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tenar

tenar

Joined March 2019

all my reviews are belated, and I‘m just happy to be here. (they/them) storygraph says: reflective, informative •nonfiction •nature •scifi •classics
review
tenar
Beauty is a Verb: The New Poetry of Disability | Sheila Black, Jennifer Bartlett, Michael Northen
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Beauty Is a Verb‘s preface seriously intimidated me, with academic terms & references to disabled poets I‘d never heard of. I‘m very glad I stuck with it! Each poet has their own introduction, and I connected to so many who showed me brand new ways of thinking and experiencing. Flipping back through, I‘m amazed at how much I learned and felt in this one collection. It‘s like the poetic version of how I felt after the 5⭐️ essay anthology About Us.

tenar A delightful ambassador of the collection: “Poems with Disabilities” by Jim Ferris https://www.amnesty.org.uk/files/2019-01/Poems%20with%20Disabilities%20by%20Jim%... #DisabilityReadathon 2mo
Nute This is why I read, Leah, for the exact words that you said, for “brand new ways of thinking and experiencing” everything. I want to hear the voices of disabled poets. I want to grow and learn in every good way possible because of believing that every story is important and deserves an audience. 2mo
tenar @Nute Oh, you‘ve given me goosebumps! I believe that, too, and I love how you put it. I think you‘ll find some of what you‘re reading for in this collection ♥️ 2mo
Nute Stacking and will be looking for this book the next time that I am at the bookstore. Then we can chat!🙂 2mo
30 likes2 stack adds4 comments
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One for All: A Novel | Lillie Lainoff
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For a few reasons, including that I‘m not at all hip to current YA, it‘s hard for me to judge this book. But I don‘t think I need to: if this story sounds up your alley, I‘d bet it is! One for All is a gender-bent retelling of The Three Musketeers, with not only dueling but dancing; equal parts sword fights and seduction. The central characters are four girls who all have boundless courage, tremendous loyalty, and weapons under their skirts. ⤵️

tenar It‘s also the first novel about a character with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), a common, difficult, and often misdiagnosed illness that affects me, the author, (the audiobook narrator!) and millions worldwide. As the author writes, the teenage protagonist having POTS is the least fantastical element of the story. But never having seen this part of myself on the page, it did feel more than a little magical. #DisabilityReadathon 2mo
Kimberlone Fantastic cover! 2mo
Christine Sounds great, and thanks for sharing what it means to you. Stacking! :) 2mo
tenar @Kimberlone I thought so, too! @Christine Thanks for being interested in what it means to me! I hope you enjoy your time with it! ❤️ 2mo
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Judith Heumann‘s autobiography is written in plain language, but with those everyday words she and her co-writer tell a damn good story. Heumann helped spearhead the longest sit-in protest in a US federal building, when - in the year of our lord 1977 - the US government was, in their own words, considering creating a “separate but equal” standard for disabled citizens. As a polio survivor used to fighting for her rights, Judy wasn‘t having it.

tenar If you‘d like to learn about the 504 Sit-In, a historic and successful protest for civil rights made possible by cooperation among disability activists, a rogue journalist, churches, a machinist‘s union, and the Black Panthers, this book is a great way to hear the story from the inside. Another great way is to catch the documentary Crip Camp, featuring Judy, on Netflix! #DisabilityReadathon 3mo
charl08 Such a great book! 2mo
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Today I have 4 recommendations from my favorite books that fulfill quite a few challenges in April‘s #DisabilityReadathon!

•The group read is Disability Visibility, which contains some of the best disability writing I‘ve ever read.

•A poetry collection, from a deaf author: The Perseverance by Ray Antrobus. Explores biracial identity, a difficult father relationship, & deaf experiences. The most memorable contemporary poetry I‘ve read in a while.

tenar •By an autistic author, middle grade, and from the reading list: A Kind of Spark by Elle McNicoll. An autistic girl fights for a memorial commemorating women tried as witches in her town. Loved it.

•A book centered on invisible disability: The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elisabeth Tova Bailey, on fatigue, snails, and meaning-making. A post-viral memoir, which I believe is an experience we should all take the time to understand these days.
3mo
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The Sirens of Mars interweaves the memoir of planetary scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson with the history of our search for life on Mars, charting the great leaps in our knowledge of the planet, both thrilling and devastating.

It‘s brief, and I didn‘t learn as much as I wanted to about our red neighbor, but I did enjoy the rather poetic peek at why planetary scientists have for so long devoted themselves to studying places they could never reach.

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Seven Days In June | Tia Williams
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The April #DisabilityReadathon is coming, and I can‘t wait! Link to the official site and unofficial StoryGraph challenge in the comments. The goal is to connect with the voices of disabled creators, however that works for you. #OwnVoices!

The prompts I chose:
•A poetry collection, Beauty Is a Verb.
•About invisible disability, The Invisible Kingdom.
•Written by an autistic author, Diary of a Young Naturalist.
•And a romance, Seven Days in June!

Christine This sounds great - going to check it out! 4mo
tenar @Christine Wonderful, I hope you find a fabulous read! P.S. I would‘ve stacked The End of Bias on your recent post, but when I pushed the icon I found I already had it stacked 😅 That shows you had a great review and my TBR is out of control! 4mo
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Christine LOL - that so often happens to me, too! My TBR is ridiculous, but I still love adding to it. 4mo
ncsufoxes Oh, I would love to do this but my April is looking a little too busy. I‘m going to try because my stack of books related to disability history/justice/stories has continued to grow. 4mo
tenar @ncsufoxes I get you; I think my TBR here is more aspirational than I‘d like to admit. I hope you can join the fun, though, and there are prompts on the official site that take less time than reading a complete book, if that helps. But any month is a great month to read on disability! ☺️ 4mo
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The Iliad | Homer
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After fourteen intense hours, I‘m proud to say I read The Iliad! I‘d not been exposed to it before, and I was as intimidated as I was intrigued. I thank y‘all who read things like Homer and Shakespeare so casually here on Litsy; you make me feel like I can, too.

