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Talking to Strangers
Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Dont Know | Malcolm Gladwell
The highly anticipated new book from Malcolm Gladwell, No.1 international bestselling author of The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, What the Dog Saw and David and Goliath In July 2015, a young black woman named Sandra Bland was pulled over for a minor traffic violation in rural Texas. Minutes later she was arrested and jailed. Three days later, she committed suicide in her cell. What went wrong? Talking to Strangers is all about what happens when we encounter people we don't know, why it often goes awry, and what it says about us. How do we make sense of the unfamiliar? Why are we so bad at judging someone, reading a face, or detecting a lie? Why do we so often fail to 'get' other people? Through a series of puzzles, encounters and misunderstandings, from little-known stories to infamous legal cases, Gladwell takes us on a journey through the unexpected. You will read about the spy who spent years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon, the man who saw through the fraudster Bernie Madoff, the suicide of the poet Sylvia Plath and the false conviction of Amanda Knox. You will discover that strangers are never simple. No one shows us who we are like Malcolm Gladwell. Here he sets out to understand why we act the way we do, and how we all might know a little more about those we don't.
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Clint
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Thoroughly enjoyed this book and found it to be engaging and interesting all the way through. I have read Gladwell‘s “Outliers” a while back and enjoyed that too. He does a great job of looking deeper at regular things and finding connections. He also presents the stories and information in a way that is very accessible.

Vivlio_Gnosi Looking forward to reading this! 3d
Clint It was different, yet readable, and interesting. I‘d recommend it! 1d
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Amiable
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Alert for those with e-readers: This book is available for $4.99 today as a daily deal on both Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just downloaded my copy!

#NFNov
@rsteve388 @Clwojick

Jee_HookedOnBookz Tq for sharing! 6d
Amiable @Jee_HookedOnBookz I thought it was a typo when I saw it! The book isn't even out in paperback yet. 6d
Jee_HookedOnBookz It was such a good deal! I got it as soon as I saw your post! ❤️ Tq so much! 5d
rsteve388 1 pt 3d
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Cinfhen
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MicheleinPhilly I hate talking to strangers! #IntrovertsUnited 6d
BarbaraTheBibliophage This is an exciting new deal. Hardly ever get a price like this on such a recent book. And it‘s the perfect pair for my last read (an ARC) 6d
Cinfhen I know @BarbaraTheBibliophage it‘s brand new !!! So worth the $5 plus I had a .75 cent credit so it only cost me $4.25 😉 (edited) 6d
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Reviewsbylola I just bought one of his books! I‘ve never read him. 6d
TheRiehlDeal Gladwell was just on Joe Rogan's podcast. 6d
Megabooks My friend Nimet mentioned how good this was. Thanks for the tag! 6d
Cinfhen My son who‘s not the greatest reader will devour any book by Gladwell @Megabooks @Reviewsbylola @TheRiehlDeal 6d
Crazeedi I totally enjoy gladwell's books 4d
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sailu112
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This is an eye opener. Everyone of us should read this book and start treating each other right.

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Lindy
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“The right way to talk to strangers is with caution and humility” and “To assume the best about another is THE trait that has created modern society” are my main takeaways here. While I felt a bit lost initially, I came around to appreciating what Gladwell has done with this social science #audiobook. His narration is combined with lots of interview, court reenactment & other audio segments, plus music by Janelle Monae (Hell You Talmbout link ⬇️).

Lindy Sandra Bland and her death in police custody is the tragedy that prompted Gladwell to write this book. He includes Monae‘s song that names her: https://youtu.be/fumaCsQ9wKw 1w
Chrissyreadit Those are great takeaways! 1w
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twohectobooks I admit I have some skepticism about Gladwell‘s work mainly generated by a coworker who talks about it all the time. Have you read any of his other books? If so, which do you think is his best? I need to read one and form my own opinion! 1w
squirrelbrain Thanks for posting - I‘ll try and get this out of the library.... 1w
twohectobooks @Lindy thanks, I‘ll give it a try! 1w
Hooked_on_books I look forward to this one and definitely want to listen to the audio. My library finally got it, so I‘m on the very long waitlist. I think it‘ll be worth the wait. 1w
Lindy @Hooked_on_books Definitely worth waiting for. 😊 1w
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Lindy
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Poets die young. That is not just a cliché. The life expectancy of poets as a group trails playwrights, novelists and nonfiction writers by a considerable margin. […] And of every occupational category, poets have far and away the highest suicide rates, as much as 5 times higher than the general population.

