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aartichapati

aartichapati

Joined December 2019

Avid reader, committed to reading diversely, special love for SFF and history, but read across genres
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The Mirror and the Light by Hilary Mantel
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aartichapati
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Pickpick

Really beautiful and intricate storytelling in only 100 pages! I wish it was longer. Loved the setting and the characters and the way the author unwrapped the story. Can‘t wait to read more by her.

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aartichapati
Pickpick

This one was so fun! Really hilarious, engagingly written, and did so well bringing Ancient Rome to life. Highly recommend!

MallenNC I want to read this one! I heard about it on a Book Riot For Real podcast. I'm glad to hear it is written in a fun style. 3y
14 likes1 comment
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aartichapati
The Mirror and the Light | Hilary Mantel

“I know,” Gregory said amiably. “My tutors have imbued me with it, from my earliest days. Do not talk about severed heads at a wedding.”
Forgot how much (dark) humor Hilary Mantel injects into these books! 😂

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aartichapati
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Pickpick

This one was really fun! Quite different than I expected, but a cool mix of folk tale and sci fi. Also mostly light and (possibly tried to hard to be) funny, which is much needed these days!

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aartichapati
Mehso-so

Was not at all impressed with the mystery or drawn in by the characters, but I did appreciate the setting in Malaysia and learning more about the dual court system there.

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aartichapati
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Pickpick

Wow, this one was beautifully written, captured the voice of a child so well, and tackled a devastating topic around children from the slums who go missing in India. Read it in a weekend, which does not happen very often for me any more. Highly recommend.

ChaoticMissAdventures This is one of the few I grabbed from the library before they closed! Excited to calm down enough to read it. 3y
aartichapati I just got it from the library, too! Though Chicago libraries remain open at this time, I believe. Not sure for how long... 3y
21 likes2 comments
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aartichapati
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Thanks for the tag, @NeedsMoreBooks

- How I'm feeling: honestly, pretty anxious about a global pandemic and whether the US is doing enough to stop the spread (pretty sure it is not). Also really sad that it seems to be every country for itself vs a coordinated effort by all.

What do I read: just the act of reading helps :) about to start the tagged book

Best thing: hanging out with my niece and nephew! 🥰

@MoonWitch94 #thoughtfulthursday

NeedsMoreBooks Thank you for playing! Yes, reading itself is therapeutic 💖 3y
MoonWitch94 Reading is my therapy sometimes. We have to take care of ourselves in this crazy, crazy world. Thanks for playing ❤️🌷🦋🌸📚 3y
16 likes2 comments
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aartichapati
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Mehso-so

This was a nice read about women working in silk factories in China in the 1920s and 1930s. I appreciated reading about all the very different types of lives the women had before coming to the silk business, but felt the lack of depth in character development. The book was more a series of vignettes vs a strong plot and story, which was nice but not as impactful as I wanted.

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aartichapati
Disoriental | Ngar Djavadi
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Pickpick

Such a beautiful story about an Iranian girl growing up during tumultuous times - coming of age, coming out, and coming to terms with her family‘s and her country‘s past.

25 likes1 stack add
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aartichapati
Pickpick

Really enjoyed this one and the author‘s awakening to her own biases. So eye-opening and an excellent work to understand the impact America has on the world and other people.

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aartichapati
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Pickpick

Really enjoyed this one! Has pretty strong world building for a novella, and the setting in an alternate 1912 Cairo, in a world on the cusp of social change, is so fascinating. Also enjoyed the mystery aspect and the way Egyptian culture was deeply woven into the magic and story. I hope there is more to come in this world!

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aartichapati
Atlas Alone | Emma Newman
Bailedbailed

I loved every other book in this series but just could NOT get into this one. Most of the plot seems to take place in an immersive RPG, and I was not really into that. Loved every other book in the series, though!

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aartichapati
A Black Women's History of the United States | Kali Nicole Gross, Daina Ramey Berry
Pickpick

This was excellent and sweeping! Loved hearing american history from a different perspective, and so inspiring for all the work to do. Recommend reading this with the 1619 Project, they complement each other very well. And for another lens on american history, The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee is great!