Caroline Alexander‘s translation was much more readable than I expected, and I found the extended similes exquisitely beautiful. My favorite part was meeting the disabled god Hephaestus.

Amiable Great job! Congratulations! 4mo
LeahBergen Woohoo! 👏🏻👏🏻 4mo
Suet624 I agree that others make it look so easy. 😎 congrats! 4mo
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tenar @Amiable @LeahBergen @Suet624 Thank you! I‘ve read more and more widely since joining Litsy; y‘all are good influences 😉 4mo
batsy Yay! I have this translation and I'm looking forward to tackling it sometime soon 🙂 4mo
tenar @batsy Can‘t wait to hear what you think! I obviously have nothing to compare it to, but I found this one not only easy to read but easy to imagine performed, which delighted me. 4mo
Hamlet Congratulations! I also love big epic similes & am excited for this translation. Well done. You‘re a fearless reader now! 4mo
tenar @Hamlet Your comment really made me smile!! ☺️ I hope you enjoy Alexander‘s take on the fabulous similes! 4mo
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A breakdown of the convergence of racism and sexism experienced by black women across US history. I‘m blown away by the clarity of the writing. hooks wrote this, her first feminist work, as a student with her uninitiated mom in mind. She‘s so successful in opening her ideas to a wider readership that I think you could‘ve handed this to me as a teen just starting to understand feminism, and I‘d have gotten it. Plain statements of complex ideas.

tenar I‘m not on board with her decision not to use citations, and this was extremely heteronormative, but I‘m interested in going on a journey with bell hooks as her ideas grew with time. Next up, 4mo
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How Do You Live? | Genzaburo Yoshino
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I expected to love this: classic JPN lit, fiction plus nonfiction, up for Studio Ghibli adaptation. I was excited by the idea of an ethics book for young readers within a relatable middle grade story. It‘s all those things, but it didn‘t live up to my dreams. The dazzling opening and a moment with mom near the end touched me, yet other chapters lost sparkle and one was so wishy-washy I wasn‘t sure it was saying anything at all. Uneven but unique.

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Crippled | Frances Ryan
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Crippled, recording the extreme impact of Britain‘s welfare cuts on its disabled population, is the kind of reporting that‘s so damning it should‘ve changed everything.

The UN has called the situation “a human rights catastrophe”, and this short book illustrates clearly, with both personal stories and data, that when a range of services are cut, it creates a cumulative effect in which the most in need will experience the greatest deprivation.

tenar Key to the story is how the gutting was paired with a narrative pushed by members of the government and media to vilify disabled benefits recipients, leading to an increase in hate crimes against the disabled and greater public tolerance of the “catastrophe”.

I learned so much about how welfare is eroded & what kinds of supports can be crucial to independent living. Thank you for the suggestion, @jenniferw88! Book 2 for #newyearwhodis #nywd2022
5mo
Bookwomble It's heartbreaking to see the devastation caused to the vulnerable in this country by a political party which just doesn't give a shit ☹ 5mo
tenar @Bookwomble It truly is. The stories in this book touched me! An interesting point made was how some of what we think of as natural vulnerability is created by policy - when stronger supports are in place, many more disabled people and their family members are able get an education and to work, which greatly lowers their economic vulnerability. 5mo
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Bookwomble @tenar Blaming the disenfranchised for their own difficulties is a favourite Tory tactic. It's weird that individual Tories can be really nice people, and then vote for such horrible policies 🤷🏻‍♂️ Saying that, I think it's an unfortunate human trait, rather than a specifically political one. 5mo
tenar @Bookwomble I agree. The book briefly touches on Labour‘s lack of counter-narrative to the “benefit scrounger” myth, and I read it like they don‘t know enough to have one. There‘s a lack of interest in learning about disabled people‘s needs across the board, and the disability rep in government is so low. Taking seriously a book like this, I think, would lead to improved policy ideas from all parts of the political spectrum. (well… I‘d hope🤞🏻) 5mo
Bookwomble @tenar I hope so, too 🤞🏻 (though it's telling that this is something we actually need to hope for). 5mo
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This book‘s lush writing and nonlinear flashbacks had me slowing way down. That paired wonderfully with its subject matter: Japanese gardens, tea making, reflections on memory. I learned so much history and culture, all while engrossed in its simmering story. Nestled in the gardens, in the memories, is a story of war - ways people are complicit, the human wreckage it creates, and how to live on after the worst has happened. Rich and tender.

tenar Thank you very much for the recommendation, @jenniferw88 #newyearwhodis #nywd22
Please carefully consider the content - atrocities of war - before reading.
5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage I loved this one but agree there are some very dark parts. (edited) 5mo
monalyisha What a gorgeous review! 5mo
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tenar @BarbaraTheBibliophage I loved it, too! And I had to set it down and take a little break at one point. @monalyisha Thank you! A gorgeous book makes it easy. 5mo
Suet624 You‘ve captured the essence of this book beautifully. 5mo
tenar @Suet624 Thank you! I was just admiring your review of The Sentence. 5mo
Centique Oh beautiful review! I loved this book so much. I think I‘ll reread it 😍 5mo
tenar @Centique Thank you very much! I‘m not even a big rereader, but I can see myself picking this one up again. 5mo
Brimful I loved this book so much! 3mo
tenar @Brimful I still find myself thinking about it! 3mo
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Untitled | Unknown
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Despite loving the work on disability I‘ve read, last year I was often swept up by more popular books. So, I‘ve resolved to read a book by and about people with disabilities or disfigurements every month. And here are the nominees! 👏🏻

