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LadyCait84

LadyCait84

Joined December 2017

“And she's reading again. How novel.“
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LadyCait84
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Pickpick

The premise is bleak — in the not-too-distant future, as a result of climate change, an ancient plague emerges from beneath the melting ice of Siberia and the consequences for humankind are catastrophic and far-reaching — but the book, for all of its death and grief and bizarre sci-fi elements, is beautifully bittersweet, filled with both love and hope.

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LadyCait84
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I have conflicting feelings* about the story itself, but am not at all conflicted about the quality: it‘s an intricate, powerful observation of family relationships & of the false, or at least fragile, security offered by social roles, rules, & constructs.

*Wondering if anyone else had really emotional reactions to the way adoption was handled?

71 likes3 stack adds
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LadyCait84
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Pickpick

It was a stroke of genius to have this story of love, trauma, promises, and growth — set mostly against a backdrop of civil unrest (building to war) on the island of Cyprus — partially narrated by a sentient fig tree.

62 likes1 stack add
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LadyCait84
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I liked this second installment of “the Emmy Lake Chronicles” even more than the first — largely thanks to its focus on Britain‘s women war workers. This gave me a glimpse at a practical problem I‘d never thought much about: childcare during WWII. Nobody‘s ever mentioned who was watching Rosie the Riveter‘s kids, you know?

At any rate, I always appreciate books that spark my curiosity and send me on a research tangent.

KathyWheeler You know, now that I think about it, I‘ve never read anything about what women did for child care during WWII. 3w
55 likes1 stack add1 comment
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LadyCait84
Dear Mrs. Bird | A J Pearce
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A nice, light read (mostly; book can‘t be entirely light with a backdrop of London, 1941 and The Blitz and all that) starring a plucky young woman who makes a mess of things with the best of intentions.

I liked it enough that I just placed the sequel on hold at the library.

Dragon There‘s a sequel! - I have to read it- I enjoyed this one - thanks for the heads up 💚🐉 1mo
LadyCait84 @Dragon Yes — the sequel is called “Yours Cheerfully” and there is going to be a third one as well, I believe! 1mo
Dragon Thanks @LadyCait84 I checked it out on Libby after I read your post and managed to get the audiobook 💚🐉 1mo
61 likes1 stack add3 comments
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LadyCait84
One by One | Ruth Ware
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Final read of 2022, finished with about 45 minutes to spare.

While bummed that unseasonably mild temperatures have undermined my original reasoning for reading this snowed-in thriller in winter, I am glad that I was at least still right about Ruth Ware being reliable.

She‘s become a go-to for me; even when I call a “twist” early, it never prevents me from enjoying the rest of the book. Not something I can say about many authors in the genre.

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LadyCait84
Home Body | Rupi Kaur
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Mehso-so

Third Rupi Kaur collection & least favorite. Some of the poems reference the capitalist/commodifying pressures she was under to force out more work, fast…& if fully autobiographical, that explains a lot about the uneven quality.

However, I still very much admire the way she writes — revealing her hurts, her rages, her inconsistencies, with an honesty that seems as much for her catharsis as to offer the communal comfort: “You are not alone.”

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LadyCait84
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So often in his poetry, Ocean Vuong follows a stanza of cloudy (yet evocative) metaphor with a line so sharp with clarity that it makes me gasp out loud.

Sometimes, I‘m not sure my mind fully understands what he‘s saying, but it feels like my heart does.

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LadyCait84
Matrix | Lauren Groff
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Groff‘s prose is gorgeous & rhythmic.

The “story” is not traditionally structured, reading instead like a biography (though almost entirely fictional) of the medieval abbess who inspired it. So it doesn‘t build tension to a climax & resolution. It rides along choppy ups & downs, with full decades glossed over.

But the character study is compelling. The social observation sharp, & still largely relevant (despite the 12th century setting).

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LadyCait84
Midnight in Everwood | M.A. Kuzniar
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A darkly fantastical (and feminist) retelling of The Nutcracker. Though far from flawless, it‘s thoroughly enjoyable and gorgeously atmospheric thanks to Kuzniar‘s mighty pretty prose.

emz711 Is it a young adult read? 2w
LadyCait84 @emz711 It‘s not technically a YA, but is a bit of a bildungsroman/coming-of-age story. Though a little on the darker side. (edited) 2w
60 likes4 stack adds2 comments
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LadyCait84
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An early gift from my husband & what a delightful read for my Christmas Eve.

