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Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Wiggin
47 posts | 54 read | 15 to read
Talkative, ten-year-old Rebecca goes to live with her spinster aunts, one harsh and demanding, the other soft and sentimental, with whom she spends seven difficult but rewarding years growing up.
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review
TheAromaofBooks
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Mehso-so

The first half of this book was a pick. The second half really fell off and felt like Wiggin couldn't really decide where she wanted to take the story so it didn't go much of anywhere. However, I was glad to finally read this classic and enjoyed discussing its influence on Anne of Green Gables with the #KindredSpirits Is it plagiarism if you write it a million times better than the original? 😂

@TheBookHippie @BarbaraJean

TheBookHippie 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣💚💚💚💚💚 I do so agree!!! 2w
BarbaraJean Hahaha—improvement is not plagiarism! I love that copy of this!! 😍 2w
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review
BarbaraJean
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Pickpick

A soft pick for Rebecca! With all the #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead and #ChildrensClassicRead2024 discussion, I don‘t have a whole lot more to add. 😊 This is charming and sweet, and Rebecca as a character is delightful. However, the second half of the book was underdeveloped, and the ending felt rushed. Even so, I‘m glad I finally read this classic—it brought me joy (and it was fun to discover and goggle at all the Anne of Green Gables similarities!)

TheBookHippie I agree 💯. 3w
tpixie Great cover! I agree with your review!! 2w
40 likes2 comments
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BarbaraJean
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“In the actual—this painful kingdom of time and chance—are Care, Canker, and Sorrow; with thought, with the ideal, is immortal hilarity—the Rose of Joy; round it all the Muses sing.”

I remember LMM quoting and discussing this Emerson quote somewhere, maybe in a letter to MacMillan? Now I need to track it down! It‘s interesting to see it referenced here, in a children‘s book that LMM almost certainly read. #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

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BarbaraJean
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How did you feel about how the story wrapped up: with “Mr. Aladdin,” with Rebecca‘s aunts, and with Rebecca‘s family at Sunnybrook?

Would you want to read sequels to Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, or a series about Rebecca?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

TheAromaofBooks Just as an aside, this graphic is the same as the last one, so not everyone may realize that you actually asked a different question haha

I actually would be interested in reading sequels to Rebecca. I think the whole book would have been better if it had been two separate books and we could have devoted more time to her at school. I would totally read another book about her teaching adventures (if she has some). Apparently, Wiggin's nephew ⬇
3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Hahahaha—thank you!! Changing the graphic now!! 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) or someone rewrote the book/added stuff/created a sequel, although the GR reviews seem to agree it's terrible 😂 So I'll probably take a pass. 3w
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lauraisntwilder I would not want to read a sequel. In the absence of literally any other options, I have a feeling Rebecca would end up marrying Mr. Aladdin and I'm not interested in that. 3w
lauraisntwilder Oh, and I thought the ending, especially the actual last lines, was a letdown. It felt very much like the book didn't go anywhere. "There once was a family with too many kids, but then a aunt died and left them a house and they were all fine. Also, one of the kids went to school, but I'm not telling you about it." 3w
lauraisntwilder *aN aunt. 🙄 3w
rubyslippersreads I‘m actually reading the next book in the series, but I wouldn‘t call it a sequel. So far, it‘s just more stories set in the same time frame as the original. 3w
rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks I think I saw those. They seem to be retellings of the book with an emphasis on religion. I‘ll pass too. 3w
rubyslippersreads @lauraisntwilder I agree about Dean Priest, oops, I meant Mr. Aladdin. 🤣 3w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads - It's weird because while this book felt as religious as most books of that era (that is to say, the characters go to church, believe in God, and try to live up to “Christian morals“) it didn't feel like Rebecca was an especially church-focused character. So that seemed like an odd direction to go since it seems like you would have to kind of rewrite her character?? 3w
tpixie I knew Rebecca would end up with ‘ Mr Aladdin‘ , but it felt kind of creepy to me… 3w
tpixie I loved the evolution of Aunt Miranda- and the story of her crush dating and marrying her sister- how sad and brave she was to help her get ready for the dance. 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks I agree that if the second half had been fleshed out more, I would have liked the book better. So much of this needed more depth & development! But I'm not interested in the “sequels“ that do exist! @lauraisntwilder Yeah, the book made every indication she would end up with Adam. But I'd read the heck out of a sequel where Adam realizes he should be with Miss Maxwell and Rebecca goes on to have a brilliant teaching career. 3w
BarbaraJean @tpixie Yes, I loved being able to see a glimpse of Aunt Miranda's past and a little of what had made her who she was. It just felt like too little, and tacked on at the end instead of real character development through the novel. Honestly, all of the threads of the ending felt rushed and tacked-on! 3w
tpixie @BarbaraJean I totally agree with that rushed feeling of the ending. 3w
26 likes15 comments
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BarbaraJean
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Any further thoughts on parallels between Rebecca and LMM‘s Anne and Emily books?

And because I‘m super interested in everyone‘s thoughts: how does Adam Ladd compare/contrast with Dean Priest in the Emily books?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