A diverse anthology, a meditation on blindness, an activist‘s autobiography, candid essays on schizophrenia, a painter‘s life with spina bifida born 1958, and a ‘YA memoir‘ on coming of age with facial difference.

ncsufoxes Being Heumann was very good, she has lead such an amazing life. The Collected Schizophrenias was really good too. 5mo
tenar @ncsufoxes Awesome! I picked these from a wider collection at my library based on hearing the best responses from other readers. I‘m planning to finish Crippled by Frances Ryan this month and start with Being Heumann in February. You‘ve got me even more excited! Edit: Also I‘m glad to say Demystifying Disability isn‘t in this group because there‘s such a long line for it at my library! Really pleased about that. (edited) 5mo
mandarchy The Collected Schizophrenias is really good, it's a great first hand description of the experience of having symptoms of psychosis. I took issue with the author's exceptionability. Most people with Schizophrenia can't self reflect and have no idea that their thinking is out of the norm. She's a genius and writes very well. 5mo
tenar @mandarchy Sounds like an interesting read, and good reminder! The way ‘exceptional‘ stories self-select is something I think about with physical disabilities - I have a story to tell that I haven‘t seen told, but, like many others, I‘m not well enough to write it. So whose stories get written? It‘s certainly worth keeping in mind with regards to mental illness, too, and, really, all our stories. 5mo
mandarchy @tenar well said! I try to accept exceptionability because it's received well and hopefully opens doors. We have to remember that most people who are successful are somehow exceptional. Maybe it's our measure of success that needs to be calibrated? 5mo
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A Room of One's Own | Virginia Woolf
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Take a walk, have a luncheon, and re-examine history with Virginia Woolf in A Room of One‘s Own.

Despite holding awfully lofty ideals on writing, Woolf here takes a grounded look at the realities of (note: white) women‘s lives, from her 1920s to Shakespeare‘s day. She advocates for women‘s financial independence and, perhaps, even basic income! I‘m enjoying her nonfiction, as she is fabulous company, with her love of literature and sparkling wit.

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Quicksand | Nella Larsen
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A partially autobiographical first novel, Quicksand is very raw in its telling of Helga Crane‘s increasingly desperate search for belonging.

Larsen described this short book as “the awful truth”, and whether it‘s Helga or Nella speaking, it‘s gripping and honestly heartrending reading such an articulate woman‘s words on being biracial in the 1920s. I wouldn‘t pick this over Passing, but its powerful ending may haunt me even longer.

Suet624 Ooohhh, great review. Stacked! 6mo
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Piranesi | Susanna Clarke
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Most of this fantastical novel made me awfully melancholy. The protagonist is sensitive, and I related to how well he did in his own world, and how easily his equilibrium was dismantled by the outside. But by the book‘s ending I felt healed, one of my favorite reading feelings.

Reflecting on the author‘s long illness gave this work many shades of meaning. How vivid was the House, the mystical, marble setting - its ins and outs, tides and seasons!

batsy Lovely review. You've hit on several aspects that made this an excellent read. 6mo
tenar @batsy Thank you so much! I hoped to convey some of what made the book special without spoiling any of its mystery. 6mo
Suet624 I just saw your review. I loved this book so much and you've done a wonderful job reviewing it. 6mo
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tenar @Suet624 That means a lot to me, thank you! ❤️ I‘m so glad you loved the book, too. 6mo
Palimpsest I love this book. Great review! 5mo
tenar @Palimpsest Thank you very much! It‘s a special book, for sure. 5mo
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I‘m late to the fabulous party; here‘s my #Top21of21. It‘s been too fun to browse! Thank you tagging me, @Nute!

Size very, very vaguely corresponds to ranking. Honestly, it was so hard to figure out who made the cut that it could be a different list on a different day. (See many others‘ top hits for books that could have been included, like Project Hail Mary, The House in the Cerulean Sea, and multiple Becky Chambers!) What a great reading year.

