roman history, so I wished this book would have had a timeline or chart that I could have referenced! There are several interesting parallels between the events and ideas in this book and the present, so we had a great discussion!

Crazeedi Stacking because I love reading this kind of book!! 6mo
mhillis @Crazeedi The author also has a podcast The History of Rome 🎧 6mo
Crazeedi @mhillis I will definitely look for it! TY! 6mo
See All 6 Comments
RaimeyGallant The title confuses me, so I would probably get lost in the timeline. :) 6mo
Crazeedi Hi Mary!! I'm on your team!! Whoohoo! I joined at the last minute, and I'm hoping to cheer my teammates on!! 6mo
mhillis @Crazeedi Yay!! It‘s going to be so much fun! 6mo
64 likes2 stack adds6 comments
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AthenaWins
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Pickpick

Wow. As a lover of Roman history, I've always been curious about what led up to the Roman Republic failing and transforming into the Roman Empire. Mike Duncan took me from the beginning of the end to the next beginning with so many awesome characters. Whoever says history is boring hasn't paid attention to the oversized personalities of the past. They are what fictional characters should aspire to be.

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AthenaWins
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It's 81°f in South Louisiana. So I'll just read outside while I wait for my delivery.

RadicalReader @AthenaWins love your mindset totally perfection I‘d happily be doing the same thing lol 10mo
36 likes1 comment
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AthenaWins

"Surprisingly, there has been much less written about how the Roman Republic came to the brink of disaster in the first place--a question that is perhaps more relevant today than ever. A raging fire naturally commands attention, but to prevent future fires, one must ask how the fire started."

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RamsFan1963
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Pickpick

A fascinating look at the transition from the Roman Republic to the Roman Empire. It's very hard not to notice parallels between current American politics and those in ancient Rome. Human history does seem to cycle around and around. 5 💥💥💥💥💥 out of 5.

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RamsFan1963
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Book: Exiles At The Well of Souls
Author: Harlan Ellison (RIP)
Movie: Escape From New York
Food: Eclairs
#MANICMONDAY @JOSCHO

JoScho Thanks for playing ❤️ 1y
14 likes1 comment
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ralexist
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Pickpick

The more I read of history the more I realize how little I know of the world. Packed full of stories and details, my favorite tidbit from this is the fact that if Julius Caesar hadn't had some mad networking skills to get himself off a massive kill list the course of history would've run very differently (I think there's the making of an alt-universe novel in that somewhere). Great listen and some interesting parallels if you can spot them.

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helgagrace
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Pickpick

A pretty accessible work on the beginning of the end of the Roman Republic. Adapted from a podcast (I listened to the audio). It made me want to listen to SPQR again!

Lindy @helgagrace SPQR has so much in it, I‘m sure I would retain new things with every re-listen. 2y
RamsFan1963 I have this in my non-fiction TBR stack, I'm glad it's interesting. I read SPQR awhile back. 2y
77 likes5 stack adds3 comments
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Mcroft2552
Pickpick

Fun and enjoyable read as the reader travels through Rome‘s not so well known aspect of its history. The books reads like a story with some familiar names and some not so familiar ones. Sometimes the people are just introduced for a line or two then they disappear along with Rome‘s republic, but overall great way to introduce yourself to Roman politics and history

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Sydsavvy

“Reflecting on the recurrent civil wars of the Late Republic, Sallust said, “It is this spirit which has commonly ruined great nations, when one party desires to triumph over another by any and every means and to avenge itself on the vanquished with excessive cruelty.”
― Mike Duncan, The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic

BookHermit Sounds about right. 2y
33 likes1 stack add1 comment
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Sydsavvy

“But this was an age when a lie was not a lie if a man had the audacity to keep asserting the lie was true.”
― Mike Duncan, The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic

Knightingale Why does that sound familiar? 2y
Sydsavvy @Knightingale 😂😂😂yeah, I have no idea. 🤔 2y
JaclynW @Knightingale So very familiar! 2y
33 likes1 stack add3 comments
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catiewithac
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Mehso-so

I went the audiobook route with this history of the late Roman Republic. I was not very familiar with the politicians featured (this is right before Caesar and Augustus). Unfortunately, I HATED the author‘s voice (he‘s famous for a history podcast). His voice was tinny and annoying. I just prefer narrators with English accents whose deep voices resonate with solemnity. Be prepared for a lot of Latin names!!! 🗡

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melissajayne
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I am a big fan of the author's two podcasts, The History of Rome and Revolutions. THoR was one of the first podcasts I subscribed to.

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MrBook
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#TBRtemptation post 1! To be released soon. For 400 years, the Roman Republic never had a single person at its helm. Elected consuls would peacefully hand power to the the next and so on. When the Republic exploded with its growing Mediterranean empire, political conflicts and civil wars. This book focuses on 133-80 BC. What parallels can be drawn with today: political polarization, corruption, quagmires, etc.? #blameLitsy #blameMrBook 😎

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