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#CliFi
review
quietlycuriouskate
Clade | James Bradley
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Mehso-so

More cli-fi. Not bad by any means, but it does have problems.
The episodic structure through time made it difficult to connect to any of the characters.
There's a thoughtlessly ableist response to autism.
I don't know what JB's issues are around motherhood, but he's spilled them on the page.
These things I can work around: the ending I cannot (see comment under spoiler alert).

quietlycuriouskate The world is totally f*cked up but, hey, we could see it as a new beginning and look how great we humans are with our resilience and our caring for our nearest and dearest; let's give ourselves a pat on the back and hit the snooze button again. Just no! 😠 1w
RamsFan1963 I thought I'd read this book and enjoyed it, but then I read the synopsis, and it didn't sound like the book I read. Turns out there's another book called Clade by Mark Budz. That's the one I read and thought was pretty entertaining. It's also cli-fic. 1w
30 likes2 comments
review
rachaich
Clade | James Bradley
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Pickpick

Brilliant. Terrifying to consider but so cleverly written.

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rachaich
Clade | James Bradley
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Amusingly I misread the title as Glade...
This is flippin good so far, the idea of climate change occurring as the story unfolds so we are in it with the characters.

review
swynn
The stone weta | Octavia Cade
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Pickpick

(2020) In the near future, governments respond to climate change by outlawing data that document its effects. An underground network of women scientists respond by caching illegal copies of authentic climate data against the day that it can be studied. I loved this, from its scary-plausible premise, to its unusual narrative structure to its feminist, queer, and colonial themes, to its effective character drama. Highly recommended.

45 likes2 stack adds
review
Decalino
New York 2140 | Kim Stanley Robinson
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Pickpick

This 600+ page novel takes place in a future where sea level rise has submerged lower Manhattan, squatters dwell among the moldering ruins, and the wealthy own vacant apartments in impossibly high skyscrapers. A lot happens, but the pleasure of this book lies in the detailed world building, the vivid cast of characters, and the possibility of real, meaningful change. Somehow my least depressing climate change read so far!

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bnp
The Coral Bones | E. J. Swift
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We found the body in an orange inflatable off the south coast of Lizard Island.

#FirstLineFridays @ ShyBookOwl

Graphic in lower right from https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/coral_bleach.html

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EliseE
Blue Skies: A Novel | T. C. Boyle
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Am halfway through and can‘t begin to fathom where it‘s headed. I am a big fan of satire but this is so dry I honestly can‘t tell that it is satire sometimes. Never have heard of T.C. Boyle but am enjoying his writing so far. I think I‘m quite over the idea of cricket fritters, though.

review
Sophronisba
Blue Skies: A Novel | T. C. Boyle
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Mehso-so

Extremely bleak domestic drama that explores climate change in near-future Florida. This is not one of the Boyle's great works but it is very much of its time. It's easy to imagine a 22nd-century American Studies prof assigning this in a Trump/Biden era cultural history class.

review
swynn
New York 2140 | Kim Stanley Robinson
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Mehso-so

(2017) It's a chunkster of ensemble fiction, following residents of the Met Life building in a future where lower Manhattan has flooded, becoming a sort of Eastern US version of Venice. Mixed feelings: I loved the setting, the ideas, and the way the disparate plot threads tied together. But the prose is frequently polemic, the characters relationships are not always well motivated, and the ending is excessively optimistic.

RamsFan1963 I love the premise of this book, but I know from past experiences with the author, I will end up bailing because it won't hold my interest. 13mo
swynn @RamsFan1963 I know what you mean -- I've tried Red Mars a couple of times, and Antarctica, but this is the first I've finished by Robinson. I liked this well enough that I'd try something else, but my reading history with him is also spotty. 13mo
38 likes2 comments