tenar I noticed while posting this that all four books I read by Ursula K. Le Guin this year are here. She‘s become a serious contender for favorite author status, a spot currently held by Natsume Soseki. Maybe there‘s room for two at the top! 6mo
Cinfhen A bunch of your books are on my #ReadersRadar for 2022!!! Super excited 😊 Thanks for posting and tagging ♥️ 6mo
Bookwormjillk A Raisin In The Sun has been a favorite of mine since my mother brought me to see it in high school. Great list! 6mo
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BarbaraBB Great choices. I loved The Housekeeper and the Professor 🤍 6mo
merelybookish This is a great list! Sister Outsider is so good. I was thinking of reading more Lorde in 2022. 6mo
Liz_M Carmella! 6mo
charl08 Fascinating list! I'm really enjoying seeing what everyone has rated this year (making my wishlist grow though!) 6mo
tenar @Cinfhen That is exciting! I hope you enjoy any of them your try. Thank you for making this tag; it was so fun! ♥️ 6mo
tenar @Bookwormjillk Since its reputation proceeded it, I thought I knew a bit of what to expect (plus seeing lots of clips of Sidney Poitier, hah). But the depth of it! Especially in the female characters - I was so moved by Beneatha. It‘s a fabulous play. What a nice memory to have with your mom! 6mo
tenar @merelybookish Right? I just read her introduction to The Cancer Journals as part of an anthology and was so impressed once again. Definitely hope to read more from her in 2022! 6mo
Suet624 I've never read any LeGuin. Looks like I have to get started! 6mo
tenar @Suet624 Thinking of you reading Le Guin gives me a thrill! I don‘t know how often you read sci-fi or fantasy? But I think she came from a family of anthropologists and writes about her imagined worlds in a way that might interest you, where we learn about them while learning about ourselves. She also wrote nonfiction and poetry. Let me know if you get curious 🤓 I‘m excited to sit down this week and figure out what to read from her next! 6mo
Suet624 I‘ve taken a screenshot of the ones you‘ve read so I‘ll remember which ones to look for. Your description is enticing. 6mo
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Ill Feelings | ALICE. HATTRICK
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Ill Feelings is part illness memoir, part diary of famous women‘s illnesses, part investigation into the medical controversy around chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS).

It‘s messy, circular, ruminating. It‘s also the first thing to ever move me to write for myself about my own illness. It put words to things I haven‘t known how to, those words coming not only from Hattrick, but across time, from Elizabeth B. Browning, from Virginia Woolf. Magical.

EvieBee Intriguing! I have to read this! I don‘t stack here but just know that I‘m buying. 6mo
tenar @EvieBee Thanks for leaving the comment! ❤️ I‘m at a weird place with this book in that I don‘t think I‘d recommend it to every reader, but at the same time I want everyone to read it. I hope you take something meaningful from it! 6mo
EvieBee I know exactly what you mean. 🤗 6mo
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Carmilla | Joseph Sheridan LeFanu
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As one of the oldest vampire fictions, this novella predates Dracula! Hugely gothic, with a picturesque and isolated setting, Carmilla describes a surprisingly sapphic central relationship. Though there are precious few frightful scenes, they lit up my imagination like a cat‘s eye in the dark. Not a mystery, as any modern reader will understand what‘s happening from the start, so just come for the fun. (I read this aloud, and we had so much fun.)

tenar SPOILERS: Some parts of the vampire myth here seemed certain to become iconic, yet I had only seen them in this work. The ghost-like abilities, and especially that coffin full of blood! 😱 Belated #Victober 7mo
LeahBergen Great review! 7mo
Emilymdxn I've got this sitting on my kindle and I'm so excited to read it on a cold winter night - perhaps eating somethign decadent with a big glass of red wine... 7mo
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wideeyedreader This is one of my favorite vampire stories! A must-read for vampire fans imo! 7mo
tenar @LeahBergen Thank you! I think the more jazzed I am about a book, the easier I find it to review. 7mo
tenar @Emilymdxn That‘s the perfect setting! 😍 If you have the time, I think this would be fabulous to read in one sitting. 7mo
tenar @wideeyedreader Absolutely! I feel the same way after reading and can see myself recommending it often. 7mo
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The Cancer Journals | Audre Lorde
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Special arrival! I was introduced to both Virginia Woolf and Audre Lorde this year and couldn‘t believe my luck when I bumped into this unique collection from Dutch publisher HetMoet. 🙏🏻 It reprints Woolf‘s essay On Being Ill and Lorde‘s intro to The Cancer Journals with essays on illness from contemporary writers, some translated.

Hopefully I‘ll have thoughts (and links to read some of these pieces online?) worth sharing in a follow-up post.

Suet624 I could have used this book when I was so ill with Lyme Disease. 7mo
tenar @Suet624 Right? I‘m delighted to read this now, but it would‘ve been more impactful earlier in my illness journey. I see recovery narratives most often, which bring hope, but I needed more than hope, I needed literature on how to live with illness in the moment. I know Lyme Disease is challenging; I hope you‘re as well as possible this holiday season ❤️ 7mo
Suet624 You‘re exactly right. I needed help, not just hope. After 7 years of struggling I‘m happy to say I‘m doing quite well. I hope you are too. 7mo
tenar @Suet624 I‘m so glad to hear that. I‘m not physically at my best, but I‘m happy to say I‘m mentally doing very well. Thank you, and thank you for sharing with me! 7mo
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A #Victober surprise! I picked this up after reading a few of its lines on the Welsh countryside- ah, the gorse and heather. Its nature imagery is luscious, and the land is truly the heart and soul of the novel.

The simple religious and romantic plots are enriched by the care taken in developing the full family dynamics of the Owens of Garthowen. A gentle story that weighs up thoughtful questions about duty, longing, and our faith in one another.

tenar P.S. I would like to thank this book for healing the festering sore in my heart that was left earlier this year by Willa Cather‘s O Pioneers!. 7mo
Suet624 💕💕💕 7mo
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New Year Who Dis? | Bitchy Fits
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Our #NewYearWhoDis matches are out, thanks to host @monalyisha, and I‘m delighted by my list from @jenniferw88. Like, one of my favorite niche topics is nonfiction about the author‘s relationship with birds, and you hit it. What are the odds? I can‘t wait for the new year!