Chrissyreadit I did not know that. 1w
Lindy @Chrissyreadit Neither did I. I plan to investigate this statistic further. 1w
Simona I bought this book last week on the recommendation of the salesman in my local bookstore. I wasn‘t sure if I want to read it, but he was very enthusiastic about it ... seeing your posts now, I really looking forward to read it 🤓 1w
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CarolynM 😢 1w
twohectobooks This book and a review of it from The Atlantic came up on one of my podcasts recently. I‘ve never read any Malcolm Gladwell but the reviewer bothered to trace where this particular statistic came from with somewhat amusing results (you can probably decipher the tone of the review and whether you want to read it from its title!): https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/09/when-malcolm-gladwell-says-not... 1w
Lindy @twohectobooks Thanks for linking to the source of the poet suicide statistic, of which I was already skeptical. Andrew Ferguson in the Atlantic review makes some good points, but he also betrays his pedantry: “Then we move on to Gladwell‘s second puzzle-that‘s-not-really-a-puzzle: ‘Why are people who know the stranger deceived when others who don‘t know them [sic] aren‘t?‘” Get with the times: it‘s ok to use “them” for singular. 1w
Lindy @Chrissyreadit @CarolynM Check the review in the Atlantic, which @twohectobooks links below, to learn more about the poet suicide statistic. 1w
Chrissyreadit @Lindy @twohectobooks I found the article interesting, but possibly also using faulty information to make a point. I do have to go through research to find specific information but artists do have higher rates of depression and higher rates of suicide. This encompasses people who lean toward emotion over logic. It also includes accidental suicide from overdoses- taking in something to numb or dull pain of emotions- partly why gladwells statement 1w
Chrissyreadit Is so easy to believe. Another criticism I question came from 10,000 hours mentioned in a previous book. Yes there are people who make it with the gifts they are born with, but in all fairness 10,000 is an arbitrary not magical number. Spending that much time in a craft or skill does bring a level of competence if not excellence. The last comment I have is if Gladwells book helps people begin engaging in open communication it has served a vital (edited) 1w
Chrissyreadit Purpose, but what it is not discussing openly based on the critique, is that the people who read it are coming from a place already persuaded. It is as the commentator said, how to engage in communication when one is hostile. That depends on the function of the hostility. Does Gladwell discuss this? If one is hostile because they are in a position of power it will be more difficult to address than if they are hostile from a position of fear. 1w
Chrissyreadit Finally, on lying I‘m not sure if gladwell addresses this or not- but humans want to be in a place of safety. For some people it is easy to believe a lie because it is less painful to live that way, or less work to dig for the truth. It could be our spymasters like the title and power but not the actual work and minutiae- that is more science than politics. All in all I find anything that over simplified problematic because we are complex, and yet 1w
Chrissyreadit Sometimes simple can also be truth. I may have just hijacked your post @Lindy but I look forward to seeing what your thoughts are. 1w
Lindy @Chrissyreadit Thanks for all of your comments. I think you would enjoy Gladwell‘s book. I don‘t know if you have triggers, but be forewarned that sexual assaults are included. 1w
Chrissyreadit @Lindy I do not have triggers in nonfiction. I avoid in pleasure reading because of the work I do. 1w
Lindy @Chrissyreadit What shocked me in this book is the amount of alcohol that students consume. Researchers have added to the upper limits in their categories when asking about consumption because 20 or more drinks a night isn‘t out of the question. Something like 1 in 10 students have experienced an alcohol-related blackout in the past 2 weeks. 1w
twohectobooks @Lindy @Chrissyreadit enjoying both of your comments on this! 1w
Chrissyreadit @Lindy I‘m sad but not shocked. That generation is facing high numbers of depression and anxiety- even though previous generations had serious struggles. 1w
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Lindy
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Drinking puts you at the mercy of your environment. It crowds out everything except the most immediate experiences.

squirrelbrain I‘d be interested to hear your thoughts on this one - I nearly borrowed it from the library this week, but resisted (for now!). 2w
Samplergal It‘s on my audible wish list. Let us know if you think it‘s good. I‘ve heard really good reviews. 2w
Lindy @squirrelbrain @Samplergal I‘m 2/3 into it and learning surprising things. 👍 2w
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Lindy
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I didn‘t meet any strangers on my travels to the bakery this morning. No one had even walked in the footprints I had left on my way there. 🥖❄️
#audiowalk

Cathythoughts Pure snow ❄️ 2w
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BookBelle84
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This was fascinating and will really make me consider how I judge and react to others. The audiobook was fantastic I loved how it was set up like a podcast with actual recordings throughout. This would be a great one for school reading as I believe everyone could gain something in their understanding and judgement of others.