BarbaraJean I have been waiting until I finished Rebecca to listen to this 2-part episode of the Gibson Girl podcast, which discusses the similarities between Rebecca and Anne of Green Gables. Check it out if you‘re interested! https://www.gibsongirlreview.com/season-1-episode-10/ 3w
lauraisntwilder Dean Priest and Adam Ladd both give me the creeps. Dean is definitely worse, Mr. Aladdin made me cringe every time he showed up in the second half. 3w
TheAromaofBooks I definitely think that LMM was influenced by this book. There are too many scenes that overlap for it to be coincidental. However, I don't think she just rewrote this story. So much of Anne is unique, and while she and Rebecca have some similarities, I'm not convinced that LMM based her actual character on Rebecca as much as she borrowed some of Rebecca's circumstances and gave them to Anne. I saw a few GR reviews link to this article ⬇ 3w
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TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) http://canadianicon.org/table-of-contents/mirror-images-anne-of-green-gables-and... and while I agreed with some of it, I also felt like some of their “mirrors“ were a bit of a stretch. For instance, yes Rebecca and Anne both “like nature“ but I never felt like that was an inherent and critical part of Rebecca, while it's hugely a part of Anne - which I think in turn is a reflection of LMM's own passion for trees⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) and the outdoors. I also didn't actually think that Emma Jane and Diana are much alike, beyond a basic “secondary character“ vibe. Emma Jane literally just feels like Rebecca needs a friend, so here she is, while Diana, once again, is an important part of Anne herself and her character development. The same with Matilda and Marilla - both grumpy old women, I guess, but wildly different in their relationship with the main character and in⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) the way they each develop (that is to say, Matilda doesn't). I definitely felt like the second half of the book is where Anne and Rebecca really diverge, with Anne having actual purpose, direction, development, and growth, while Rebecca continues to just be the same little girl she was all along - which is part of what adds to the creepiness of Adam Ladd tbh. There are parallels to Dean and Adam, although interestingly I actually found ⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) myself comparing Adam more to “Daddy Long-Legs“ - a book I do love, but have always felt like Daddy pulled the strings in the background to put Judy into situations where she would be maneuvered into falling in love with him. Dean's grooming feels much more active, with a personal correspondence and regular visits/discussions/etc. Adam is more in the background creating scenarios where Rebecca will be obligated/grateful/admire him. 3w
rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks Diana is much more of a kindred spirit to Anne than Emma Jane is to Rebecca. 3w
rubyslippersreads @lauraisntwilder I agree. Although when I first read these two books (probably at about age 10), any idea of possible “romance” with the older men went right over my head. (Thank goodness!) 3w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads - I agree! I don't feel like we ever see a real bond between Rebecca and Emma Jane beyond them being the same age and going to school at the same time, while Anne and Diana are genuinely involved and interested in each other's lives. And Anne definitely has a deep love for Diana that Rebecca never seems to show for Emma Jane. 3w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @lauraisntwilder - I feel like if I had read this book at a younger age I wouldn't have thought of Adam as a love interest. The signs are there as an adult reader, but he seems much more subtle of a character than Dean. 3w
rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks @lauraisntwilder I think the times were much different then, too. A wealthy husband would probably have been thought an excellent “catch” for Rebecca. The age difference might have even been considered a plus, because Rebecca was so “flighty.” 😏 3w
rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks @lauraisntwilder Dean Priest isn‘t subtle at all, and he gets creepier as the story goes on. Aunt Nancy warned Emily, “Never marry a Priest.” 😂 3w
lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads As a kid, I definitely wouldn't have picked up on Adam Ladd as a love interest, which makes it even creepier to me as an adult. Meanwhile, yes, bless Aunt Nancy, Dean was overtly interested in Emily. So gross. 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks The influence of Rebecca on Anne is undeniable! But I agree, LMM didn‘t just rewrite it. I like the idea that LMM borrowed some of Rebecca‘s circumstances & gave them to Anne. That early drive with Mr. Cobb/Matthew has so many similarities, but Anne & Rebecca are still distinctly different personalities. The podcast I linked above talks about how Anne is more impulsive and acts out of emotion, while Rebecca tends to be more ⬇ 3w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) reflective & considers her responses. Anne‘s “scrapes” are not at all like Rebecca‘s—I think that‘s one of the reasons why. I saw that “Mirror Images” article, too! Definitely, Anne‘s feelings for nature are SO different from Rebecca‘s. Their sense of home & place is different, too. Anne literally mourns the loss of beloved places. Rebecca saying goodbye to Sunnybrook is a very casual farewell compared to how it would have felt for Anne! 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads I did see some parallels with Emma Jane and Diana in that they both kind of get dragged along into their main-character friend‘s escapades. They‘re not the instigator, they‘re not imaginative, but they‘re loyal to their more passionate, dynamic, front-and-center friend. But the emotional impact of Diana in Anne‘s life is FAR different. Partly because Anne actually grows and changes!! 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks I like the Daddy Long-Legs comparison! Still ooky, but far different from the grooming and emotional manipulation we see with Dean. Adam is a LOT more subtle, but it's also that he seems more considerate of what‘s appropriate because of Rebecca‘s age. I appreciated how he always includes Emma Jean so he‘s not singling out Rebecca. That‘s FAR different than Dean‘s possessiveness. 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @ lauraisntwilder Like all of you, I wouldn‘t have seen Adam as a love interest if I‘d read this as a kid. But it bothers me now!! I get that the times were different, but I just can‘t be OK with a 30-something man looking at a 10 or 12-year-old kid and thinking “heeeeeyyy, wife material.” 3w
22 likes20 comments
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BarbaraJean
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Please join us to discuss the second half of Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm! #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

What did you think about the second half of the book, focusing on Rebecca‘s school years in Wareham? Any favorite scenes or quotes?

What growth and change do you see in Rebecca during her time at Wareham? (Or does she change?)

lauraisntwilder The second half moved too quickly. It felt like we were rushing to the end. And I didn't particularly like the ending! 3w
TheAromaofBooks I definitely liked the first half better than the second. The second half felt a lot choppier and less cohesive. I actually usually really enjoy school stories, but it almost didn't even feel like Rebecca was at school half the time?? It felt weird that all this time and money was spent without much of a goal (I guess so she could be a teacher) and then she just comes back and starts nursing various family members instead of using the education ⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) that the aunts sacrificed so much for?? I don't know, it was just kind of odd. I also definitely like Adam should be marrying the teacher instead of waiting for Rebecca to grow up, ick. There were parts and characters that I enjoyed, but overall the second half felt jumbled and rushed, and the ending seemed really abrupt. Like @lauraisntwilder I didn't really care for the ending. 3w
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sblbooks @lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks I agree. The ending did feel rush they tried to pack too much into one book this could have been a series for sure. The "age gap"romance in these books...why is that a thing? ? 3w
rubyslippersreads I wanted Adam to marry the teacher too. I agree that the first half of the book was better than the second. 3w
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder I thought it moved too quickly as well. It skips her whole 2nd year! @TheAromaofBooks The 2nd half felt both disjointed and “thin“ to me. I felt like the ending wanted to show her willingness to sacrifice her bright prospects out of gratitude for all the aunts had done for her/love for her family. But the emotional connection wasn't there because we didn't really see her school accomplishments or a deep connection to her family! 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @sblbooks I hadn't thought about Adam marrying the teacher, but that would have been SO much better and less creepy!! I get that the age gap was far more common/acceptable at the time, but it's the “Oh I'll wait for her to grow up“ idea that bothers me so much!! The age gap wouldn't be as creepy if they'd met later. 3w
TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean - That's the thing about the age gap to me, it's the “I have met this literal child and will now mold her into the wife I want to have in the future“ - more so in Emily, but a bit here as well. The actual difference in age wouldn't feel as bad if they met when the girl was already an adult. 3w
sblbooks @TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean Exactly! I guess the proper term would be grooming rather than age gap. 3w
TheAromaofBooks @sblbooks - Yes!! My husband and I are actually ten years apart and we get along great. But we didn't meet until I was 27, had dated other people, graduated from college, had a job, etc. - I was already my own person. This idea of molding a child so she turns into the ideal wife is pretty creepy. 3w
tpixie @rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks totally agree - the teacher & Adam are much more appropriate- and the ending was rushed. 3w
24 likes11 comments
review
lauraisntwilder
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Mehso-so