These 6 reads are just scratching the surface for options to pick up in January; it‘s such a deep list, I‘d like to keep reading from it as the year goes on. I feel spoiled 😌

monalyisha OoOOo. Have you read anything by J. Drew Lanham? I just added a couple of his books to my TBR recently. They look so good! 7mo
tenar @monalyisha What a timely question! I haven‘t yet, but I have his book The Home Place on this month‘s TBR for #NonfictionNovember (which will likely run over into December, hah). I hope we both love his work! 7mo
monalyisha Me too! I'll be watching out for your review (in addition to all of the #NYWD22 reviews come January)! 7mo
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jenniferw88 A good selection here! Glad you think my list will keep you going throughout the year - I have a feeling yours will too for me! 7mo
tenar @monalyisha Just wanted to update you, as I won‘t post a review, that I‘m dropping The Home Place at ~40%. I don‘t have anything negative to say about it; it‘s just been a family history with nature very much only as the backdrop, so it‘s not my type of book. I did come away really liking the author as a person, though! 6mo
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Untitled | Unknown
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Time for a readathon! I‘m going to join #NovelNovember with a simple goal: read at least one hour a day. I‘ve been neglecting reading for other hobbies.

I‘m delighted the Bookly app has added a readathon feature! Screenshot above, extra autumnal flavor not included. You enter the details yourself, and it will track pages, books, and/or hours read, and will keep a list of prompts. Love that app.

Thanks for hosting @Andrew65 🍁 Let‘s read!

Andrew65 I need to explore Bookly again, I used to use it a few years ago. Love the Readathon feature. Glad to have you with us, good luck 😊👍 8mo
tenar @Andrew65 I find having stats really motivates me to read, so I love it! Good luck to you on your overlapping readathons! 👏🏻 8mo
Andrew65 @tenar Thanks 😊 I agree, the stats do the same for me. (edited) 8mo
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Untitled | Unknown
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Here are 6 books I‘d love to read for #NonfictionNovember but maybe won‘t, due to an imminent Animal Crossing update 😅

Vanguard is our #SheSaid bookclub read, spotlighting black women who fought for the vote! Underland is “an exploration of Earth‘s underworlds”. Hideous Progeny examines disfigurement in classic horror film. The Home Place is a birding memoir on black identity. Rising is climate journalism & Science Friday‘s book club read. 👇🏻

tenar And Ill Feelings by Alice Hattrick is my most anticipated. It‘s a multi-genre book exploring 'unexplained‘ illness, particularly ME/CFS. The blurb hooked me, “[This] collective biography of illness branches out into the records of ill health women have written about in diaries and letters. The cast of characters includes Virginia Woolf and Alice James, the poets Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Emily Dickinson…”! 8mo
fredthemoose Great list!! 8mo
Lesliereads I enjoyed The Home Place. 💕 It was a little uneven but I was into it. 7mo
tenar @Lesliereads I‘m delighted to hear that! I hadn‘t bumped into many people who have read it. I anticipate being into it, too. 7mo
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The Moonstone | Wilkie COLLINS
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My second Wilkie Collins, and though it didn‘t live up to The Woman in White, there‘s a lot here to enjoy for the detective fan! As one of the earliest in the genre, it helped codify many tropes, like the reenactment of the crime. A good mystery.

Once again Mr. Collins‘ characters express sexism, racism, & ableism throughout, yet once again he has written “exceptional” characters into the novel that defy these stereotypes. An interesting author.

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Untitled | Unknown
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Dropping my usual TBR for Booktube‘s #Victober! It‘s my fav month, and my Victorian October read last year, The Woman in White, was a highlight of 2020.

We‘ll see how many I get to; most count for multiple prompts. For ‘Popular‘, I wanted to read a book more popular then than now and thought Anne Brontë‘s book fit the bill. I learned Charlotte stopped its later reprinting! For the bonus “read aloud” challenge, I‘ll read Carmilla to my mom ?

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Mrs. Dalloway | Virginia Woolf
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I finally picked Mrs. Dalloway up after falling in love with Woolf‘s essay On Being Ill. This novel‘s stream of consciousness is like what living is like, for me at least, where the clock chime pulls me from a memory, and a character is stumbling into the biggest questions while just waiting to cross the street. Somehow so relatable while incredibly specifically set in London, in 1923, in the shadow of the Great War. I liked this a lot! #Bookspin

TiminCalifornia Great review. 9mo
tenar @TiminCalifornia Thank you. I think really lovely books somehow rub off on their reviews! 9mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 9mo
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Foundation | Isaac Asimov
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I may like the idea of this book more than the reality of it. My teenage self set my Goodreads URL to /psychohistory, as I was fascinated by that fictional branch of mathematics which sets these stories in motion. On this reread, Asimov‘s predicted decline of the galactic empire by stagnation of investment in science felt more possible than ever, yet for every spark of my interest there was an equally deep waning as we skipped across time.

tenar This is unfortunate, as I consider myself a minor Asimov fan, and the Foundation series is my brother‘s absolute favorite! As my difficulty seems to be with execution rather than the ideas, I find myself looking forward to the upcoming TV adaptation! 9mo
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Frankenstein | Mary Shelley
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I read Frankenstein with an online class last week and was surprised by both the breadth of its themes and the depths of its tragedy. As an old epistolary monster tale, I expected suspense like Dracula, and this instead was like being beaten against a rocky shore by wave upon wave of misery! I enjoyed the interludes of alpine nature writing and comparing my 1818 edition w/ Shelley‘s edited 1831, in which she seemed to tone down her radical ideas.

beeweird "Wave upon wave of misery" is a great summary ? 10mo
tenar @beeweird I felt like I barely made it out alive! 😅 10mo
marleed I read this for the first time last October. I was surprised how much more I liked this book than any screen adaptation. 10mo
tenar @marleed It‘s so different. More sensitive, romantic, tragic. And I think that difference isn‘t just in the character of the monster, but in Victor! The book version of Mr. Frankenstein may be one of the most emotional characters I‘ve ever read. 10mo
marleed Completely agree! 10mo
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Untitled | Unknown
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I don‘t feel ready for September, but here it comes anyway! I do have a list, and I did read my #BookSpin (Wordslut) and #DoubleSpin (O Pioneers!) in August, but I didn‘t get a chance to gather my thoughts to post reviews.