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aartichapati
Six of Crows | Leigh Bardugo
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Mehso-so

Ooh, a fantasy heist novel! I was excited to read this one because the GoodReads reviews are ON FIRE. It was a pretty enjoyable read, though it dragged in the middle for me. Also, the main characters are all supposed to be 17, but they don‘t act that age at all - I just pretended they were 10-15 years older, and they made much more sense. Ends on a cliffhanger - luckily, I have the second book.

ozma.of.oz I had that exact same problem! None of them acted like teens. I still really enjoyed this one and the sequel though! 😂 3y
aartichapati @ozma.of.oz yes, it became too much for me when they met “a boy” who was 15 and acted as though they were all shocked and could not hurt such a young kid 😂 3y
30 likes2 comments
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aartichapati
Spin the Dawn | Elizabeth Lim
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Mehso-so

So hard to rate this one as it felt like two different books. The first part, with a competition and hidden identity and jealousy and such, was really good and held my interest! But the second part felt like a completely different book (kind of like The Poppy War), with most characters disappearing and a romance taking center stage. It dragged for me, and the character development mostly stopped. I will read the sequel, but am not antsy for it

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aartichapati
Priory of the Orange Tree | Samantha Shannon

I am 300 pages into this one and losing steam (with another 600 pages to go!) I feel like I should be far more moved by some of these character deaths and these tense scenes, but I really am not. For those who enjoyed it - did you love it the whole way through, or was there a tipping point? For those who didn‘t enjoy it - do you feel the same way? Did it improve at all?

sudi I enjoyed it, only because the story finally made sense towards the end. But yeah, the first half is stretched way too much, but the 2nd half was only a little better. To be honest, if Ead is one of your favorite characters then you should consider sticking with it, otherwise don't feel guilty about bailing on this one. 3y
aartichapati @sudi thank you, that is very helpful! I set it aside for now. I was expecting more dragons :) 3y
12 likes1 stack add2 comments
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aartichapati
Before Mars | Emma Newman
Pickpick

I am completely devouring this series! And Before Mars is my favorite of the three I have read to-date. Such an excellent story about how women are often made to doubt themselves and their experiences, and about the conflicting feelings around marriage, parenthood, and so much more. So good!

17 likes1 stack add
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aartichapati
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Mehso-so

Enjoyed learning more about O‘Connor, but this was lighter than I wanted. It didn‘t really give details or depths to major decisions she made, and spent more time on her private life than I expected. For a more detailed review, see my post on IG, handle aartireadsalot

Velvetfur Great photo 😊👍 3y
aartichapati @Velvetfur thank you! Trying harder on those :) 3y
21 likes2 comments
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aartichapati
The Gone Dead: A Novel | Chanelle Benz
Mehso-so

It is probably unfair to compare this author to Attica Locke, but I LOVE Locke‘s stories set in the rural Deep South, and it is hard for other authors to match her. I listened to this on audio, and it was so good at setting the scene, but the story was not quite there for me - too many POVs in the telling, I never felt like I knew the characters well enough to care a lot about them.

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aartichapati
Such a Fun Age | KILEY. REID
Pickpick

Wow, this book packs a punch. The author described it as a “comedy of good intentions,” and that describes it very well. A 20-something black woman babysits for a well-to-do white family and starts dating a white guy, and it seems like everyone wants to prove to her just how woke and down-to-earth they are. She just wants to figure out her life and spend time with her (pretty awesome) friends. The satire is on-point - really enjoyed the audio!

20 likes1 stack add
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aartichapati
After Atlas | Emma Newman
Pickpick

Wow, this book is like a punch in the gut. Emma Newman is a real master at portraying characters who are still dealing with the aftershocks of trauma, and in showing how trauma can keep coming back to you. The technology and environment in this was so well-developed, and the mystery very well-plotted. Similar to the first book in the series, the ending seemed to come out of nowhere. But definitely plan to read more in Planetfall!

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aartichapati
Planetfall | Emma Newman
Pickpick

I enjoyed most of this book. Appreciated that the protagonist was a 70-year-old biracial, bisexual woman - so rare to see older women as the lead in stories! I also think the author did a really nice job of bringing anxiety to life. Wasn‘t a huge fan of the ending, but looking forward to reading more by Newman.

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aartichapati
Pickpick

Truly enjoyed this memoir about Bharara‘s time as a federal prosecutor and what justice means to him. He is so thoughtful in sharing the thought process behind his own actions and the consequences they had and detailing some cases that stood out to him.
I loved the way he finished the book with a story about forgiveness and the hope and wisdom that people can have and the strength and spirit we bring to the practice of law.

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aartichapati
Girl, Woman, Other | Bernardine Evaristo
Pickpick

Loved this book!! Was not sure I would enjoy the writing style, which has limited punctuation, but once I got in the flow, I loved its poetry. Such a celebration of the diversity of experiences we all have in life, and of seeing others as they want to be seen.

