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Pushout
Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools | Monique Morris
24 posts | 18 read | 138 to read
Fifteen-year-old Diamond stopped going to school the day she was expelled for lashing out at peers who constantly harassed and teased her for something everyone on the staff had missed: she was being trafficked for sex. After months on the run, she was arrested and sent to a detention center for violating a court order to attend school. Black girls represent 16 percent of female students but almost half of all girls with a school-related arrest. The first trade book to tell these untold stories, Pushout exposes a world of confined potential and supports the growing movement to address the policies, practices, and cultural illiteracy that push countless students out of school and into unhealthy, unstable, and often unsafe futures. For four years Monique W. Morris, author of Black Stats, chronicled the experiences of black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judgedby teachers, administrators, and the justice systemand degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. Morris shows how, despite obstacles, stigmas, stereotypes, and despair, black girls still find ways to breathe remarkable dignity into their lives in classrooms, juvenile facilities, and beyond.
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ness
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Pickpick

This book is a must-read for any educator—and anyone who cares about anti-racist work. (cw for a lot of gendered/binary language).

hermyknee ♥️♥️♥️ 10mo
18 likes1 comment
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MsLeah8417
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Pickpick

🌟🌟🌟

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MsLeah8417

Chicago Public Schools eliminated recess... In 1998, the district implemented a policy that granted school administrators the discretion to choose whether or not to allow recess. This resulted in two-thirds of Chicago schools opting for a “closed campus,” which means that for nearly twenty-five years, there have been children attending Chicago public schools who have never experienced school recess.

Ms.Story 😢 11mo
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ness
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Started this on my way into work. Given some of the things my students are saying about their teachers, it seems vital.

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hermyknee
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Pickpick

Educators, everywhere, read this book.

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools is well-researched, powerfully written, and important.

I listened to the book in its entirety on audible and highly recommend it. I have also ordered a paperback copy for note taking purposes.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

#teachersoflitsy #blitsy

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hermyknee
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“I‘m mad at myself that I couldn‘t juggle both.”

Black girls internalize, very early on, the idea that their well being comes secondary to others. Our policies, our public rhetoric about healing, even our protests all make the pain of black females an afterthought to the pain of black males....The idea that black girls have to hold the pain of black boys, even at their own expense, is a form of internalized sexism.

*continued in comments*

hermyknee But when it‘s couched as a matter of being a ‘ride or die‘ girlfriend, many girls never see that by accepting these conditions, they become complicit in their own oppression. For girls like Heaven, getting an education is not only a rehabilitative act, it‘s an act of social justice. (edited) 12mo
hermyknee Education, particularly formal education, is a primary avenue for accessing greater opportunity. Those who are pushed to the margins are often rendered too powerless to manage a clear vision of what a Truly inclusive learning environment even looks like, let alone how they might participate in ways that will support their well-being as learners, as black girls, and as negotiators of their own destiny.” (edited) 12mo
90 likes2 comments
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hermyknee
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Jennifer had been sex trafficked and her sexual victimization and three year absence from school facilitated an academic lag. Her relationship with educational institutions needed a lot of nurturing. The juvenile court school was the location inside juvenile hall with the most potential to begin this repair. This was particularly important in light of how Jennifer envisioned her future. “I care about kids,” she said.

*Quote continued in comments*

hermyknee “I care about kids,” she said. “When I get older I want to, like, teach somebody instead of locking them up. Because I feel, I mean, we‘re inmates but we‘re still kids. You know a lot of these kids in here go through a lot of stuff.” (edited) 12mo
hermyknee Jennifer understood the key role of teachers and wanted to present a different environment for young women who were “going through a lot of stuff.” Her persistent frown suggested that she had first hand-knowledge of the ways in which girls were routinely subjected to dehumanizing treatment both in and out of the classroom. 12mo
zsuzsanna_reads 😢 So tragic, but such a brave young woman! 12mo
AmberWB This sounds amazing. Think I am going to order it right now- sounds like what a lot of my kids experience. 12mo
hermyknee @AmberWB you should. I only have it on audible right now, but I think I am going to order the paperback. There are a lot of spots I‘d like to revisit. 12mo
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hermyknee
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Another 1 hour and 23 minutes in the books for #24in48 listening to Pushout. This chapter hits on a particularly important issue that affects girls in schools with curvaceous body types, especially black girls, and highlights the need for a change in social discourse surrounding dress code and the sexualization of female bodies. Morris examines how exclusionary discipline targets & negatively impacts black girls and students in transition. #LGBTQ

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hermyknee
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I fell asleep before #24in48 got started last night, but I‘m listening to Pushout this morning.