Here are my 10 nonfiction & 10 fiction picks. Thinking about quickly swapping in a U.K. Le Guin. 😂 I‘ll definitely read Foundation by Asimov, in anticipation of the TV show, and Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde with #SheSaid!

TheAromaofBooks Yay!!! And I checked off that you finished your August reads, even if you don't get a chance to review them!! 10mo
tenar @TheAromaofBooks Thanks so much, and thank you again for hosting! I so enjoy playing along ☺️ 10mo
TheAromaofBooks I really love seeing everyone's lists and enthusiasm, even though it means I totally have added more books to my TBR than I've taken off! 😂 10mo
tenar @TheAromaofBooks Hahahah, same on both counts! 10mo
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I‘ve been enjoying watching the Paralympics and wheelchair basketball this week, so much so I started craving a book pairing. Found it!

The subtitle, “How Paralyzed Veterans from World War II Invented Wheelchair Sports, Fought for Disability Rights, and Inspired a Nation”, is so darn long in an effort to cover the many movements that trace roots back to these US & British veterans, including, it seems, the Paralympics! Can‘t wait to learn more.

Amiable That looks really good! Looking forward to your review. 10mo
tenar @Amiable Thanks, I hope I can heartily recommend it! ☺️ 10mo
Amiable @tenar I looked it up on Goodreads —it has a a really good rating. 10mo
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Accessible and very brief at under 200 pages minus footnotes! Each chapter could be fleshed out into its own book, for better and for worse. Takes care to illuminate history using individual people‘s stories, using quotes when possible, beginning at the earliest written record of the land. Intersectional, focused on communities and movements, with a mildly sardonic tone that took for granted that the reader respects disabled people. I liked that.

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Untitled | Unknown
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My August #BookSpin list, 10 fiction & 10 non-fiction. I‘m still deep in the airplane-mode-library-hole where all the ebooks I think I have are actually illusory.

I read 5 books off July‘s list and am meandering through 2 more, Miyazakiworld and Arsène Lupin. In August I‘m definitely reading the longest listed book, Children of Time 600p, with my scifi-loving mom, and Wordslut with the Litsy bookclub #SheSaid. Hoping to get to several more! ??

MallenNC I am often in airplane mode on my Ereader! Great list this month. 11mo
tenar @MallenNC I‘m glad to know I‘m not alone, hah! Thanks, and you, too. Interested in what you think of a lot of your list, especially 11mo
MallenNC @tenar It seems like all my holds come in at once and I think I just need a little more time! I‘m looking forward to How the Word is Passed. I already wanted to read it, and then a history professor I work with recommended it. I trusted her endorsement! 11mo
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tenar @MallenNC Me too!! And what a great endorsement. I‘m currently watching the author‘s series Crash Course Black American History on Youtube, and it‘s given me high expectations for his work! 11mo
MallenNC @tenar I will have to look for that series. 11mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! 11mo
tenar 🚨 Last minute emergency substitution! I am swapping #9 for Prelude to Foundation by Isaac Asimov, which my brother wants me to read prior to the upcoming TV adaptation. We are a sci-fi fam. 11mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Wordslut, of course I‘m reading it too. I‘ve also read the Hidden Lives of Trees and enjoyed that as well. I have not read Prelude to Foundation, let me know if it‘s good. (I‘ve only read Foundation) 11mo
tenar @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m glad, I‘m going to keep putting The Hidden Life of Trees on my list until it gets picked and read. I will let you know how Prelude goes! I‘ve also only read Foundation and am not huge on series and prequels, so I‘m a little nervous, but my brother thinks I‘ll like it. We‘ll see! 11mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @tenar I read The Hidden Life of Trees not long after Lab Girl, which I loved and highly recommend if you didn‘t read that one, I‘d recommend it too. 11mo
tenar @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I love nature nonfiction, and I think the three biggest books I haven‘t yet read have got to be The Hidden Life of Trees, Braiding Sweetgrass, and Lab Girl! You‘ve got me moving Lab Girl up the list. I wonder if #SheSaid would be interested in a nature/climate book. Have we had one on our list yet? 11mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @tenar No, we haven‘t yet. Braiding Sweetgrass was very good too. 11mo
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This is what I‘ve been looking for! Our Nobel-winning author stretched, altered, and enriched my conception of myself and our universe through a simplified exploration of ten choice insights from physics. Some of the bits on quantum particles have since leaked out my ears, but the sheer delight in how unusual matter is has remained. And though I‘m not much of a rereader, I think I‘d enjoy experiencing this short, fascinating book again. #BookSpin

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! 11mo
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The Lathe of Heaven | Ursula K Le Guin
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I‘m, again, surprised and delighted by U.K. Le Guin. This hypnotic tale, in which dreams alter reality, explores a power struggle about whether and how that ability should be used. The characters are embodiments of ideologies and the plot is a thought experiment, but this short novel ramped up the stakes so quickly and turned its twists so sharply that it was also very compulsively readable sci-fi! I especially recommend it to Philip K. Dick fans.