I don't know about this one. The beginning was really cute and there were some nice moments throughout, but it felt like Wiggin was in a hurry to finish. Rebecca's time at Wareham is so glossed over and, by that time, the relationship with Mr. Aladdin was starting to give me the creeps. It felt like we were racing towards a bad ending, which wasn't totally true. I didn't like the ending (too easy), but it wasn't as bad as I thought it might be.

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BarbaraJean
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“It isn‘t as if the heathen really needed me; I‘m sure they‘ll come out all right in the end… whatever God is, and wherever He is, He must always be there, ready and waiting.”

There are some awful stereotypes in the latter half of Rebecca‘s comments here, but I appreciate her underlying theology! #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

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Sace
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Mehso-so

⭐️⭐️
I enjoyed a lot this at first but once Rebecca got to high-school I really lost interest. I skimmed most of the last 30 percent.

#ChildrensClassicRead2024 @TheBookHippie

Edit- This was my #bookspin for this month too. I'm feeling pretty successful right now because I finished both this month. Yay me! @TheAromaofBooks

UwannaPublishme It did get a little slow toward the end. 4w
Sace @UwannaPublishme I started out really liking it at first but I got less and less interested as it went on. 4w
TheBookHippie I agree, the end dragged a bit. 4w
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Sace @TheBookHippie the discussion has prompted me to pull out my copy of Anne of Green Gables again. Actually reading it is the challenge 😂 4w
TheAromaofBooks Uhoh, I'm about halfway through, so I'll prepare myself 😂 4w
rubyslippersreads I agree that the end dragged somewhat. It seemed that one burden after another was piled on Rebecca, but she could handle everything cheerfully. Of course, I think some of that was children‘s literature of the time. Remember Anne facing duty as a friend, and Pollyanna‘s missionary barrel. 4w
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tpixie
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I enjoyed the narrator‘s subtle sense of humor. Rebecca, Heidi, and Anne of Green Gables all have a happy, great outlook on life. I loved Miranda, the curmudgeon- and watching her evolve as well as learning her back story at the very end of the book. The Cobbs were such a sweet couple. Thanks @TheBookHippie for another great #ChildrensClassicRead2024 #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAAdjacent Fun to join in with @BarbaraJean

UwannaPublishme Agreed! I really enjoyed Rebecca too, but Heidi is still my favorite. 😊 4w
tpixie @UwannaPublishme yes!! I did enjoy Heidi more as well! 4w
45 likes2 comments
review
Daisey
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Pickpick

I‘m not sure I‘ve read this since I first received a print copy as a kid. I enjoyed it then and I enjoyed listening to it now, but it‘s not a favorite. The beginning is great as Rebecca arrives at the home of her aunts and we read the details of that new life, but as the story goes on it moves very quickly and without so much descriptive detail.

#ChildrensClassicRead2024 #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent
#reread #audiobook

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Sace
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I'm ready for the #HyggeHourReadathon!
Beverage: none
Attire: comfy jammies
Mood: honestly a little blah. I haven't been able to focus on much lately. My reading has suffered. Part of it is I'm trying to read too many things at once. I also spend too much time on my phone. Hopefully I can reset my reading brain over the next couple of weeks.

@AllDebooks @DebinHawaii @Chrissyreadit @jenniferw88

Cuilin Here‘s to the reset. I had to do this recently too. Gave myself a good talking to. Reading is up this week. 4w
Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks 💛💛💛 4w
Sace @Cuilin I definitely need a good talking to. 4w
Chrissyreadit 💛☀️💛 4w
51 likes4 comments
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BarbaraJean
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A #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead reminder for the next couple weeks! We have two upcoming #LMMAdjacent discussions:
Saturday, June 1: Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm by Kate Douglas Wiggin (Chapters 16-end)
Saturday, June 8: Undine by Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué

My library doesn‘t have any print copies of Undine, but I‘ve found a bunch of digital versions on Libby and Hoopla. It‘s in the public domain, so it‘s also available via Project Gutenberg, etc.