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Abby2
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Very interesting. I will look at human interaction differently.

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Simona
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Retail therapy ... after some very bad weeks I just need to reduce my stress level, and here it is - mixed pile of reading possibilities. Happy reading and relaxing weekend Littens 😘

batsy Lovely pile! Hope the upcoming weeks improve for you ❤️ 1mo
Tanisha_A Awesome stack! Better days ahead. 💛 1mo
ClairesReads Best kind of retail therapy- I hope the next week is kinder 1mo
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Cathythoughts Lovely stack ! Wishing you well 👍🏻♥️ 1mo
Sace Hope you start feeling better soon. 1mo
ljuliel I hope your books can take you away to other places for awhile. A vacation for your brain ! (edited) 1mo
charl08 Ooh! Nice stack. I want to read Travellers in the 3rd Reich. 1mo
Simona @Sace @ljuliel Thank you 😊Lazy weekend without any kind of obligations definitely helped me. 1mo
Balibee146 Hope you are starting to feel better 👍 1mo
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janerzy
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Malcolm Gladwell is one of my favorite authors, and no surprise his stories and case studies in this book again make you think. The book is eye-opening and interesting. And Gladwell is a master of describing the intricacy of the subject in reorienting your purpose and direction. As what Oprah said about this book - “It will actually change not just how you see strangers, but how you look at yourself”, I sincerely agree.

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SaraGarland
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Malcolm Gladwell did a great job of connecting the dots with this one. Intriguing, eye-opening, and, as always, interesting.

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Kimberlone
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Highly recommend this for anyone who is a fan of Gladwell‘s previous books or Revisionist History podcast. This feels more personal than his previous books, though, and Gladwell explains that the premise of the book is inspired by his reaction to the Sandra Bland case. Gladwell explores many examples of when our failure to talk to strangers effectively has had tragic consequences, from Bernie Madoff to Jerry Sandusky. Get the audiobook!

Kimberlone @TheReadingMermaid not #scarathlon related, but I do get a point for finishing a book? 1mo
TheReadingMermaid Yes ma'am, 1pt for the book and 1pt for the post 🧟‍♀️ 1mo
Crazeedi I've enjoyed his books 1mo
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LauraJ
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Mehso-so

I listened to the audiobook, which was basically a very well produced podcast. Gladwell‘s premise is that we‘re not good at being able to tell when someone is lying and maybe that‘s not such a bad thing. He makes his point, but there‘s not enough material for a book and this covers the same old studies that have been used in dozens of other books. Worth a listen, but I have my doubts about the print version.

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KimHM
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Just finished the audio of this title and I‘ll definitely be listening again. Gladwell is experimenting with the form—he includes audio clips of interviews and sources—hybridizing book and podcast and it works. More importantly, his examples will encourage you to re-examine your own interactions with strangers, particularly if the parties are not equal in power. Read or listen patiently. Wait until you get to the end. 💡📚💡📚💡📚💡📚💡

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SaraGarland
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I‘ve enjoyed all of his books. Time to give this one a try!

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DavidDiamond
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I didn't enjoy this one as much as his previous books only because this was my first audiobook.
And while the audiobook is the way to go (you hear historical recordings, interviews with the actual people, re-enactments), I found myself too easily distracted (I'm driving!) and would lose the thread of the narrative...so that's on me!
While the title is slightly deceptive this book is more about how we misread strangers and what happens as a result.

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CorLie
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Interesting.
Thought provoking.
But...

I'm not sure I read this as deeply as it requires. While reading, I had a few nitpicks with his presentation (there were placed where it felt like data was missing to make the comparison he needed to arrive at the result) and several with his conclusions. I definitely didn't end up where he did

But in general it was a very well structured, well written, thoughtful read.

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Sward7
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Every parent needs to read chapter on the drinking culture at colleges. I highly recommend this as a whole.