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Passing | Nella Larsen
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When The Vanishing Half wasn‘t one of my top reads last year, I felt left out! It made me want to try more takes on the central topic; this one was just my speed. I love a short book, and Passing, a 1929 work out of the Harlem Renaissance, packs a wallop for its slim size. A complex drama about the reunion of two childhood acquaintances whose lives have diverged across “the color line”, it also explores anxieties of marriage & class. #DoubleSpin

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yes, this is a good read! 11mo
TheAromaofBooks Great progress!! 11mo
tenar @Riveted_Reader_Melissa It‘s one of my favorite books I‘ve read this year! 11mo
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The Genius of Birds | Jennifer Ackerman
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An energetically written overview of what we know (and speculate) about the intellect of birds. Covering skills from spacial navigation to social manipulation, we meet many different species and many scientists‘ equally ingenious designs to test our feathered friends. I learned a ton, including delights like pigeons can learn to distinguish between the styles of famed impressionist painters, but the jumpy, short-winded style wasn‘t my favorite.

ChaoticMissAdventures Isn't she such a good writer? I was blown away by this one. 12mo
tenar @ChaoticMissAdventures She infused everything, from lab experiments to rainforest excursions, with the same intensity of enthusiasm and wonder! 12mo
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I‘ve gotten myself in a book mess, where I‘ve accumulated 20-odd e-books from the library, then had to disconnect my e-reader from the Wi-Fi so that it doesn‘t realize the library‘s taken them back. 😵‍💫 It started as a panicked way to hold onto a bookclub read, and it‘s gotten out of hand! I‘m going to join in on July‘s #BookSpin & #BookSpinBingo to put a dent in this collection. I‘m thrilled by these 10 fiction & 10 NF titles and happy to play!

ErinSueMreads Add this to the list of problems only a diehard book person would understand 12mo
TheAromaofBooks Yay! And I have TOTALLY been there! 😂 12mo
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My Dyslexia | Philip Schultz
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A brief (130 p.), moving memoir from Pulitzer-winning poet Philip Schultz about his life with dyslexia, undiagnosed until he was over fifty and his son was evaluated. He describes how school shattered his self-worth, how utterly and inexplicably hard ‘simple‘ things were, and shares the turning points of first being celebrated for his writing, and then, meaningfully, celebrated for sharing his dyslexia. A raw and open journey to self-acceptance.

tenar Notable to me was the blurbing about how the author was able to “rise above” and “defy” his disability, when he makes it beautifully clear that he believes he and his son are “special not despite, but because of” their dyslexia. #DisabilityReadathon 12mo
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This collection solidified UKLG as one of my top authors!

Set primarily in her famed scifi and fantasy universes, it deals with coming & going, learning & unlearning, finding your place and leaving your home behind. Space travel, politics, and magic are tools to investigate the right to know things could be different, how one discovers they could be different, and what it‘s like when your idea of the world shatters open, revealing something new.

tenar These themes are also central to my two favorite novels of hers, set each in her same scifi and fantasy universes: The Left Hand of Darkness & The Tombs of Atuan.

Super belated review of my #ChunksterChallenge2021 read!
12mo
Amiable Yay! Congratulations on finishing! Is 816 the total page count? 12mo
tenar @Amiable Yes, that‘s right! A petite chunk 😉 Thanks for hosting this year! 12mo
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About Us: Essays from the Disability Series of the New York Times | Peter Catapano, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson
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A range of disabled writers share the variety of emotions, from fear to joy, humor to frustration, sparked by their circumstances.

An essay on living with Tourette‘s had me questioning medications not to improve health, but to make a patient palatable to society. ‘Intimacy Without Touch‘ had me in tears at the beauty in being disabled.

When disabled people express themselves, society often covers its ears. This collection is a chance to listen.

tenar Hi Litsy, I‘ve missed you! I‘m back from some of my own challenges with disability and am belatedly reviewing what I read for the #DisabilityReadathon in April. I hope you all have been as well as possible lately 🌼 13mo
LeahBergen So nice to see you again! 13mo
Amiable Welcome back! 13mo
KVanRead Welcome back!! 🤗 Great review! 13mo
tenar @LeahBergen @Amiable @KVanRead Thank y‘all! So nice to see all of you (and your books)! 13mo
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About Us: Essays from the Disability Series of the New York Times | Peter Catapano, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson
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I‘m back from outer space just in time for April and the #DisabilityReadathon! The only requirement to join is to pick up an #OwnVoices book inclusive of disability during the next month.

Here‘s what I‘ve got checked out in anticipation:
About Us: Essays from the Disability Series of the NYT, Being Heumann, a memoir from Judith Heumann (who you may have seen in Netflix‘s Crip Camp), The Pretty One, and My Dyslexia, from a Pulitzer-winning poet.

tenar To find prompts, sprints, and recommendations, check out the readathon‘s Twitter here:
https://mobile.twitter.com/DisabilityRead