TheAromaofBooks Yay!! I have no idea what to expect from this one! 4w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Me neither! I actually checked out two digital versions from the library last night! The one I got via Libby is from Project Gutenberg and is from a series called “Told to the Children.“ I'm skeptical because the text looks very different from the one I got on Hoopla. And it SAYS it has illustrations, but each link in the “List of Pictures“ goes to a point in the text where there should be an illustration—but there isn't. 🙄 ⬇ 4w
BarbaraJean The one I got on Hoopla looks more promising, and it has a couple of introductory essays (one by George MacDonald). Trying to decide whether to read those before or after the story. I hate it when intros have spoilers, and they so often do with older books! 4w
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julieclair Everand had an ebook version with the Arthur Rackham illustrations. I‘ll be reading that! 😀 4w
TheAromaofBooks @BarbarJean @julieclair - Many of these public domain books are being printed by Amazon publishers (or whatever you want to call them lol) in inexpensive paperback copies, so that's what I got. I think part of the difference in editions may also be different translators? I believe this was actually originally written in German. Mine is translated by Fanny Elizabeth Bunnett. With a name like Fanny, I'm assuming it's an old translation 😂 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Of course different translations! 🤦🏻‍♀️ I wonder which one LMM would have read… 3w
TheAromaofBooks I'm not completely sure how public domain works with translated books. Is it the original German text that is in the public domain and anyone can translate it? Or it is some of the early English translations that are now in the public domain? After nosing about a little I did find this list - https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Undine - which shows the years and translators, but I can't imagine these are the only ones. However, that means my edition ⬇ (edited) 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) translated by Bunnett is 1867. From what I've read, the illustrated version by Courtney, published in 1909, is the most popular. While trying to find out more about your “Told to the Children“ edition, I ended up on this GR page - read the “about the author“ section - https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15981399-stories-from-the-ballads-told-to-th... - she co-wrote a book with LMM! Her name did start to ring a bell in that ⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) context. Side note - scanning through the books she wrote there's one called “Dante for the Children“ 😂 😂 😂 I may have to get a copy of that!!! All that to say, it looks like there are several options for which translation LMM would have read. (I don't think she knew German, did she? There's always the outside chance she read it in the original language!), but probably NOT the Courtney or MacGregor versions - at least not at first - ⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) since those weren't published until the 1900s. Who translated your Hoopla edition, does it say? Looking back at the Amazon description of the edition I bought, the description says “An unabridged English translation of the story by William Leonard Courtney and illustrated by Arthur Rackham was published in 1909.“ But if you look the edition you're purchasing is translated by Bunnett. So that's not confusing😆 But there are a lot of ⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) editions available with Rackham's illustrations - I think those are what made that edition so popular. Apparently, they're kind of creepy haha One last note, what was really crazy to me reading this was the statement that THIS story came BEFORE Hans Christian Anderson wrote The Little Mermaid! He claims it as one of his influences for that story. Kind of wild. Anyway, I've rambled enough. It's just so interesting!!! 😂 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks With public domain, I think it‘s the translation itself that enters public domain once the translation‘s copyright date hits that threshold. It makes sense that the translation that appeared with the famous illustrations is the most popular! I‘d love to find a copy that mirrors that one, although that's not the one LMM read (at least not originally), since she first mentions Undine in her journals in 1889 (Oct. 24). I wonder if ⬇ 3w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) LMM read the Bunnett translation you have—it would have been the most recently published! But it really could have been ANY of those other than the Courtney. That Wikisource list is really helpful—I hadn‘t found a list of English translations yet! However, it doesn‘t clear up who translated either of the versions I have. 😂 Neither one has a publication date or any info about the translator. I figured both used one of the ⬇ 3w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) anonymous translations and started trying to match up the text using the Wikisource list. The Hoopla version seems to be the 1845 anonymous translation. But the “Told to the Children” one reads like a simplified version, so it looks like Mary Macgregor adapted an anonymous translation for kids. She‘s listed as the “Editor” on the copyright page of this version, and she‘s not listed as a translator of any of the versions on Wikisource. ⬇ 3w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) The differences between hers and the other texts are not translation-type differences! Here are the opening sentences of the two I have:
Hoopla (pub by Read & Co.): “On a beautiful evening, many hundred years ago, a worthy old fisherman sat mending his nets. The spot where he dwelt was exceedingly picturesque. The green turf on which he had built his cottage ran far out into a great lake; and this slip of verdure appeared to stretch...“ ⬇
3w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) ...into it as much through love of its clear waters as the lake, moved by a like impulse, strove to fold the meadow, with its waving grass and flowers, and the cooling shade of the trees, in its embrace of love. They seemed to be drawn toward each other, and the one to be visiting the other as a guest.“
Then the Macgregor version: “A fisherman brought a stool to the doorway of his home and, sitting down, he began to mend his nets. ⬇
3w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) ...His cottage stood in the midst of green meadows, and his eyes grew glad as he looked at the green grass. After the heat of the fair summer‘s day it was so cool, so refreshing.“
The Macgregor is SO abbreviated! I looked up the Bunnett version, and it's very similar to the Hoopla version (1845?). AND—it is so fascinating that Mary Macgregor of my “Told to the Children” edition was friends with LMM and co-authored a book with her!!! ⬇
3w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) Like you, reading that author description brought back vague recollections for me, from Rubio's discussions of other Canadian women writers. Honestly, I had dismissed reading the Macgregor version, but now the LMM connection makes me want to read both! (Dante for the Children?! 😂😂) I do want to look up the Rackham illustrations as I read, creepy or not 😂 Also: super interesting that this story influenced Hans Christian Andersen! 3w
TheAromaofBooks Definitely sounds like MacGregor is “retelling“ rather than translating! I'm getting the impression that she did a whole series of children's versions of various tales. Although why she would think Dante was important to tackle is beyond me 😂 I read the first chapter of Undine today and it was really intriguing!!! I'm excited to see where this story is going to go. Also, I was reading the first chapter of Little Women for #HashtagBrigade and ⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) couldn't believe that Jo mentions wanting to get a copy of Undine!!!! 3w
41 likes20 comments
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BarbaraJean
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So far—what similarities do you see between Anne of Green Gables and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm? Do these feel more like similar genre conventions or more like borrowing/copying?
To what extent are these kinds of similarities excusable, and when do they cross the line from “influenced by” into plagiarism? Where is that line for you?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