I need to get this one on the reading list for teachers where I work!

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hermyknee
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Beginning this one on #audible today. I think it‘s going to be a tough one, but so important. It was published in 2016, but is absolutely still relevant today.

#nonfiction2019 #teachersoflitsy

101 likes4 stack adds
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ness
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tfw the library buys the book you asked for! It must have been a popular request because I‘m fourth in line.

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DanielleRobinette
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Pickpick

This book is recommended to everyone. But it should be REQUIRED reading for anyone working with kids or in education or in juvenile justice. I was a teacher in KY before leaving the profession to go to law school. I so wish I had known this book then. I would change so much about my time as a teacher knowing what I know now. I also have a strong urge to send this to the administrators that I worked under as a teacher. Definitely read this book.

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PatriciaU
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Pickpick

I read this in one night. Pushout was recommended to me by a friend who has been an advocate and activist for urban students and parents for decades. This book should be required reading for teachers, librarians, and anyone else who works with Black girls. Powerful, shocking truths contained within.

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Cortg
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Pickpick

Some of what the author discusses I agree with, some I did not. I felt much of it was one sided and the girls were looking to place the blame on someone else. On the other hand, these girls don‘t have role models and people to guide them on the importance of an education. My 1st job was teaching in an inner city school, I get it! It‘s frustrating.
My daughter‘s text to me an hour after I finished the book. Wow! If only every child had this.

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LaurenReads
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Pickpick

As an educator in an urban school this is a must read. The author focuses on girls in middle and high school, but the ideas can be applied to any age level. Its so sad to hear about how girls and LGBT students are treated in school/society, how difficult it is to get back into school after an arrest, how judged and punished students are for stupid things. Teachers/community need to take the time to develop relationships to support students.

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bookwrm526
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Pickpick

Finished this one last night. It was a book club pick. It was a good read, though it was just as difficult as you'd expect, and it wasn't exactly what I wanted to be. I love how much the author incorporates the voices of the girls who participated in the research. (Image from the web)

39 likes2 stack adds
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Erin01
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Pickpick

my most recent nonfiction read for #marchintoreading
this was not a fun book to listen to but once I started I didn't want to put it down for long, an absolute must read for anyone interested in the crimilization of black girls in schools or the treatment of young black girls in general
🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

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Erin01
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This book is so important, I'm really enjoying it so far but also wish it wasn't necessary - school should be a safe place & asking questions should be praised, not something that makes someone be marked as disruptive

Moray_Reads Just the blurb is horrific. How on earth does this situation exist?! I'm stacking it but I'll need to fortify myself before I can tackle it 3y
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Erin01
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my library just added a bunch of new books onto its overdrive site (I have a bad habit of checking the recently added list quite frequently, even though there is hardly ever anything new, because I love being one of the first to check something out), and the cover of this one jumped out at me + it's on a topic I want to learn more about

readordierachel This one's on my list as well. 3y
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lowellette
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Pickpick

Important takeaways for all community members--not just schools.

