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Somebody's Daughter
Somebody's Daughter: A Memoir | Ashley C. Ford
LibraryThing
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MsLeah8417
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⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

7 likes1 stack add
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Erin.Elizabeth10
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Pickpick

Another memoir for my year of memoirs! I‘m this book, the author reflected on her experiences growing up, particularly focusing on her relationship with her mother and her father. It was really good writing on family relationships and dynamics. There is heavy content, but it was told with insight and strength.

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Jnnlb
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Pickpick

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

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CocoReads
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Mehso-so

Finally finished. It‘s only a couple hundred pages and I wanted to like it but I just…didn‘t. I can‘t even really put my finger on why, she writes well and the journey to find herself should have been compelling but overall I found it no more exciting than reading about my own life. I felt she dropped the ball with regards to her father, that those parts were kind of glossed over. It was ok, just not ultimately for me. #JubilantJuly

Andrew65 Well done 👏👏👏 2mo
42 likes1 comment
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CocoReads
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My goals are simple for #JubilantJuly: finish Somebody‘s Daughter by Monday for my twice postponed book group, finish Blank Page to First Draft, make a dent in Caste for Augusts book group, and start the Say Everything series. Plus I have lots of other books if these are@t getting it for me.

Andrew65 Great to have you with us, good luck 😊👍 2mo
41 likes1 comment
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Sully1
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Mehso-so

Good and quick memoir! She moves through her life in warp speed, but tells the highlights well!

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jspoelker
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Pickpick

Ashley Ford shares her incredible story of growing up in Indiana with inside views of her family, love, and self acceptance within the social construct of being black and just being. Her parental circumstances were challenging as her father was incarcerated for most of her life while her mother struggled making ends meet and coming to terms with her own issues. Grandmother was a constant and an inner compass. Well written and well worth reading.

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CocoReads
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Finished Stone Cold Cowboy. Still working on Vortex but now that I can see we‘ll out of one eye, it‘s time to start the book group book for July. (Got the right eye fixed on Thursday, getting my left one fixed this coming up Wednesday). #20in4readatjon @Andrew65

Andrew65 Great 👏👏👏 3mo
dylanisreading Good luck! 3mo
30 likes2 comments
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LikelyLibrarian
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Mehso-so

I should preface this review by saying that I think memoirs are brave. I rarely review them as I don‘t think it‘s my place to comment on someone‘s life. That being said, there are a few issues that should be addressed. First of all, Ford‘s relationship with her father, a man who spent her entire childhood in prison for rape. In fact, his story seems tangential to her own. 👇

LikelyLibrarian If her father had abandoned the family, instead, the story would‘ve remained basically the same. The story is primarily about Ford‘s relationship with her mother, and sometimes her grandmother. By and large, I enjoyed the writing, (although she‘s a little heavy-handedly with her use of metaphors), but I was troubled by her representation of her mother. 👇 4mo
LikelyLibrarian It‘s true her mother was oftentimes abusive; it‘s also clear that her mother loved her deeply. What bothers me is Ford‘s lack of forgiveness and understanding for her mother‘s position. I‘m not saying an abused person has a responsibility to forgive the abuser. But, more than once, she claims that it‘s not her place to judge or forgive her father who, because of the mistakes he made, wasn‘t there for her. 👇 4mo
LikelyLibrarian Her father raped two women, but despite being a victim of rape herself, she seems to idolize him. The same unconditional love is not shown to the woman who raised her. I guess what bothers me here is the obvious double standard. As a mother myself, I notice this often. Fathers get a free pass while mothers, who do most of the work, get all the blame. 4mo
marleed You bring up very good points to consider. My mother died before I formed memories of her so my dad and six kids. As an adult, I had a standing joke with him and would say, ‘You know there is no statute of limitations on parental crimes decided by a child.‘ We‘d laugh. But I never considered how unfairly a child‘s justice might be delivered on two parents. 4mo
LikelyLibrarian @marleed I‘m so sorry to hear about your mother. I never really knew mine, so I found Ford‘s hero worship of her absent father odd. I also raised my step kids after their mother chose drugs. My stepdaughter often blames me and others for every unhappiness in her life, but never her own absent mother. I guess it makes me sensitive to that kind of thing. 4mo
11 likes1 stack add5 comments
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Ericalambbrown
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Pickpick