julieclair So many similarities… both girls are spunky little chatterboxes, they‘re smart, and natural leaders. They both have left situations where they were caring for several younger children, and have come to live with 2 older adults, siblings who have never been parents, one of whom is strict and the other more kindly. This is my first time reading Rebecca, and I kept thinking, “Wow, the author sure did borrow a lot from LMM.” Then I checked the copy ⬇️ 1mo
julieclair right dates and saw that Rebecca was written first, in 1903. Anne was written in 1908. So if there was any borrowing, it was the other way around. That gave me some pause, lol! This doesn‘t feel like actual plagiarism to me - can‘t exactly say why - but it does feel like copying. It makes me a bit uncomfortable on LMM‘s behalf. 😕 1mo
Sace It has been so long since I read Anne of Green Gables that I really can't point to any specific similarities beyond the obvious. To be honest I can't remember much about Anne. I'm not sure if I can say I like Rebecca more because I can't remember Anne...but I like this book more. I don't think I see LMM as copying or plagiarizing. I wonder if she just saw it as writing her own Canadian version. I hope I'm making a little sense. 1mo
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sblbooks Well, I can't say for sure...I think Wiggin could have a case against LMM for plagiarism. It makes me very sad since she's one of my favorite authors. I never knew about this since I've never read this book before. 4w
sblbooks There are numerous similarities between Rebecca and Anne. In addition, Emily of New Moon reminds me even more of Rebecca. When Adam Lads character was introduced the first thing I thought of was "creepy Dean" from the Emily series. 4w
TheAromaofBooks While there are definitely some similarities, I also do think that they are very different stories. There are many books about children having to go live with other people, and many stories about spunky, talkative girls. However, scenes like the drive to the new home and Rebecca having to stand in front of the class as a punishment definitely line up with similar Anne episodes. I still think Anne is far better written, and Anne herself - and ⬇ 4w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) secondary characters - much better drawn. Anne's story flows better, with a sense of Anne's character development and progression. Is it plagiarism if you take an idea and make it a lot better? 😂 I really am enjoying Rebecca, but the quality of writing is definitely far better in Anne. 4w
Daisey There are definitely some striking similarities. Like @sblbooks I also thought there were some parallels to Emily & Dean. I also agree with @TheAromaofBooks that those similarities are a pretty basic aspect. Additionally, although I enjoy Rebecca, I find Anne to be a much better story and LMM‘s writing much more descriptive. 4w
BarbaraJean @julieclair Yes, there are SO many parallels. I was skeptical about the plagiarism talk, but the similarities kept piling up! Characters, circumstances, scenes…there‘s even a similar antagonist at school, with Minnie Smellie (side note: character names just don‘t get better than that!). I like your distinction between plagiarism & borrowing/copying. To a certain extent, I don‘t think you can really plagiarize fiction—other than if you literally ⬇ (edited) 4w
BarbaraJean (Cont‘d) copy/paste someone else‘s writing. Even if the ideas/plot points are the same, HOW you write it will be different. There‘s that idea that there are only 7 basic plots—similar plots aren‘t plagiarism; it‘s about how you write that particular plot. But with these two books (and also the similarities @sblbooks mentions with LMM‘s Emily books), it seems to go beyond just drawing from similar plots & genres. It makes me uncomfortable, too! ⬇ 4w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) On the other hand, Anne & Rebecca are clearly different characters with different personalities. I need to read the rest of the book before saying this definitively, but it seems that LMM is doing different things with Anne than Wiggin does with Rebecca. I agree with @TheAromaofBooks and @Daisey—at least so far, I think there‘s more going on—more depth, better writing, more character development and progression—in AoGG than in RoSF. 4w
rubyslippersreads I agree with everyone who sees similarities between this book and Anne/Emily. I think what makes the difference is LMM‘s writing. Almost everyone knows about Anne (although some of that is probably due to the TV miniseries), but I don‘t think many people remember Rebecca. Only LMM has scholarly papers and conferences about her work. I think it‘s the quality of her writing that sets her apart. 4w
BarbaraJean @Sace I read somewhere that Anne of Green Gables was marketed as a Canadian Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm! But I‘ve also read that LMM got the idea for Anne from a newspaper story about an orphan girl sent to a couple by mistake, instead of a boy. That makes me think she was just working with a similar idea, at least initially—but that doesn‘t mean she didn‘t also draw from Rebecca. There are far too many similarities for it to be coincidence! 4w
BarbaraJean Here are a couple links that discuss the question of plagiarism & the similarities between these books:
https://teaandinksociety.com/plagiarism-montgomery-shared-universe/
http://canadianicon.org/table-of-contents/mirror-images-anne-of-green-gables-and...
I‘ve kind of skimmed both, because I want to avoid potential spoilers for Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm! But maybe we can revisit these next week.
4w
BarbaraJean @rubyslippersreads Yes, absolutely--I think there's more depth to LMM's writing. There are deeper themes and richer writing in Anne than we find in Rebecca. To be fair, there are more Anne books (as well as the miniseries and other adaptations), but I do think LMM's writing lends itself to deeper study than Rebecca does. Rebecca is charming and delightful, but I keep going back to the emotional depth in Anne. 4w
Sace @TheAromaofBooks This is the first time I am learning that the two books are so alike (sorry, never read them as a child). I've always assumed that they were two very different books. So now that I know how similar they are I can totally see LMM reading RoSB and thinking "Oh I can do this better. " 4w
julieclair Discussions like this are why I love Litsy so much! 4w
BarbaraJean @Sace I read Anne as a child, but this is my first time reading Rebecca. I'd heard the two books were very similar, down to accusations of plagiarism, but am experiencing those similarities for the first time. Now I see what people meant!! And I love the idea of LMM reading Rebecca and saying “hold my beer“—or rather, “hold my raspberry cordial“ 😂 @julieclair Me tooooo!! 4w
lauraisntwilder There are similarities, but the whole vibe is so different. Anne so desperately wants to stay at Green Gables, but Rebecca tries to run away from her aunts before the book is even half over. I like Rebecca, but it feels almost unfair to compare her to Anne, who is one of the most beloved characters of all time. 4w
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BarbaraJean
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“I‘m glad I said just what I did.”
“I dare say you are,” remarked Jane, with what might be described as one of her annual bursts of courage; “but all the same, Mirandy, it wasn‘t good manners,
and it wasn‘t good religion!”

I loved this exchange between Miranda and Jane—which later leads to the first softening we see in Miranda!