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lowellette
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ZoeyPeacock The term "American Exceptionalism" is a term Europeans used in the early 19th century to poke fun at Americans. It does not mean we are exceptional. Agree 100 percent with the rest though!! 3y
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BookishFeminist
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Just finished watching the Republican Convention & I now need to recover. So this is happening. Pushout is such a great read so far on how Black girls are treated & criminalized in school, from fellow students, teachers, & the system, and how it can dictate their safety & stability in the future. Looking forward to learning a lot. 🍷 #ReadWomen #BlackLivesMatter #WNDB

Twocougs I'm going to need to read that one. I also need a counter balance to all the blame, fear, and anger I heard tonight. 4y
BookBabe Mango sorbet? 4y
Mayread I watched one clip & noped the fuck offline. Did you know that protesters can't carry tennis balls but are allowed to carry firearms (including long guns) due to OH gun laws? Nope. Nope. Nope. 4y
See All 21 Comments
BookishFeminist @Twocougs Ditto, I was live tweeting it for a while & was then like THANK GOD IT'S OVER. Hoping to purge my brain of the hatred by learning. 4y
BookishFeminist @BookBabe Orange sherbet! 🍊 4y
BookishFeminist @Skiles Yep! Toy guns are also banned, but real guns aren't. Makes no sense. Total respect for folks with different political beliefs than me but I 100% can't get behind bigotry, hatred, & anti-gun regulation stuff. I mostly stuck around for the laughs but my brain hurts. 4y
WordWaller Oh I just added this on GR! From the list I blogged about (: 4y
SoniaC I watched a few minutes of it announcing its running mate this Saturday and just couldn't stomach it at all. 4y
BookishFeminist @SoniaC Yea I can't with them. It's a bit like watching a multi-ring self-loathing circus. 4y
BookishFeminist @WordWaller Yes! I recommend it so far--I'll have to check out your blog post. 4y
Notafraidofwords You're brave. I can no longer watch any of it without getting heartburn lol. 4y
Shortstack Glad you said it's good so far. May have to pick this up eventually. Too many books. Too little time. 😁📚💔 4y
SoniaC @BookishFeminist yes sadly it's a lot like that. How lovely it's wife stole the speech of a truly remarkable woman. It just makes me angry! Anyways I should be nice don't want to offend anyone. 4y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa At this point I feel like Trump is pulling the biggest Punk'd ever on the GOP. I'll quote the clan, you'll still vote for me; I say I could shot someone and still be elected, you'll vote for me; I disparage vets & the disabled, you cheer; my wife repeats the Democratic First Lady's speech, a.... 4y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ...woman you can stand 90% of the time, and if MO had read it you would have booed and jeered, but my wife you'll clap and cheer and wholeheartedly defend her right to plagiarize it. 4y
BookishFeminist @Notafraidofwords LOL I am right there with you. To me it's a bit like watching a train wreck where I can't look away. Especially when jokes abound on Twitter! 4y
BookishFeminist @Shortstack So true! The plight of a reader. I'll definitely post my full review when I'm done. So far it's an important but difficult read. 4y
BookishFeminist @SoniaC Yea completely agreed, and more plagiarism scandal after tonight. Incredible how it always seems to be a Black woman they steal from, especially one they spend so much time tearing down. It's maddening. (You can post whatever here & I won't be offended, btw – I can't speak for others but as long as we're respectful I think it's alright.) 4y
BookishFeminist @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yea I completely agree. Makes me sick, especially when they spent so much time dragging the Obamas & Clintons down only to emulate their work. Especially maddening about Melania's plagiarized MO speech which is literally riding off the coattails of a Black woman while taking credit for "doing the work herself" & then spewing racist remarks. 2016 can just end already tbh. 4y
SoniaC @BookishFeminist I have a great deal of respect for Michelle Obama she is a strong, intelligent, and classy woman. I find Trump and his cronies difficult to stomach. It scares me that people actually respect and look up to a man who is so clearly a narcissist. 4y
BookishFeminist @SoniaC Yea I feel the same way. And I don't have much sympathy for the GOP establishment that's tried to distance themselves from him either—the party (not everyone in it obviously but many elected officials) have been fear-mongering & spewing hate for at least a solid decade now, from the tea party to its various iterations & laws that reinforce hateful conventions. They didn't speak out then & now they've got this monster. 4y
95 likes37 stack adds21 comments
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GabrielleMRO
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This cover is incredible. I'm excited to teach this book in the fall. Very hard realities.

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