I first became acquainted with Ms Ford when she co-hosted the Lovecraft Country Radio podcast that accompanied the stellar HBO show Lovecraft Country. (Still pissed there‘s no season two, but I digress . . . ) I simply had to listen to her memoir when I realized she had one. So glad I did! Those that complain about her ‘whining‘ aren‘t actually hearing what she has to say. She‘s not whining- she just recounting her story. And it was hard. 🙌🏻

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merelybookish
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Mehso-so

In interviews, Ford is candid, funny & smart so I had high expectations for this. Maybe too high because I found it kind of tedious in places, dull even.
Ford describes her childhood, complicated family, traumatic experiences & journey to love her whole self. At its heart this a story about the lack of safety Black girls face in their homes and wider society. That is an important story to tell. Some sharp editing would have made it better.

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staci.reads
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Pickpick

I flew through the book, fascinated by her experiences, but I didn't love it. At times it felt like an overview of her life. She introduces people central to her life, but we don't get much depth about them other than what they did to/for her. There's not enough development to see them as distinct humans, just names in the timeline of her life. It felt like multiple personal narrative essays thrown together. A soft pick #Bookspin @TheAromaofBooks

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 6mo
EH2018 I completely agree...not enough depth 6mo
69 likes2 comments
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The.Great.Catsby
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Pickpick

My whole actual heart. I loved this memoir so much ❤❤❤❤❤

3.30.22

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JenReadsAlot
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Pickpick

Good memoir. My #bookspin for March @TheAromaofBooks

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 7mo
34 likes1 comment
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JenReadsAlot
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Thank you all for the birthday wishes! Vacation day with Frankie, this book and maybe some wine...

Leftcoastzen Enjoy yourself!😻adorable kitty! 7mo
Trashcanman H appy birthday Jen 7mo
JenReadsAlot @Trashcanman thank you!! 7mo
truthinfiction Happy Birthday, Jen! 🎂 Hope you have a good one!! 7mo
38 likes4 comments
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JenReadsAlot
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Excited for both of these! @TheAromaofBooks

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 7mo
GinaKButler Ohhh...loved Rules of Civility! 7mo
24 likes2 comments
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Kazzie
Pickpick

This was a well written memoir, and honest. She didn‘t sugar coat any details, or tie up the truth in a more palpable narrative

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Floresj
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Pickpick

I think any book that you don‘t want to end deserves 5 stars. Ford is able to write about her family in such a healthy manner- even when do much was dysfunctional. Her ability to see people for all that they are and understand who she is amidst that world makes for some good food for thought. I‘ll read anything Ford writes from here on out.

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Milena
Pickpick

The author of this memoir is strong, courageous, and inspiring. Somebody‘s Daughter made me think long and hard about family bonds and forgiveness. The author grows up in a family with an incarcerated dad, an unstable mom, and a grandmother who is a strong matriarch. She overcomes hardship and trauma (trigger warning without a spoiler) as she comes of age, finds herself, and makes amends with the demons from her past.

7 likes1 stack add
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NovelNancyM
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Pickpick

Ashley's story is truly one of resilience - from growing up with her dad in prison, to her mom with unpredictable mood swings, to rape, to poverty and genuine uncertainty most of her growing up years. I look forward to future books as the author continues to develop in her craft of writing.

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ChaoticMissAdventures
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Pickpick

Gorgeous. Brutal. Heartfelt.
I love Ashley C. Ford's writing. Her prose are beautiful even as to topics are painful and ugly. She brings to light so well the complexity of family relationships, and as someone who also am the first family member to leave the small town everyone else lives in it is nice to see that aspect explorered.
There are many topics and relationships addressed here and all of this feels quintessentially American.

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booklover3258
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Pickpick

My review of this book can be found on my YouTube Vlog at:

https://youtu.be/6cds52Vl2ao

Enjoy!

49 likes1 stack add
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jdiehr
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Pickpick

The author's father is in prison serving time for a crime that Ford herself would become a victim of.

In addition to the struggles and turmoil, there is fierce love and a strong, funny grandmother holding the family together.

A powerful memoir.

#bookofthemonth

35 likes2 stack adds
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ShelbyA7
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Pickpick

Book #67: 🎧 Audiobook. Relationships, especially with your family, are never black and white. That Ashley is able to maintain these relationships with her parents after all she went through is a testament to her strength and empathy. One takeaway I had was that college truly does have the ability to change a person‘s life path and pull them out of bad home situations - if only it was more affordable and didn‘t leave the lasting burden of debt.