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

julieclair I loved this exchange, too. And I‘m hoping that Rebecca‘s presence will give Jane a burst of courage more often than just once a year. 😂 1mo
sblbooks Great quote! 4w
rubyslippersreads I just started this (though I know I‘ve read it before). The aunts remind me a bit of Aunt Elizabeth and Aunt Laura in Emily of New Moon. 4w
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BarbaraJean @rubyslippersreads I was thinking that as well. I think the aunts' relationship with each other as well as with Rebecca is very similar to the relationships between Emily/Aunt Elizabeth/Aunt Laura. There are also elements of the Miranda/Jane relationship that remind me of Aunt Chatty and Aunt Kate in Windy Poplars. 4w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @BarbaraJean - I do see some similarities between these two aunts and various aunts in LMM's fiction, but I also think that the grumpy+overbearing/secretly sunshine pairing is not uncommon, especially in stories set during an era when single women didn't just go off and live alone. As a side note, I definitely like Marilla better than Miranda! 4w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Yes, absolutely—it's not like the grumpy + happy pairing hadn't been done before, especially with the “maiden aunts“ or “maiden sisters“ trope. That's one of the things I'm having a hard time with over supposed “plagiarism“ or borrowing. A lot of this stuff wasn't new when RoSF was published. But there are a LOT of similarities all over the place in AoGG!! And yes—Marilla shows a sense of humor early on. Miranda not so much. 4w
lauraisntwilder @rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean I thought of Emily, Elizabeth, and Laura, too. 4w
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BarbaraJean
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What do you think of Rebecca as a character? Is she believable? Do you find her likable?
Which of the secondary characters are your favorites—either to love or love to hate?
What are your favorite scenes or quotes from the first half of the book?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

julieclair I adore Rebecca! As a child, I would have loved to have her for a friend. I think my favorite character is Mr. Cobb. The scene where he convinces Rebecca not to run away, and then devises a plan to get her back home unnoticed, was so heartwarming. I just wanted to hug him! 1mo
sblbooks @julieclair same here, all my favorites as well. 4w
TheAromaofBooks I was horrified when Rebecca threw her parasol in the well!!! I'm really enjoying this story overall - I'm still surprised that this is the first time I've read it! 4w
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BarbaraJean @julieclair @sblbooks I loved that scene with Mr. Cobb as well. Her relationship with the Cobbs is so sweet--I love the little description of when they take her to Milltown, and when they're so impressed by her poetry! @TheAromaofBooks Me too about the parasol!! It was such a prized possession!! That episode reminded me of the way the kids in Rainbow Valley decide to take on punishments in order to improve themselves. Another LMM parallel! 4w
rubyslippersreads I love the Cobbs. They remind me of Elnora‘s kind neighbors, the Sintons, in 4w
rubyslippersreads @BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Isn‘t there a similar “sacrifice “ scene in one of Louisa May Alcott‘s books? Maybe 4w
julieclair @rubyslippersreads I had totally forgotten about Limberlost! That‘s another one I never got around to reading. Stacked! 4w
BarbaraJean @rubyslippersreads I've never read Girl of the Limberlost OR Jo's Boys!! They're both on the never ending list... 4w
lauraisntwilder I like Rebecca, but I think reading this book with LMM isn't doing it any favors. I find LMM to be the better writer. Too much of Rebecca's charm is being conveyed in the narration and by other characters talking about her. When Rebecca does talk, she's charming. 4w
lauraisntwilder @julieclair @rubyslippersreads @BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks I haven't read Jo's Boys or Girl of the Limberlost either. More for my list! 4w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @julieclair @BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder - I thought Girl of the Limberlost was okay, but I actually liked her earlier book set the Limberlost better. I just reread my old review of Limberlost (8 years ago!) and it kind of came back to me that I loved the main character, but her mom was rather dreadful haha (edited) 3w
tpixie @julieclair Mr Cobb was the best! That was a great scene 🩵 2w
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BarbaraJean
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“When Joy and Duty clash,
Let Duty go to smash.”

😂 I just love Rebecca‘s personality!!

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

TheBookHippie I have to say I had no idea how lovely this book is. I‘m really enjoying it. 1mo
rubyslippersreads @TheBookHippie I‘m rereading it, but had forgotten how good it is. 4w
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Daisey
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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“Miranda Sawyer had a heart, of course, but she had never used it for any other purpose than the pumping and circulating of blood.”

It‘s been a long time since I‘ve read this one, so I‘m fitting in a reread on audio. This quote made me smile as I started listening. It‘s so much better than saying something like a heart of stone.

#LMMAdjacent #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #ChildrensClassicRead2024
#reread #audiobook #quote

julieclair Yes! This quote stood out for me, too. 💙 1mo
TheBookHippie I loved it too!!!! ♥️♥️♥️♥️ 1mo
BarbaraJean Ha! Yes—such a great description! 1mo
tpixie This was a wonderful quote!!! 4w
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BarbaraJean
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“Rise my soul, strain every nerve,
Thy mortgage to remove,
Gain thy mother‘s heartfelt thanks
Thy family‘s grateful love.”

I‘m definitely seeing the parallels between this and Anne of Green Gables (that opening chapter and Rebecca chatting with the driver!), but Rebecca is far more practical—Anne never wrote poetry about striving to pay off a mortgage. 😂😂

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #ChildrensClassicRead2024

julieclair Yes! Chatty Rebecca and Chatty Anne. 💙 I would love to read a book where the two of them meet and become friends! 1mo
BarbaraJean @julieclair I would love to read that fanfic!! They would likely be kindred spirits! 4w
julieclair But neither one of them would be able to get a word in edgewise… 😂 4w
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LitsyEvents
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repost for @BarbaraJean:

We‘ll start discussing our first #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent book next week! On Saturday, May 25, we‘ll chat about Chapters 1-15, and on June 1, we‘ll discuss chapters 16 through the end of the book.

This dovetails with the #ChildrensClassicRead2024 for May, hosted by @TheBookHippie —so if you‘re buddy reading there, feel free to drop in over here and join us to chat the next couple of Saturdays!

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BarbaraJean
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We‘ll start discussing our first #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent book next week! On Saturday, May 25, we‘ll chat about Chapters 1-15, and on June 1, we‘ll discuss chapters 16 through the end of the book.