While there are goblins & rogue fireworks & Elvish writings that feel reminiscent of the Tolkien classics I‘ve read (and re-read) previously, this collection of letters he wrote to his own children (under the guise of Father Christmas) is a familial treasury of holiday memories…that just so happens to also showcase a great author‘s genius & wit & imagination.

57 likes1 stack add
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LadyCait84
A Princess for Christmas | Jenny Holiday
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Mehso-so

Essentially a Hallmark movie in book form (which the characters themselves acknowledge frequently), but with some steamier bits thrown in for good measure. I always think I‘m going to enjoy fluffy, seasonal reads more than I actually do? But it was nice reading this (and dozing off intermittently) while sharing blankets with my doggos as a literal blizzard raged outside.

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LadyCait84
Galatea: Short story | Madeline Miller
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A super short, fast, and easy read that packs a punch.

Despite my enduring love for “My Fair Lady,” the myth of Pygmalion (on which both that musical and this story are based) has long given me the uh-oh feeling. In Galatea, Madeline Miller uses her beautiful prose to reveal the depth of the misogyny in the original tale…and offer a sharp and satisfying bit of retribution.

SusanLee I‘ve only read Circe and I‘ve given it 5/5. I wonder how is this compared to Circe? 2mo
LadyCait84 @SusanLee Since this is only a short story, some of the things I loved about Circe (the fullness of the story, the scope and reach of her character arc) aren‘t applicable. But, the prose/style I loved about Circe and even some of the ferocity in character, are on full display here too. 2mo
ozma.of.oz I need to bump this up my to read list a lot now! 2mo
SusanLee @LadyCait84 thanks! I do enjoy her prose so will look it up 🙏🏻 2mo
46 likes1 stack add4 comments
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LadyCait84
The Night Watchman | Louise Erdrich
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This was the month‘s book club pick and what a masterpiece…very evident why it won the Pulitzer.

Despite being 400+ pages, it reads quickly thanks to short chapters and the focus shifting between characters to maintain momentum. Erdrich used a lot of familial (and National) history to build this book, and the weight of that brings even more beauty to how deftly she handles the coexistence of humor and heartbreak.

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LadyCait84
The Hunger Games Trilogy | Suzanne Collins
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Re-read these in preparation for marathoning the movies with my husband this weekend. (He just read them for the first time so I‘m finally permitting him to see the films; it was important to me that he had the books‘ context first so he could fully appreciate the amazingness of Peeta while watching.)

At any rate, they really held up for me. I loved books one & two as much as the first time I read them & actually liked Mockingjay more this time.

Books_Equals_Life Absolutely love the Hunger Games, Divergent, and Maze Runner! I really needed something similar and recently read The Water Walls by iLana Markarov, which I will be reviewing today. It's also really good if you are a big fan of fantasy dystopias. 2w
57 likes1 stack add1 comment
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LadyCait84
Book of Cold Cases | Simone St James
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So, I‘ve long been fascinated with the incredible popularity of true crime, especially among women. This book hints at one possible why, as its protagonist uses her cold case obsession to distance/distract herself from personal past traumas while taking on a position of potential power as the investigator. I‘m excited to chat about it all at my book club (many members of which are BIG true crime fans) tomorrow.

SamAnne 🤔. Interesting theory. 3mo
51 likes1 comment
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LadyCait84
Frankenstien | Mary Shelley
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Hadn‘t read this in 20+ years and appreciated it so much more this time around. Not only from having a better understanding of it‘s literary significance than I did as a teen, but also due to the influence of all the Victor roast-posts I‘ve seen around the interwebs over the last few years. Victor really is the WORST, and approaching the novel from that angle made it more fun to read.

SamAnne I reread it a couple years ago while reading Frankissstein which I thought was a hoot. 3mo
50 likes1 stack add1 comment
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LadyCait84
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Much like its predecessor, this installment in Carr‘s Kreizler series will mostly appeal to those who love crime AND historical fiction genres. It‘s dense; full-to-bursting with details of old New York geography, architecture , cultural factoids and real people cameos. It‘s also very dark. But if you love the idea of 600+ pages spent pondering the why of a serial killer while running around an immersive replica of 1897 NYC, this book is for you.