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jdiehr
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BittersweetBooks
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The library felt too good to be true. All those books, on all those shelves, and I could just pluck them out, one by one, find an empty chair, and read, and read, and read 📖📚

21 likes1 stack add
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jdiehr
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Oops!

Pretty sure the tissue was stuck up her nose...

DivineDiana Good catch! 9mo
BookBabe Oh no! I can‘t stand typos in books 😬 9mo
Megabooks 😂😂 9mo
25 likes3 comments
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FelinesAndFelonies
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Mehso-so

I know I'm in the minority here but I just didn't enjoy this memoir. I felt like there were things happening but it just wasn't a story. The elements of trauma, abuse, & neglect are heartbreaking but the author came across as very detached from her own experiences making it difficult for me to completely immerse myself in the story. ⭐⭐⭐

NovelNancyM I was disappointed in the quality of the writing. I have heard the author interviewed and she is so articulate. Her story itself is incredible, but I, too, was disappointed in the memoir.
8mo
61 likes1 comment
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suvata
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Pickpick

Ashley really has quite a story to tell and she tells it in a compelling manner.

From the Publisher:
Somebody‘s Daughter steps into the world of growing up a poor Black girl in Indiana with a family fragmented by incarceration, exploring how isolating and complex such a childhood can be. As Ashley battles her body and her environment, she embarks on a powerful journey to find the threads between who she is and what she was born into.

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JenReadsAlot
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#botm #bookmail and socks!!

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AlizaApp
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Pickpick

A memoir about growing up in a big family but with an abusive mother and a father in prison. Loved Ashley‘s writing, and really respect her ability to reflect clearly on an upbringing that had troubles, yes, but also moments of joy.

31 likes2 stack adds
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Karmapen
Pickpick

A very engaging memoir.

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bell7
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Pickpick

This memoir has been getting a lot of press lately, where much of the focus is on the fact that Ashley's father was incarcerated. But... it's really so much more. It's about her relationships with family members that she loves but who are imperfect. It's also about memories - those we want to forget and those we want to imprint indelibly. And it's all wrapped up in lyrical writing that was an absolute pleasure to read.

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LisaLovesToRead
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Pickpick

Ford is vulnerable and beautiful in this book. I hope she keeps writing!

10 likes1 stack add
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carylwaite
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Pickpick

I read this as part of the Roxane Gay book club and enjoyed reading this. It did put into perspective my own childhood as well as my own parenting. I appreciated Ms. Ford‘s voice and the love as well as chaos that family gave her.

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AuthorAnnaBella
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"Although the wind blows terribly here, the moonlight also leaks between the roof planks of this ruined house."
Izumi Shikibu

Ashley penned a transparent story that encapsulated love, belonging, forgiveness, resentment, poverty, incarceration, mental health, generational trauma & abuse.

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Jen2
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Pickpick

Very good!

48 likes1 stack add
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Hooked_on_books
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Bailedbailed

By and large, I don‘t particularly enjoy reading childhood memoirs. Especially those with abuse. Does that stop me from trying to read them? No, it does not. This one is definitely not for me.

bio_chem06 Was it the content or was it bad writing? I just got this from the library and was hoping it was good. 13mo
megnews I started it and put it on pause. She seems very unattached from herself in telling this very emotional story. But that could be the effect of the abuse. 13mo
Hooked_on_books @bio_chem06 I didn‘t love the writing, but it‘s really the content. Whenever people rave about a childhood memoir and seem to universally love it (like The Glass Castle), I try to read it and there‘s just nothing I enjoy about it. People seem to be really loving this one, so definitely don‘t let me dissuade you. 13mo
Hooked_on_books @megnews I actually don‘t mind a detached writing style and prefer it to an overly dramatic/emotional one. But there‘s just something about child abuse memoirs that turns me off. It‘s me, for sure. 13mo
44 likes4 comments
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sarahljensen
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Pickpick

This book is just incredible. I'll certainly be reading it again, but it is an exceptionally emotional read. So... Be ready for that.

#litsycats #catsoflitsy

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PMMREADS
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Pickpick

I highly recommend this book 📖 Ashley C.Ford brought her full self to this work and told her story masterfully. I recommended also listening to the audiobook as there is a great interview at the end with the author and Clint Smith,where Ashley shares her writing process and shares how she processed her feeling and emotions during the writing of this book.