This dovetails with the #ChildrensClassicRead2024 for May, hosted by @TheBookHippie —so if you‘re buddy reading there, feel free to drop in over here and join us to chat the next couple of Saturdays!

julieclair Yay! 1mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! Can't believe I am finally going to read this one LOL 1mo
Daisey I didn‘t think I was going to be able to fit a reread of this one in, but I need a light audiobook between more serious ones and started listening today. 1mo
BarbaraJean @Daisey Oh yay! Glad to have you for this one! 1mo
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TheBookHippie
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Sace I never realized how old the “which is better the book or the movie” debate was! 1mo
tpixie Fun info! Thanks 😊 4w
49 likes2 comments
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BarbaraJean
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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One of the reasons I wanted to read Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm as a #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent book is because of the similarities between it and Anne of Green Gables, and the controversy over whether there was plagiarism on LMM‘s part. Then I found this book cover online. Does this constitute reverse plagiarism? 🤣 #ChildrensClassicRead2024

julieclair Wow! 2mo
TheBookHippie Oh my word 😳 2mo
See All 13 Comments
charl08 Oops... 2mo
tpixie Oh wow!!! We are also reading this for #ChildrensClassicRead2024 2mo
LeahBergen 😆 2mo
Sace Uh… 😆 2mo
BarbaraJean @tpixie Yes! I moved my group‘s reading up a bit so the two could overlap and we could take part in both! 2mo
tpixie @BarbaraJean awesome!! 2mo
TheAromaofBooks Honestly hilarious haha Somehow I had never realized until I actually got a copy of this book - it's written by Kate Douglas Wiggin?! How did I not know that?? I've really loved several of her other books, so I'm SO confused about how I've never even read what is apparently her most famous! Quite glad I'm going to rectify that, and genuinely intrigued to see what parallels there are with Anne. 2mo
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Haha--my Kate Douglas Wiggin authorship revelation was the discovery that she wrote “The Birds' Christmas Carol,“ which I have a sweet old vintage copy of and INTEND to read every Christmas. (I'm not sure if I've actually read it yet.) (I haven't read Rebecca either.) 1mo
TheAromaofBooks Ah, The Birds' Christmas Carol - it's a classic tearjerker from the era 😂 But super sweet. 1mo
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Sace
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Miss Dearborn had not thought of it be-fore, but on reflection she believed the subjunctive mood was a "sad" one and "if" rather a sorry "part of speech."

#ChildrensClassicRead2024

tpixie I enjoyed this quote also!!! 4w
Sace @tpixie it's very astute. 4w
tpixie @Sace yes! 👍🏻 4w
42 likes3 comments
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Morr_Books
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Apparently, a long time ago, I started this on the Kindle, but I have no recollection of that, so I am starting over for #ChildrensClassicRead2024.
@TheBookHippie

TheBookHippie 🙃 2mo
43 likes1 comment
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LitsyEvents
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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repost for @TheBookHippie

#CHILDRENSCLASSICREAD2024 MAY

May, my birthday month! I have never read this. I am hoping for a good warm fuzzy cozy read.

Also a Shirley Temple Movie to look forward to! YAY.

Everyone welcome

2024 schedule https://bookhippie.com/index.php/2023/10/01/childrens-classic-read-2024/

original post:
https://www.litsy.com/web/post/2726662

#BuddyRead

tpixie Happy Birthday Month! 🎂🎂🎂 I hope it‘s been grand! @TheBookHippie (edited) 4w
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TheBookHippie
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I got a fun copy from the library. So far I‘m liking this …#CHILDRENSCLASSICREAD2024

Free http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/498

slategreyskies Oh, I haven‘t read this since I was a girl! I remember loving it back then. ♥️ 2mo
curiouserandcurioser @TheBookHippie i read this a long time ago-looking forward to a reread this month:) 2mo
Sace I have never read this book. I‘m enjoying it so far! 2mo
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TheBookHippie
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#CHILDRENSCLASSICREAD2024 MAY

May, my birthday month! I have never read this. I am hoping for a good warm fuzzy cozy read.

Also a Shirley Temple Movie to look forward to! YAY.

Everyone welcome

2024 schedule https://bookhippie.com/index.php/2023/10/01/childrens-classic-read-2024/

See All 25 Comments
mcctrish I am 99% certain I watched the movie on a Saturday morning a long long time ago but I have never read the book. Count me in. I am on the hunt for a copy 2mo
tpixie @TheBookHippie I remember loving this book as a child. I have no recollection what it was about though. Looking forward to reading it. 2mo
TheBookHippie @tpixie I‘ve zero knowledge of the story I‘m excited to read it! 2mo
SaceReads I‘ve never read this! I‘ll try to join in. 2mo
BarbaraJean Oh, wow—I‘ve never read this one, either, but I have it on the #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead list at the end of June… I may just have to read it early!! 2mo
TheBookHippie @BarbaraJean oh 😬 sorry bout that. I make and put out our schedule Oct 2023. I didn‘t catch you had it on your schedule. But please do read along. It‘s very low key we just post fun things we find and movies and articles with the hashtag. We all will have to join in your talks in June. 🙃 2mo
curiouserandcurioser @TheBookHippie I read this a long time ago and loved the Shirley Temple movie:) I'm excited for this❤ 2mo
BarbaraJean @TheBookHippie Oh, no worries!! I made up our schedule only a few months ago and wish I‘d thought to look at your schedule before I did. I may see if the Kindred Spirits readers want to move things around a bit… there‘s just a few of us and some are on your tag list as well 😊 @TheAromaofBooks @julieclair @rubyslippersreads 2mo
TheBookHippie @BarbaraJean 🙃🙃🙃🙃 2mo
AmyG Oh, how I love Shirley Temple movies. My childhood…they had them on Sat or Sun mornings and I always watched. 2mo
rubyslippersreads @AmyG Me too. My mom and I used to watch them together. 2mo
UwannaPublishme Woo hoo! This one is new to me too. I‘ve got the ebook on my Kindle and already ordered the Shirley Temple movie on ebay! 🙌🏻 2mo
AnnCrystal 🎉🎂🥳👍. 2mo
julieclair @BarbaraJean I'd be fine with moving the Kindred Spirits schedule around a bit so we could all read together. 2mo
TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean - I'm also fine with moving this one to May if it works better. I haven't read it in forever, so I'm looking forward to the reread whenever it happens 😂 2mo
PurpleyPumpkin Another children‘s classic that I haven‘t read! Looking forward to this. 😉 2mo
Bklover Not sure if I can fit this in this month, but I know I loved this as a child. Can‘t remember a single thing about it though! 2mo
rockpools I‘d love to join you for this. I grew up in a Sunnybrook (my grandparents place was called Sunnybrook) but somehow have never read it. Is it just a read-and-post-as-we-go, or is it a section a week or something? 1mo
TheBookHippie @rockpools read at your own pace, finish by end of the month, post a review or any quote you like or movie or fun info you find and use the hashtag #ChildrensClassicRead2024 ♥️ I read a little each day with my morning coffee. 1mo
rockpools @TheBookHippie Thank you ☺️. My library has provided me with a rather fragile copy from 1940! I‘m looking forward to it! 1mo
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TheKidUpstairs
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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#OnThisDay in 1856 American author and child welfare advocate Kate Douglas Wiggin was born. Best known for writing the children's classic Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Wiggin devoted much of her life to bettering the lives of children. She and her sister Nora established the first free Kindergarten program in San Francisco in 1878 and the first training school for Kindergarten teachers. #HistoryGetsLIT