And to look at a few books perfect for this readathon that I‘ve shared on Litsy, click this tag: #tdr
1y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Looks great! 1y
ishan0986 @tenar Hey didn't see your posts from quite some time. How's everything? Trapped in a big book I suppose?? 13mo
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tenar @ishan0986 It has been a while, and I so appreciate you checking in! My reading groove got totally thrown off by other parts of my life, but I think I‘m starting to get back in the swing of things. I am still on page 600 of an 800 page U.K. LeGuin collection I started in January, so your diagnosis is correct! 😂 How are you enjoying your Kindle? 13mo
ishan0986 @tenar Happy to hear that you are getting your groove back. Buying the Kindle was the best decision this year. I do love books but the portability it offers really is amazing. 13mo
tenar @ishan0986 I‘m so glad you‘re loving it! It might be my favorite gadget. Thanks again for checking in on me! 13mo
ishan0986 @tenar Hey no need to thank me. This is one of the most amazing community and everyone here looks out of one another. I am just returning the favor. You people made this place special for me. This is the least I can do.😅🤗 13mo
tenar @ishan0986 You‘ve made me smile! This really is one of the nicest corners of the internet I‘ve ever come across. ☺️ Let‘s both try our best to give and receive that kindness. You‘re already doing it well! 13mo
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Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit | Jeanette Winterson
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A semi-autobiographical novel, sharp and dryly funny recounting a childhood under religious extremism. As the story progressed and Jeanette interspersed fairytale & legend to convey her mythic journey to self-acceptance, I was wanting deeper cuts, something less tidy.

But Winterson has said she “wrote a story I could live with. The other one was too painful. I could not survive it.” and a survivable lesbian story was invaluable then and is still.

kspenmoll Nice review! 1y
tenar @kspenmoll Thank you! 🧡 1y
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A star-studded and heartfelt book by and about black women writers, and one of the more consistently strong essay collections I‘ve read. My reading habits have changed for the better because of the messages here; I‘m inspired by the idea of not passively receiving what is hopefully representation, but curating a narrative to counter the one society‘s written for you. A celebration of writing and reading and black women guaranteed to grow your TBR!

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I worried this was only retreading ground covered in Soseki‘s earlier novels - a naive youngster out of college fumbling in the big city - but this ended up being surprisingly experimental in structure. Covered my pet favorite topic of being unable to take action outside of one‘s mind, but also touched on familial loss that was clearly personal to the author, and explored the thoughts of a unique set of characters. I can‘t help but love Soseki.

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Remnant Population | Elizabeth Moon
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An unexpected scifi story, better left unspoiled by the blurb! When her planet‘s colony is forced to leave, elderly Ofelia decides her best chance at peace and quiet is to stay behind. Alone. Examines capitalism and patriarchy to ask: why do we think so little of old women? She wonders: is a community that disrespects you preferable to isolation?

In turns tense, humorous, surreal, and (datedly) feminist in a mix that reminded me of Mrs. Caliban.

tenar From the cover, “Ofelia—tough, kind, wise and unwise, fond of food, tired of foolish people—is one of the most probable heroines science fiction has ever known.”—Ursula K. Le Guin 1y
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Mind of My Mind | Octavia E. Butler
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When a young black telepath being groomed by a powerful father activates her latent powers, other loner psychics are suddenly drawn together, leading to conflict and growth.

This slim book juggles eugenics, corruption, ableism, racism, and mental illness without drawing many conclusions; I couldn‘t draw one, either. Although standalone, it‘s neither first written nor first chronologically of a loose quartet; further reading may be more rewarding.

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Not every day a New York Times best-selling author messages you back! I shared with Sonya Renee Taylor that her book, The Body Is Not an Apology, was the first nonfiction (especially activism/self-help) book not exclusively about disability that made me feel genuinely included in the audience. I often feel like a niche, unrelatable, or unmentioned subject. She‘s a star.

The 2nd edition - expanded, revised, introduced by Ijeoma Oluo - is out now!

Amiable That‘s so neat! 1y
tenar @Amiable It made my day! 1y
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The Deep | Rivers Solomon, Daveed Diggs, William Hutson, Jonathan Snipes
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This month I read a historian‘s grappling with the horrifying mass drowning of disabled Africans on the slave ship Le Rodeur, only to find this novella about the weight of remembering that history.

The Deep imagines the sea-dwelling descendants of enslaved people thrown overboard, exploring their choice to elect one ‘historian‘ to carry all the memories of their kind. Is being without history, especially one so devastating, a freedom or a loss?

tenar Some early problems with the writing, particularly repetitiveness, were much improved by the end of this emotional, magical tale. I was swept away. 1y
sarahlandis This book blew me away. One of my favorites from my 2020 reads 1y
tenar @sarahlandis I‘m glad you thought so! I‘m amazed by how touched and invested I was by the end of such a short page count, especially after I wasn‘t sure about the opening chapters. It conjured something powerful and stuck the landing! 1y
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“Nobody knew anything about any time when things had been different. Nobody knew there was any place where things might be different. We were enslaved by the present time.”

I‘m halfway through this collection and completed the set from Le Guin‘s Hainish universe. She creates far-off planets and societies with a common ancestor to ours, then lets us teach them & them teach us other ways to be. I love her work in this vein. #ChunksterChallenge2021

mavey Wow interesting premise! Such a beautiful cover! 1y
tenar @Mavey Yes, I‘m delighted she has so much written under this great premise! My favorite so far is her full-length The Left Hand of Darkness, which uses the common ancestor idea to explore gender. 1y
mavey @tenar I'll definitely read it! Thanks for sharing!😄 1y
Amiable Fabulous! 👍🏼 1y
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A Raisin in the Sun | Lorraine Hansberry
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- Langston Hughes

I found A Raisin in the Sun both tender and brutal. The level to which Hansberry develops each unique character, each adult family member‘s dreams, lets her tackle an amazing breadth of social issues without seeming forced at all. Segregation, poverty, beauty, feminism, religion, more. It‘s masterful.

In my edition, the intro discussed what was cut for the stage & film. I was shocked - it all seemed vital! Vital in every sense.