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UnabridgedPod
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I have long appreciated Malcolm Gladwell's development of an argument. My first Malcolm Gladwell book was Outliers, which takes on the principles that make those who exist outside the mainstream successful. (I used to teach that one with students and always appreciated their reactions to Gladwell's ideas.) From that book on, I devoured everything--backlist, new books, and more recently his podcast, Revisionist History. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod No matter the format, Gladwell's work always offers a distinctive take on some element of society, moving through a series of seemingly disconnected pieces until he ties them together in a convincingly connected whole.⠀

In his new book, Talking to Strangers, Gladwell begins with an examination of the tragic death of Sandra Bland. ⬇️
2mo
UnabridgedPod His discussion of Bland's interaction with a police officer leads to a larger consideration of how we deal with strangers. Gladwell moves through Bernie Madoff and Sylvia Plath, Amanda Knox and campus rapes. Each new layer enriches the reader's growing understanding of how a conversation between two strangers can go so, so wrong. ⬇️ 2mo
UnabridgedPod As in all of his work, Gladwell offers a convincing insight into the world: he made me consider my own interactions, whether I default to truth, and how transparent my reactions are. I so appreciate the perspective he develops and the attention he focuses on the aftermath of ill-fated conversations. 2mo
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rachelk
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I saw this on Twitter this morning and thought it was funny enough to share.

SW-T 😂😂😂 2mo
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TheSkiersKnowledgeBase
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Suicide is coupled with the place, thing, emotion, etc. take that away and often the attempt would not be reattempted

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Lauren.Archer
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I am going to start by saying that this should be mandatory reading for everyone, especially students, teachers, coaches and public servants. Second, if you are going to read this, please use the Audiobook medium. It is extremely well produced and is well worth the listen.

For my full review, please visit my blog at: http://obsessedbookaholic.com/2019/09/27/talking-to-strangers-book-review/

Blaire Great! Always on the lookout for audiobooks 2mo
andrew61 I love revisionist history so I'll definitely look out for this one, i have just finished the third series and wonder and episode is fascinating. 2mo
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Floresj
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Mehso-so

I feel like this book is a misnomer.... it was more about how difficult it is to spot lying. I love his interesting vignettes, but some were really tangential. He makes me think, I disagreed on a number of connections, but was entertained. I liked: spies, blackout science, Friends, Knox sections. Didn‘t like: Sandusky, Turner, KSM, and policing sections. This one was a bit off for me but still enjoy his podcast!

keithmalek No way. I'm done with Gladwell. He writes in a captivating way, but is wrong about everything. No more Gladwell for me. 2mo
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DavidDiamond
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I‘m not an audiobook person, but when I heard that Gladwell speaks to the actual people and plays the actual events (much like his Revisionist History podcast) coupled with it becoming available via Libby...I just couldn‘t resist!

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caitlin.reads.books
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Malcolm Gladwell is one of my all time favorite authors. I love nonfiction books and his are so interesting and easy to read. I have waited YEARS for him to publish another book and this one did not disappoint. I didn‘t want to put it down and read it in two days while on vacation. I highly recommend this one! 5/5 ⭐️ #nonfiction #malcolmgladwell #malcolmgladwellbooks

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JMEdwards
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Widely diverse stories were used to illustrate theories on why and how we can misread some people so badly. Because the author was constantly interweaving different scenarios, the book felt a bit disjointed at times. Every story he used, was a familiar one where we have asked ourselves, "how could this happen?" The conclusion was a bit weak and could have benefitted from a more lengthy summary, but overall, highly recommended.

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C.Perone
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It didn't flow as well as his past books. Nevertheless, brilliant, interesting, insightful

Crazeedi I love Gladwell's books! 2mo
C.Perone So do I!!! The way he ties together seemingly unrelated things is sheer brilliance 🤩 2mo
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C.Perone
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Looking forward to this!

ManyWordsLater Sounds fascinating! 2mo
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caitlin.reads.books
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1. Talking to Strangers: What we Should Know About the People We Don‘t Know by Malcolm Gladwell / Hungry Heart / One Dark Throne / The Power of Habit

2. Talking to Strangers. Technically I pre-ordered it, but wasn‘t charged until it shipped this week. So excited to dive in! I‘ve been waiting on a new book from him for years!

