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Hill Women
Hill Women: Finding Family and a Way Forward in the Appalachian Mountains | Cassie Chambers
After rising from poverty to earn a Harvard degree, an Appalachian lawyer pays tribute to the strong "hill women" who raised and inspired her, and whose values have the potential to rejuvenate a struggling region--an uplifting and eye-opening memoir for readers of Hillbilly Elegy and Educated. Nestled in the Appalachian mountains, Owsley County is the poorest county in Kentucky and the second poorest in the country. Buildings are crumbling and fields sit vacant, as tobacco farming and coal mining decline. But strong women are finding creative ways to subsist in their hollers in the hills. Cassie Chambers grew up amidst these hollers, and through her Granny, her aunt Ruth, and her mother, Wilma, she crafts a story of struggle and progress that traces her own path out of and back into the Kentucky mountains. Cassie's Granny was a child bride who rose before dawn every morning to raise seven children, and who, despite her poverty, wouldn't hesitate to give the last bite of pie or vegetables from her garden to a struggling neighbor. Her two daughters would take very different paths: strong-willed Ruth--the hardest-working tobacco farmer in the county--stayed on the family farm, while spirited Wilma became the only one of Granny's kids to graduate high school, then moved an hour away to attend college. Married at nineteen and pregnant with Cassie a few months later, Wilma beat the odds to finish college. She raised her daughter to think she could move mountains, like the ones that kept her safe but also isolated from the larger world. Cassie would spend much of her childhood with Granny and Ruth in the hills of Owsley County, both while Wilma was a college student and after. With her "hill women" values guiding her, Cassie went on to graduate from Harvard Law. But while the Ivy League gave her knowledge and opportunities, its privileged world felt far from Cassie's reality, and she headed back home to help her fellow rural Kentucky women by providing free legal services. Appalachian women face issues that are all too common: domestic violence, the opioid crisis, a world that seems more divided by the day. With nuance and heart, Cassie uses their stories paired with her own journey to break down the myth of the "hillbilly" and illuminate a region whose poor communities, especially women, can lead it into the future.
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review
ljuliel
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Mehso-so

This may have been this author‘s response to Hillbilly Elegy ,which I liked. I believe each person perceives their circumstances in different ways.This girl grew up in the poorest county in America .She had some strong female role models who all chose different paths in life, but each taught her to be strong also. She has achieved a lot in life,but parts of the book made her sound a bit too full of herself.Her granny & aunt were my favorites. 3⭐️

jillrhudy Agreed. It fell short of my expectations. 1w
ljuliel @jillrhurdy. Right. I listened to the audio and the author had an attitude I didn‘t care for. In parts of the book she sounded proud to be from that area, but it seemed to me as if she used that fact to make herself look like more of a hero for going off to make a better life for herself. Just a part of it didn‘t sit right with me. 1w
Texreader I liked Hillbilly Elegy too, but I think I‘ll skip this one. The attitude sounds like one that would frustrate me to no end (edited) 1w
ljuliel - already owned audio. Total still 68 💵 2d
65 likes4 comments
review
BlueStockingReviews
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Pickpick

HILL WOMEN was a delightful read that was both enlightening and entertaining. The writing was both passionate and immersing. It‘s a well-delivered portrait of the culture of the poorest county in the country https://www.bluestockingreviews.com/post/hill-women

Crazeedi Sou d very interesting, I have an interest in well written books about Appalachia 2w
52 likes2 stack adds1 comment
review
Cinfhen
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Mehso-so

#ARC #NetGalley a memoir in three parts. Part 1 Cassie Chambers childhood as a young girl raised in the hills of Eastern Kentucky by a spirited mother and two strong proud women of Appalachia, her aunt and granny. Part 2, Cassie as an Ivy League bound student and law student & her difficulties fitting in with the New England preppy student body. Part 3, Cassie returns to rural Kentucky to work for a nonprofit legal aid society. Gripping but dry.

92 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
jillrhudy
Pickpick

It was so-so until the author got to the part about her Legal Aid advocacy for poor women in Kentucky, and the book filled with fire and passion. I liked the parts about the tough women in her family, and she touches on social issues in Appalachia, but I feel the book tried to cover too much. It was sweet, and I am full of admiration for the author for coming home and pitching in instead of dissing the place from afar. #arc

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Well-ReadNeck
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Pickpick

Not quite what I was expecting based on the blog. But this was a good memoir about growing up in Appalachia with an emphasis on her strong female relatives. I recommend this as a strong alternative to Hillbilly Elegy (this one focuses on Eastern KY, too).

#Edelweiss

89 likes4 stack adds