KathyWheeler I liked The Alienist, but I loved this book. (edited) 4mo
LadyCait84 @KathyWheeler Was it Stevie‘s narration that made the difference for you? It‘s hard for me to say which book I liked better, but I definitely felt like Stevie‘s POV was a big pro in favor of The Angel of Darkness. I‘m still holding onto a hope Carr will one day publish another one in the series from Sara‘s perspective. 🤞🏻 4mo
KathyWheeler It was indeed Stevie‘s narration that did it for me. I keep hoping for another book as well. 4mo
Bookzombie I somehow read this one first years ago. I loved it and think I may have to reread it. @KathyWheeler I also keep hoping for another book. There is an entry on Goodreads but there has never been a publication date announced. 🙁 4mo
42 likes4 comments
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LadyCait84
Bewilderment | Richard Powers
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Meteoric and intense, I read this book bracing for impact and annihilation…but my, what a beautiful ride.

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LadyCait84
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I‘m deeply ashamed to admit I‘d not read this one before, but what a delight now that I‘ve finally caught up with the masses.

Fun, fast, and about a crime that you don‘t really mind happened since the “victim” was a monster.

Plus, I finally get why Hercule Poirot is so beloved.

Looking forward to watching at least one of the adaptations this weekend — open to recommendations as to which one is best!

MommyWantsToReadHerBook Haha, shame on you! 😜 Welcome to the club! 5mo
Dragon I have to go with the Kevin Branagh adaptation ( even though he‘s not my favourite Poirot) . The cinematography and the costumes- so well done 5mo
63 likes1 stack add2 comments
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LadyCait84
Lady Susan | Jane Austen
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Finished #AustenianAugust with one of Jane‘s earliest works. Her fierce wit (and cheeky humor) are on full display throughout this novella, comprised of letters detailing the exploits of the beautiful-charming-and-utterly-despicable titular character. Enjoyed it immensely, but am very glad Austen‘s longer works were centered on more likable characters.

Gissy Pretty photo! 5mo
59 likes1 comment
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LadyCait84
Harlem Shuffle: A Novel | Colson Whitehead
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Spent the afternoon discussing my book club‘s August read while we all relaxed poolside with boozy popsicles. A nice day.

I really enjoyed the characters in this one — including the character of Harlem itself — and Whitehead is an absolute artist of word and phrase.

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LadyCait84
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Definitely a niche read — a love of Austen (and familiarity with her six completed novels) as well as a fondness for cozy mysteries are prerequisites here — but such a fun one.

Kudos to Gray for how expertly she played with these beloved characters; I think Austen herself would have enjoyed it immensely.

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LadyCait84
Ayesha at Last | Uzma Jalaluddin
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First read of #AustenianAugust was this modern, Muslim retelling of Pride & Prejudice.

Really enjoyed it for both the elements that made the story familiar and all the twists that made it new and fresh. Also, drank a lot of chai as I read in solidarity with the characters…‘twas delicious.

Scochrane26 I liked this one mainly for what I learned about the Muslim culture. The characters are good, too. 6mo
53 likes1 comment
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LadyCait84
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Liked this installment even more than the first as already knowing the key characters and relationships made it easier to lean into the shenanigans and fully enjoy this absurd and bumpy ride.

Looking forward to the next one.

Twainy This book cracked me up! I think I read the ARC. But you‘re correct, I liked it more than book one … and I enjoyed book one! 6mo
51 likes1 comment
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LadyCait84
The Paris Library: A Novel | Janet Skeslien Charles
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A good pick for fans of historical fiction, dual timelines, & those who like stories about the power of reading and the bonds books can forge. It keeps many of the horrors of WWII at a distance, with only scattered mentions of battles, prisoners, the camps. Instead it focuses on the intimate wear & tear of relationships as ordinary people make choices that suddenly have enormous consequences in Nazi-occupied Paris.

55 likes2 stack adds
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LadyCait84
Sea of Tranquility: A Novel | Emily St. John Mandel
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It‘s been a while since I‘d read a book in a day, but I suspect I‘d have done so with this one even if I wasn‘t participating in Dewey‘s #reversereadathon. Emily St. John Mandel has become one of my favorites and this perfectly exhibits why - normal human dramas show sharply against a far-flinging sci-fi concept, and it‘s also executed with clean prose and perfect pacing.

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LadyCait84
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Suffragette witches, led by a trio of sisters who charmed me with their messy bonds, fierce love, and cohesive rage. Adored this one.

And as I finished it during the first hour of Dewey‘s #reversereadathon, I completed the first part of the readathon‘s Book Reports Challenge (draw a picture that shows what your book is about) with this doodle of Beatrice Belladonna Eastwood.