3. Partly cloudy, 80 degrees, few sprinkles, windy.

#weekendreads @rachelsbrittain

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EmMcKee
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"Levine argues that over the course of evolution, human beings never developed sophisticated and accurate skills to detect deception as it was happening because there is no advantage to spending your time scrutinizing the words and behaviors of those around you. The advantage to human beings lies in assuming that strangers are truthful."

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JMEdwards
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"We have a default to truth: our operating assumption is that the people we are dealing with are honest... We start by believing. And we stop believing only when our doubts and misgivings rise to the point where we can no longer explain them away."

Suet624 Yup. It gets me every time. 2mo
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palmerspageturners
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I‘ve been a big fan of @malcolmgladwell since his 2007 book, Blink. His latest release, Talking to Strangers, was excellent. Well researched, informative, eye opening, and emotional at times. I listened to it on audio on @librofm and I HIGHLY recommend the audio version! It listens like a podcast, and you hear the voices of the people he interviewed in the book instead of the author just reading their quotes. #talkingtostrangers @littlebrown

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jillrhudy
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I love all of Gladwell's analysis: I'm a fangirl. A friend says you can't mistake his correlations for causations, no matter how convincing he is. His connections between events are brilliant and he'll make you re-examine and think more deeply, but he falls back on pat advice: check your biases; listen with care to folks; know that your ability to spot liars is lousy. Even so, I keep feeling fascination. #selfhelp #thinking #history

Aimeesue Spot on! I love listening to him, but I disagree with him a lot. Some of the connections he makes, while interesting, are pretty tangential. 2mo
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jillrhudy
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Default to truth becomes an issue when we are forced to choose between two alternatives, one of which is likely and the other of which is impossible to imagine. . . . Default to truth biases us in favor of the most likely interpretation.

Aimeesue I may have issues with Gladwell's premise for this book. It's not a "default to truth." That's a "default to believing what we want to believe about people, depending on what we believe about them in the first place." Truth Default theory says that we generally believe people are telling the truth, but it leaves out WHICH people. Power dynamics play a huge role. Head intelligence agent vs suspicious subordinate involves a lot of? 2mo
Aimeesue … power issues, as does Male Doctor vs teenage girls. Scientific method says "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence" and that's carried over to interpersonal interactions. Has for millennia. That's why "Believe women" has a real resonance these days - because in the past, we routinely deferred to power. What we see as "true" depends on who says it. (edited) 2mo
jillrhudy @Aimeesue Great points! I think he does sort of incorporate deferral to power, in that he points out that it requires even more evidence to believe that someone in power could do terrible things and has done so for years. 2mo
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cathysaid
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I just read the excerpt. This sounds really good! Comes out on September 10.

https://apple.news/AojfXkI-_QsqtnaGJ9JE4kA

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Mirandareads
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I sincerely hope that everyone reads this book as soon they can! It releases September 10th!! Malcolm Gladwell has done a PHENOMENAL job! This was my first of his to read and I‘m just completely blown away.

jillrhudy It came out today and I'm a couple of chapters in and really liking it. 2mo
Mirandareads @jillrhudy Yes it did!🙌🏼 I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. I found it to be pretty profound. 2mo
jillrhudy @Mirandareads It's already making me feel better about some costly misjudgments I made about people in the past. 2mo
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akaGingerK
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Road trip! Drove to the beach today and nearly finished both audiobooks I‘ve been bouncing between. Due to actually interacting with my cousins, though, I basically beach-damaged my physical book without reading any. Whoops!
#advancedlisteningcopies

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underground_bks
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Pickpick

This was my first Malcolm Gladwell, and now I have to go read everything else! In Talking to Strangers, Gladwell investigates what goes wrong when we interact with people we don‘t know, using dramatic scenarios ripped from the headlines, history, psychology, and criminology. Gladwell begins and ends with the tragic death of Sandra Bland, and it‘s impossible to ignore how urgently we need better strategies of understanding strangers.

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HillsAndHamletsBookshop
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Pickpick

Thanks to Libro.fm for the complimentary listening copy of this audiobook. It was exceptional. Gladwell creates a truly engaging audiobook experience and does an amazing job of making us question so many of our basic assumptions about how we interact in the world with strangers. It‘s a brilliant piece of deeply thought provoking pop sociology that I simply couldn‘t put down.

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Vivlio_Gnosi
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Looking forward to reading this #Nonfiction piece by one of my favorite author and podcasters, Malcolm Gladwell. Added to my #TBR stack. #GreenvilleSC

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