51 likes2 comments
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wordslinger42
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The writing in this story is so pretty ?

"She was in time to hold Tom's hand through hours of pain; to show him for once the heart of a prim New England girl when it is ablaze with love and grief; to put her arms about him so that he could have a home to die in..."

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Q84
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Pickpick
TheAromaofBooks Oh I loved this one growing up!! It's due for a reread. 3y
TheSpineView 🤩📖📚 3y
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IndoorDame
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Pickpick

I spent the first quarter of this trying to decide if I‘d actually read this as a child, or if it‘s just uncannily similar to Anne of Green Gables. In the end I decided the later, though I suppose I could have seen part of a made for tv version of this one and gotten the title and a few key scenes stuck in my head... I got curious and looked it up, and it turns out the two were written and published within 5 years of each other.

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ravenlee
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Poor students, forbidden to read (or even browse) fiction! And they‘re so hungry for it.

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ravenlee
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Pickpick

It suffers by comparison to Anne of Green Gables, and certainly belongs in the same category with it and Pollyanna, but this is a pleasant read about a spirited and determined girl. I‘m curious as to sequels, because this story can‘t be done.

#3 for #middlegrademarch done.
@megnews @sblbooks

rubyslippersreads I haven‘t read it, but there‘s 4y
LinesUponAPage Love that book and the Shirley Temple movie version! 4y
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ravenlee
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Current read. Not really drawing me in yet, at page 50/208. So far it reads like a younger Anne of Green Gables, so much that every time Rebecca‘s black hair is mentioned I have to adjust my mental image. I‘m going to keep trying, as I‘m tired from a long week and coming off a cold and it might just be me.

Tamra Such great cover folk art though! Very eye appealing. 4y
TheAromaofBooks I was thinking that I had read this one recently, but actually was thinking of Understood Betsy! Now I am wondering if I have ever actually read Rebecca?? I'll be interested to hear your thoughts. 4y
27 likes2 comments
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BooksAtNight
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Mehso-so

Another childhood classic done! This reminded me so much of Anne of Green Gables (and I‘m not the first to draw the parallel). I did enjoy it and towards the end, the book differed enough from Anne that I could separate the two.

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GinEyre22
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Catching up on #fallintobooks : Day 18, sentimental

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aquanin
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Pickpick

I need more of Rebecca stories ans Mr A. Ladd!
.
#rebeccaofsunnybrookfarm

tpixie I like these covers! 4w
3 likes1 comment
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WeirdLibraryLady
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
Pickpick

Wonderful book for young girls!

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erzascarletbookgasm
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Can't find any books with cover that depict 'hot', 'sunny' or 'summer'...this is the most 'sunny' I can get.
#17rainbowbooks #asunnybook @jess.how

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MeganAnn
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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No shortage of books with #flowersoncovers here!
I have enough to make my own book garden 🌸💐🌺🌹#feistyfeb

EllieDottie That's a beautiful blanket!! 7y
MeganAnn @EllieDottie thank you! My grandmother made it for us for our wedding gift. 7y
56 likes2 comments
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Kmmsellers
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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I have lots of bookish memorabilia (I'm wearing a Ravenclaw sweatshirt now), but my favorite is my bookish tattoo. This pic was taken several years ago right after it was finished. The Latin translates, "I adore and implore thee to liberate me." The penny farthing, a symbol of the New Woman's freedom and mobility. #Riotgrams

JoeStalksBeck ❤❤❤❤ 7y
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MrBook
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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#TBRtemptation post! The library has received a new edition of this timeless children's classic! I haven't read this yet, but I've seen the Shirley Temple movie. 10-year old Rebecca visits small-town Maine and her prim aunts, bringing energy and charm with her. Think Pollyanna. This book received high praise from Jack London to Mark Twain. Wiggins' tale was considered bold for her day with such an exciting heroine. #blameLitsy #blameMrBook 😎

Kmmsellers I love this book! I wrote a chapter of my graduate thesis about it. 😊 Enjoy! 7y
MrBook Oooh! Graduate thesis. What was it on? 7y
JSW One of my childhood faves. 7y
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MeganAnn I loved this book as a child and read it so many times growing up!! ❤️👏🏻☀️ 7y
kspenmoll Read this as a child & watched Shirley Temple movie! Fond memories.😊 7y
MrBook @JSW 😎👏🏻🙌🏻!! @MeganAnn 😁👏🏻👏🏻!! @kspenmoll 😁👏🏻👏🏻!! 7y
BookBabe I want to read this and see the movie! 😃👍🏻 7y
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rubyslippersreads
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Shirley Temple made a career out of portraying literary #childprotagonists. 😄 #photoadaynov16

merelybookish Cool! I've always wanted to read Susannah of the Mounties! 8y
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LauraBeth
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm | Kate Douglas Wiggin
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Heard this today while standing in this spot: "My deddy always tol' me to follow a star and it'd set me in a straight line." Can a Southern author incorporate that line into their next book?

Leniverse 😆 8y
116 likes7 stack adds1 comment