BkClubCare Whoa ; fast read? (How are you liking Litsy?) 3y
aartichapati @BkClubCare I think it took about a week. It probably could be read really fast but I did one section a night because it was just lovely to read. As for Litsy, think I am still getting the hang of it, but it is really fun to see so much book chatter! 3y
17 likes3 comments
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aartichapati
Girl, Woman, Other | Bernardine Evaristo
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♥️ inclusivity

RaimeyGallant Can't wait to read this! 3y
aartichapati @RaimeyGallant I really enjoyed it! I do wish we got more time with some characters, there are a lot and I definitely had my favorites. But all of them were so different and the writing was so poetic, which was lovely. 3y
BkClubCare I can‘t wait for this one! 3y
12 likes1 stack add3 comments
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aartichapati
Girl, Woman, Other | Bernardine Evaristo
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That feeling when you finished a really good book today but won‘t get your massive library haul until tomorrow, and you know you should not start a new book now but you also don‘t know what else to do so you look for the shortest books on your bookshelf and realize you read them all before because this is not the first time you have been in this situation.

rather_be_reading hate hate tht! 3y
BkClubCare LOL! But also 😢 3y
16 likes2 comments
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aartichapati
The Kingdom Of Gods | N. K. Jemisin
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Pickpick

Read the whole trilogy in a very short time and will likely now have a book hangover. I think the first book was my favorite, I didn‘t love the third book nearly so much, though I think it was much more mature and reflective. This series, above all, is about loneliness and finding your people. And realizing m your people are not always who you would expect them to be and are not always deserving of your love, but having hope for them, anyway.

StillLookingForCarmenSanDiego Love Jemisin. I still need to read the last book, must bump it up the tbr. 3y
aartichapati @StillLookingForCarmenSanDiego it is a really lovely and melancholy ending to the series! 3y
16 likes2 comments
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aartichapati
Alexander Hamilton | Ron Chernow
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Pickpick

Key takeaway for me was that the America was extremely fragile at the start, and there was no great belief that it would succeed, but it did. America came into being DESPITE massive differences of opinion. once everyone came together & compromised, they went to their corners and started vilifying each other. This country has been on the brink before and it will be on the brink again, but it is only as strong as its informed and active citizens.

BkClubCare Is it something like a reassurance that the world and humankind has always been tragedy-prone? 3y
aartichapati @BkClubCare something like that, coupled with knowing people have made it through worse periods and somehow came out the other side with hope and action 3y
BkClubCare @aartichapati ♥️ I know what you mean. 3y
21 likes3 comments
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aartichapati
Every Heart a Doorway | Seanan McGuire
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Mehso-so

While reading reviews for The Ten Thousand Doors of January, this series was mentioned a lot because it is also fantasy about different worlds accessed through doors and portals. I read this one and part of the sequel/prequel on audiobook, though, and just wasn‘t drawn in or entranced by the characters or the story or the worlds. I think I‘ll give up on these and move onto other fantasy novels!

Karisa I liked the concept of that series a lot. In my opinion the first one was the best. 😊 3y
aartichapati @Karisa yes, concept is so cool! I think it made me think the stories would be a little more lighthearted but they were not really that at all. But love the idea! 3y
kristenm And I liked this series far more than the Doors book, especially McGuire‘s writing. I read them first though. 3y
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aartichapati @kristenm I can definitely see liking this one more than that one - they are very different in style and form! 3y
kristenm @aartichapati Yeah, I read a surprisingly high number of “magic doors” books so I have high standards for that scenario. ;) 3y
aartichapati @kristenm you have a type! 😂 3y
23 likes6 comments
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aartichapati
The Odd Women | George Gissing
Pickpick

This is one of those books I purchased on the recommendation of a friend and then allowed to languish on the shelf for years. To be honest, I picked it because I wanted something short. This was weightier than expected, with surprising but amazing commentary on women‘s roles in the late Victorian era. George Gissing was a feminist who thought deeply about the roles and restrictions his world offered and wrote a compelling and empathetic novel.

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aartichapati
The Odd Women | George Gissing
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Never had it occurred to Widdowsdon that a wife remained an individual, with rights and obligations independent of her widely condition. Everything he said presupposed his own supremacy; he took for granted that it was his to direct, hers to be guided. A display of energy, purpose, ambition, on Monica‘s part, which had no reference to domestic pursuits, would have gravely troubled him.

MidnightBookGirl Love that bookmark! 3y
Karisa Wow, written so long ago but still true for many today! 3y
aartichapati @MidnightBookGirl thank you!! My parents got it for me when they went to Australia 3y
aartichapati @Karisa yes, it was very relevant, especially on gender roles and how those impact power in relationship. 3y
11 likes4 comments
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aartichapati
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Mehso-so

Found this one disappointing. It is about Shirin, a Muslim-American girl trying to get through high school in a very racist town in the year after 9/11. But it is mostly an angsty YA romance novel, and one in which the (white athletic) guy‘s feelings and experiences seem to be explored far more than the (hijab-wearing minority) girl‘s.