Scochrane26 Very cool drawing 7mo
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LadyCait84
What Comes After: A Novel | JoAnne Tompkins
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Spent the evening finishing this (& baking peach pies) to prep for book club tomorrow.

The book‘s depiction of what it takes to truly live — rather than merely exist — with grief, to forge ahead after loss, feels messy but true.

Healing ebbs & flows. Rage is stripped away slowly, layer by layer. Whatever must be forgiven may need so again & again before it sticks. & the ordeal is so much more bearable with someone to continue living for...

melissajayne Such a good book 7mo
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LadyCait84
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I read this book with a near-constant smile on my face and the sweetest aching in my heart.

Infinitely charming, full of so much whimsy and warmth. I love it when books feel like a hug, and this one was just a wonderful squeeze from start to finish.

63 likes2 stack adds
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LadyCait84
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A story dominated by sadness, mostly rooted in the tightly-held secrets that keep healing, understanding, closure out of reach for many of the characters involved.

The author approaches it like a thriller, but works to slowly reveal all the hows and whys rather than a who or the what. In some ways, this makes it easier on the reader — to move between perspectives and points in time, rather than sitting with any single agony for too long.

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LadyCait84
The Paris Apartment | Lucy Foley
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After being disappointed in The Guest List, I was a tad apprehensive about this being my book club‘s May selection. However, I ended up really enjoying this one — another fun setting but the layering of clues and misdirects and reveals felt more sophisticated and well-paced. Did want to break out my editing pen a few times though…

Beachbum I enjoyed this one! I hope you do too 8mo
Beachbum Sorry , I reread your post… I‘m glad you enjoyed it too 👍🏻😉 8mo
60 likes2 stack adds2 comments
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LadyCait84
A Thousand Ships | Natalie Haynes
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Pulling from every corner of the Trojan War, this offers overdue depth &dimension to the female cast of Homer‘s epics. I appreciate that it gives voice to Penelope‘s frustration & fatigue, something I‘ve wanted since reading The Odyssey. (I prefer a woman to a symbol. Let her be more than her fidelity.) I also came to know & feel for characters like Iphigenia, Creusa, Andromache - typically footnoted names I‘d long forgotten or maybe never knew.

jen_the_scribe I have this one waiting for me on my shelf… lovely reading your review. 8mo
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LadyCait84
You Exist Too Much | Zaina Arafat
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It‘s an exploration of the protagonist‘s traumas and desires, and the relationship between them. I found it to be quite sad — perhaps more than was intended — but was moved by both its raw honesty and surprising optimism.

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LadyCait84
Honey Girl | Morgan Rogers
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I liked the protagonist, Grace Porter, and her story of discovery, healing, and romance.

But I loved the cast of almost unbearably charming characters that made up her chosen family.

Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks Awesome cover ❤️ 9mo
50 likes1 stack add1 comment
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LadyCait84
Malibu Rising | Taylor Jenkins Reid
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I felt fond (and protective) of the four Riva siblings at the center of the story. But mostly felt glad to not be rich or famous…or even remotely close to those who are rich or famous. They sound exhausting.

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LadyCait84
The Push | Ashley Audrain
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My book club discussion of this tense thriller focused on the ambiguities of what transpired throughout the novel as well as the certainties of the damage caused by societal pressures and intergenerational trauma. Definitely not an easy read (one of the moms in our club had to tap out; anyone with child or motherhood related triggers should approach with caution) but one that leaves you with plenty to contemplate.

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LadyCait84
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Sweeping and seductive and left me in tears.

Worth the hype. Definitely recommend.

60 likes1 stack add
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LadyCait84
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With a delightfully outlandish premise — a struggling author gets mistaken for a hired gun, then a mystery of murders and mobsters ensues — this was a fast, fun read.

Have already put the sequel on hold at the library.

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LadyCait84
Monster in the Middle | Tiphanie Yanique
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Conceptually fascinating and structurally distinct, the novel is a love‘s origin story — one that spans decades and continents before its lovers are even born.

Yanique‘s writing style is fluid and lovely, making it easier for the reader to flow along with the jumps in time, in place, in perspective.

How are we romantically readied, or thwarted, by loves of the past - not only our own, but also those of our mothers and fathers?

BarbaraBB I‘ve been very intrigued by this one. 11mo
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LadyCait84
Mostly Dead Things | Kristen Arnett
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Mehso-so

Grief is messy. And so is Jessa, the central character here. But she felt incredibly real to me, in all her mess and misery, as she avoided dealing with losses old and new.