Chelsea.Poole I loved the end of the audiobook as well! 1y
PMMREADS @Chelsea.Poole yes 📖 the interview at the end was great. 😊 1y
13 likes2 comments
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Well-ReadNeck
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Mehso-so

#audiobook

Very vulnerable Memoir with trigger warnings. Based on the blurb, I expected more about her relationship with her father. Good overall, but a slow start.

janeycanuck I agree that the blurb makes it seem like it‘ll be more about her father but when you reframe the title as the “somebody” being either her father, mother OR grandmother at any given time, it makes much more sense. I think the blurb is off. 1y
Hooked_on_books I‘m trying this one but not digging the writing. I also tend not to enjoy childhood memoirs, so I don‘t know if I‘ll continue or not. 13mo
49 likes2 comments
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kathytrithardt
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Pickpick

This is a powerful, vulnerable memoir.
Content warnings for child abuse, sexual assault, familial death, and mental health struggles.

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Matilda
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Pickpick

Fantastic!

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kathytrithardt
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Question of the Day: What are you currently reading? #QotD

For me, it's an e-ARC of Once Stolen by D.N. Bryn and a library e-audiobook of Somebody's Daughter by Ashley C. Ford.⁣

#CurrentlyReading

[ID: daily question in a white text block over blue and purple doodles.]

kaysworld1 Just started this today 1y
Alfoster I‘m reading The Husbands. 1y
CindyMyLifeIsLit The Egoist by George Meredith and The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead 1y
See All 13 Comments
Ravenpuff Famous in a Small Town by Emma Mills. 1y
persephone1408 Currently I'm almost done with rule of wolves by leigh bardugo AND halfway thru the magicians by lev grossman 1y
kathytrithardt Oh it felt like The Magicians went on forever, @persephone1408 - but I very much enjoyed the show. 1y
persephone1408 I LOVE the show! So I'm not surprised by anything in the book so far. @kathytrithardt 1y
Gissy Ghost Whisperer (based on an old tv series. I don‘t know if the book is based on the series or viceversa. I a sucker for ghost stories☺️) and Todo Esto te Daré by Dolores Redondo. I think it was translated to English but I don‘t know the translated title. 1y
kathytrithardt I used to watch that one @Gissy 🥳 1y
DarkMina A Deadly Education 1y
Gissy @kathytrithardt I just finished it and I really enjoyed it. Trying to find the other books which are not easy. I think they are out of print. But I will try. 1y
20 likes13 comments
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janeycanuck
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Pickpick

Some #audiowalking with this amazing book.

This was beautiful & powerful to listen to. Ford is eloquent with the everyday and her memoir is compelling & moving. I loved her as a narrator, as well.

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Augustdana
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It rained all day and I read all afternoon. 🖤🖤 Then the sun finally came out and I had to document it. This book is quite something.

19 likes1 stack add
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mdemanatee
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Pickpick

I took longer with this one than I meant to. I needed time to sit with the language. My experience of this book required breathing room. Ford writes memory beautifully. The narrative remains nuanced and compassionate while talking about trauma. There is a strength in exploring these moments in a public way and there is a strength in exploring such moments in this particular way. https://youtu.be/3AoTve6Rp-k

Lissa00 I just impulsively bought this one yesterday! Glad it‘s good. 1y
mdemanatee @Lissa00 I will admit a slight bias in that Ashley attended the same mid-sized university a couple years ahead of me so I have the normal degrees of separation that would come from that. But that also almost makes it more humbling. 1y
10 likes2 comments
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sarahlandis
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Pickpick

Oh wow, this book moved me so much. To be entirely honest, it took me about a third of the book to become invested, but after that I was blown away. Ford tells her story of growing up with a father in prison, uncertainty and violence in her home, and so many terrible coming age stories that too many young woman find relatable. She tells of leaving her family to find herself and growing as an artist and woman, not without, but far from her loved ⤵️

sarahlandis ones. From race, to education and class, to complicated family relationships, Ford really bares so much in this memoir. I immediately want to read it again, I feel it heavy in my heart (edited) 1y
marleed I loved this, too! It such a reminder to embrace the children in your life and never let them feel they are a burden to you or the world they live in. 1y
sarahlandis @marleed absolutely. Also fords love honestly made me feel more compassion for my family and remind me to try and let go some of my resentment 1y
18 likes2 stack adds3 comments
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BookishTrish
Pickpick

Ford is a very good writer.