BkClubCare Interesting cover 3y
12 likes1 comment
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aartichapati
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Pickpick

This does an excellent job of shifting perspective on American history, putting Native Americans at the center and changing the way we view America itself and how inevitable the whole takeover of the continent feels to us today. What I ❤️: Treuer makes clear that Native Americans were not passive victims, but that they have used (and continue to use) every available resource to fight for their rights.

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aartichapati
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Pickpick

I enjoyed this book far more than I expected! I went into it thinking it would be a pretty light young adult fantasy about a girl growing up and discovering herself along with new worlds. And it is that, but it also explores the impacts of colonialism and racism, how love can inspire and hurt, and the deep and powerful nature of words and books. I really enjoyed the story and all the characters. It was an excellent fantasy winter escape.

LoverOfLearning I've never really read fantasy books before I read this one. I was not expecting to like it as much as I did. I loved the romance and adventure seeking aspects of it. But yeah there was that element of fear and abuse that make the book deep and complex. Loved it. 3y
aartichapati @LoverOfLearning yes, that is a really good way of putting it! I admit that the story within a story dragged a bit for me, as did the section in the asylum, but those are pretty small complaints, really! Looking forward to more by the author. 3y
LoverOfLearning Fair point. I liked the story within the story. Yeah great debut by the author! 3y
16 likes3 comments
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aartichapati
Priory of the Orange Tree | Samantha Shannon
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Just bought this behemoth because winter is my season for epic fantasy reads! Though I admit that the size of this one does intimidate me (it‘s even longer than the Hamilton biography! 😱) That said, I love that the whole story is in one book - often hard to find in fantasy!

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aartichapati
BTTM FDRS | Ben Passmore, Ezra Claytan Daniels
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Hoping to finish Alexander Hamilton and read this “gentrification horror” comic book set in Chicago before the end of the year! #wintergames #merryreaders

Amiable Good luck! I read “Hamilton” this year, too. To be honest, I preferred Chernow‘s “Washington: A Life.” Hoping to get to “Grant” in the next year. 3y
aartichapati @Amiable good to know! I have both of those on my list, I think Chernow has a really engaging writing style. Based on how he describes Washington in this book, I think it would be interesting to see the relationship and events from that perspective. Also if he were to write about Jefferson! 3y
AvidReader25 Welcome to Litsy!!! 3y
5 likes3 comments
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aartichapati

Listening to this while I cook and clean. An interesting mix of personal histories beside bigger picture histories. I am enjoying it but probably not ideal for audiobook, at least for me.

Velvetfur I love having audiobooks (and podcasts) on while doing chores, it makes it all go a bit quicker! 😁 3y
ljuliel Welcome to the gang. Good to see some more nonfiction ! 3y
aartichapati @Velvetfur same! Though I admit that sometimes I space out and then am not entirely sure what is going on 3y
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aartichapati @ljuliel thank you! Yes, as I get older, I read more and more non-fiction. Mostly history and sociology and sometimes science - what about you? 3y
Velvetfur @aartichapati Totally agree! That's why I don't listen to audiobooks while out walking anymore, far too much visual distraction! 😂 3y
ljuliel I‘d say I prefer nonfiction , but lately, I‘ve been on a fiction binge. I read almost everything , other than romance or sci-fi. If you‘re not already, give @Amiable a Follow. She picks some cracking - good nonfiction books ! 3y
aartichapati @ljuliel thanks for the tip! 3y
Amiable Thanks, @ljuliel ! And welcome, @aartichapati ! I‘m a huge nonfiction fan —about 50% of my reads every year are nonfiction. Feel free to tag me in your nonfiction recommendations! 3y
aartichapati @Amiable I would definitely recommend this one. I think especially towards the end, it is really interesting to learn about how people are keeping up their culture while working to expand their rights within the US system. Some of it did drag a bit for me in the middle, but I think that may have been because I listened on audio. 3y
5 likes1 stack add9 comments
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aartichapati
Alexander Hamilton | Ron Chernow

And because parties were frightening new phenomena, they could be easily mistaken for evil conspiracies, lending a paranoid tinge to political discourse. The Federalists saw themselves as saving America from anarchy while Republicans believed they were rescuing America from counterrevolution. Each side possessed a lurid, distorted view of the other, buttressed by an idealized sense of itself.

BkClubCare I have this to my dad and still waiting for him to give it back to me! 🤣 3y
aartichapati Well, it is MASSIVE, so possibly he is still making his way through it! And what‘s funny is, you can tell that Chernow did his best to summarize some things as concisely as possible. Hamilton just had a VERY full life! 3y
4 likes2 stack adds2 comments