That realness of Jessa is one the book‘s true high points, as are the author‘s detailed descriptions of the taxidermy process, nimbly jumping from graphic to poetic and back again.

But something kept the book from fully clicking for me…

50 likes1 stack add
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LadyCait84
This Time Next Year | Sophie Cousens
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Not my usual genre, but an enjoyable first read for the year (selected for its New Year‘s Eve framework).

There‘s a sweet romance at the novel‘s core, but it‘s surrounded by self-discoveries and solid friendships and renewed familial affections…all of which offer love stories of their own.

38 likes1 stack add
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LadyCait84
84, Charing Cross Road | Helene Hanff
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What a delight for my last book of 2021!

Short and quick, it‘s a charming collection of real-life letters sent between an American writer and the British bookseller who tracked down old, out-of-print tomes for her over their 20-year friendship, which was sustained solely through letters and a shared love of books.

Leftcoastzen ❤️❤️❤️ 13mo
suvata Wonderful book ♥️ 13mo
60 likes2 stack adds2 comments
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LadyCait84
Luster: A Novel | Raven Leilani
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Mehso-so

Just finished this, the last book club read for 2021, and feel uncertain and conflicted. Leilani‘s style is often graphic and harsh, but also fluid and beautiful. The story itself, often painful. And I just kept wanting better for, and from, the characters.

Might take me a bit to determine if I liked it. And longer still to figure out if I understood it.

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LadyCait84
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The ideas at the center of this book are not new or surprising: Families are complicated; Disappointing those we love, and being disappointed by them, is inevitable. But Straub‘s characters pulled me along and made me care about their complicated family, their litany of disappointments…made me care about them, even as they exchange boneheaded mistakes and clumsy apologies.

Honestly, a pretty fitting read for Thanksgiving weekend?

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LadyCait84
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Told from alternating perspectives separated by centuries, this book uses history as its mystery — and demonstrated how studying past lives can illuminate revelations about our own.

I do have a few bones to pick with the modern protagonist — as a former history major myself, her choices at the end of the novel were incomprehensible and could not hold. Overall, though, I really enjoyed this one.

57 likes1 stack add
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LadyCait84
The Year of the Witching | Alexis Henderson
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Fitting seasonal read with a strong feminist core.

Its setting - in both time and place - is fictional, but pulls strongly from historic influence (17th century Salem, the Crusades) as well as classic dystopian stories (Handmaid‘s Tale, for example).

Those who like witchy things, and/or have felt the burn of righteous fury over patriarchal injustices, should pick this one up.

sleepy.ash87 I just placed it on hold through my library. Can't wait to start! 1y
66 likes4 stack adds1 comment
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LadyCait84
Hurricane Season | Fernanda Melchor
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Mehso-so

This book is a horrific nightmare, just as it intends to be.

Melchor overpacks relentless violence into just 210 pages, forcing you to sit in discomfort with the ugliest realities human beings can create…and somehow endure.

I think it‘s an important work to exist. The author is fiercely talented, and honestly brave to write so unsparingly. But I struggle with the notion of “recommending” it to anyone, given how awful the book made me feel.

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LadyCait84
Hollow Kingdom | Kira Jane Buxton
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Clever and crude and absurdly comedic.

Narrated mostly by a foul-mouthed (but fiercely loyal and optimistic) domesticated crow, the book tells the story of a technology-induced zombie apocalypse from the perspective of pets. I laughed, I cried, I paused to ponder its social commentary.

Readers who are game for the outlandish premise (and are unfazed by colorful profanities) are in for a treat.

Ruthiella I have fond memories of ST! 1y
LadyCait84 He was a very likable (if rather unlikely) hero! And Dennis forever! 1y
65 likes2 stack adds2 comments
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LadyCait84
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Much like its predecessor, The Henna Artist, this novel pulls vibrancy from both of its lush settings — India‘s bustling “Pink City” & a cooler, quieter village in the Himalayan foothills. Written to satisfy fan-demand for more Malik, it also explores topics of class & entitlement, limitless familial loyalty,the risks & rewards of integrity…while taking many beloved characters on an exciting journey, set 12 years after the close of the first book.

scottsunderg66 Hi friend I'm glad to meet you here.. well I'm new here and still trying my best to understand Litsy Lol 😂 but I'd want to be friends with you... Get back to me by respond hi to my Gmail.. scottsundberg56@gmail.com 1y
scottsunderg66 What did you spend most of your time doing today? Are there any books you would recommend for me to read?.. 1y
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