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The Warmth of Other Suns
The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration | Isabel Wilkerson
One of The New York Times Book Reviews 10 Best Books of the YearIn this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prizewinning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties.Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an unrecognized immigration within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic.From the Hardcover edition.
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Bevita
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Pickpick

Amazing, unforgettable, awful, how come they didn‘t teach us ANY of this? She‘s a magnificent author, makes me like nonfiction. Couldn‘t put it down

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DMC_run8
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Pickpick

Very well researched book about the migration of African Americans from the south during the Jim Crow period. The book follows three people who make their way out of the south and end up in Chicago, NYC, and LA each in a different decade. 5⭐️

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BacklistReader
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Pickpick

This was a great one to pick up. We read this for my family book club and we all learned a ton. Definitely recommend this one.

Nonfiction that doesn‘t read like a text book is always a plus for me.

#nonfiction #thewarmthofothersuns #isabelwilkerson #bookreview

Leftcoastzen She‘s s wonderful writer .Such a great book! 4mo
BacklistReader @Leftcoastzen it really was good. I‘m looking forward to picking up more by her 4mo
Leftcoastzen Caste was great too! 4mo
BacklistReader @Leftcoastzen that‘s definitely good to know. 4mo
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BacklistReader
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January wrap up and currently reading

#wrapup #currentlyreading #januarywrapup

slategreyskies Just a quick note to let you know that I love your screen name! It makes me smile every time I see it. :) 5mo
paperwitchs These books look greattt 5mo
BacklistReader @paperwitchs they are really good. I highly recommend the mercy Thompson series by Patricia Briggs (it‘s my favorite). 5mo
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BacklistReader
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swynn
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Pickpick

(2010) This is the January pick for my RL book club, and y'all, it's f***ing brilliant. (Not sure I can say that at Book Club, but it's true.) It's the story of the "great migration" of black citizens from southern states northward during the early twentieth century and into the 1970's. It's an enlightening history interwoven with moving personal stories of three people who made the move. Fascinating, affecting, enthusiastically recommended.

Graywacke Agree, especially with your asterisk-ed comment. 6mo
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swynn
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The night clouds were closing in on the salt licks east of the oxbow lakes along the folds in the earth beyond the Yalobusha River.

#FirstLineFridays
@ShyBookOwl

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Butterfinger
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Pickpick

A strong sociological study of the Great Migration. Statistics and historical facts revolve around three figures who escaped the South in order to be free. To become American citizens. I'm so grateful to have read this book. #OtherSuns @megnews

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AnneCecilie
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Pickpick

This book thought me so much. I had no idea that there had been an internal migration in the US from the South to the North and the West starting during WWI and until the 60s.

Wilkerson chooses to focus on three people; Ida Mae Brandon Gladney leaving in 1937, George Swanson Starling leaving in 1945 and Robert Joseph Pershing Foster leaving in 1953. Each represents their own decade for leaving and their receiving city. I loved reading about

AnneCecilie their lives and expectations. I‘m so glad you organized this buddy read @megnews so I got to this book sooner rather than later. 6mo
megnews Thank you! Sorry I‘ve gotten behind here at the end. Still making slow progress. Defy plan to finish as it‘s excellent. 6mo
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Kdgordon88
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#BookReport.

I appreciated this book on the Great Migration and wished the facts presented were more common. I‘m so grateful for the continued opportunity to learn and then share these truths. 5 🌟 Seven Days was not bad 3.5 🌟

The Winterson‘s is a reread one story a day. In the Midst of Winter is kind of meh and I might bail but have less than 3 hours. Halfway through Nantucket and will finish The Twelve Fates today.

Cinfhen I‘m reading Warmth with my IRL bookclub later in 2022! I‘m looking forward- I bailed on the Allende when it first came out, i found it boring. 7mo
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megnews
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I saw a few reviews go up this week. I‘ve read a little but still behind. Still, I wanted to post for the rest of the group. Anymore new insights? What really stood out in this section?

Riveted_Reader_Melissa How are you doing, making any progress. I was behind forever and then when I got back into it I just went the rest of the way through. Maybe try switching to the audiobook or ebook depending on what you are using now. 7mo
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m in the Disillusionment section. I looked at 8 library systems and hoopla for the audio so I could listen on my trip and could not find one. I had already bought the ebook and didn‘t want to pay for the audio too right now. I‘m slowly making my way through. This is what happens to me with long books (even fiction) even when I love them. I seem to get bogged down in the length. I really hoped leading the discussion 👇🏻 7mo
megnews 👆🏻would motivate me but even though I really love the writing style and the stories, it happened again! I‘m going to keep pushing my way through but at this point I won‘t finish in time. It‘s also been difficult because my mom developed a blood clot after knee surgery and has now been emergency with bad nose bleeds from the blood thinners. My oldest daughter is having a rough time with her Bipolar. So I‘ve been sticking with mindless 👇🏻 7mo
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megnews 👆🏻Christmas stories mainly in audio. 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa I completely understand that, real life has been complicated for me lately too and I still haven‘t finished Vanguard from SheSaid yet. I‘m glad you are doing ok though, even with all the other stressors around at the moment. You‘ll get there when you get there, so just read what works for you at the moment. 7mo
Butterfinger Oh Megan, if there is anything I can do, just let me know. I just finished. 6mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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Pickpick

Worth five solid and fascinating stars. Wilkerson follows three people who leave the South and chase a brighter day. She tells about their dreams, many of which don‘t come to fruition the way the dreamer hoped. The migrants land in Chicago, NYC, and Los Angeles. So Wilkerson discusses life in all those areas during the turbulence of the 20th century. Highly recommend!

Full review https://www.TheBibliophage.com #thebibliophage2021 #OtherSuns

Prairiegirl_reading I loved the way this was set up. I honestly wasn‘t expecting it to be what it was. I loved it too! 7mo
Graywacke One of my favorite books. 7mo
Amiable Such a phenomenal read. 7mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage @Prairiegirl_reading I agree. So much heart in the midst of all the historical information. Lot of heartbreak also. 7mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Graywacke Yes! And she is an automatic buy author for me from now on. 7mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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I loved this nonfiction book that examines the Great migration from the South to the North and West of large swaths of African Americans starting in WWI. Wilkerson does a great job here of telling the larger story of terror, upheaval, change, and culture shock by interviewing and telling the personal stories of 3 migrants and their families…looking to escape racism and lynchings and get a new start in under warmer (and hopefully pleasanter) suns.

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Sorry @megnews I got on a roll and just finished it. #OtherSuns 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @TheAromaofBooks This was my #DoubleBookSpin from May 😳, but I finally read it 🤪 7mo
megnews It happens! I‘ve enjoyed the discussions. Glad you liked it. I really like your graphic. 7mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews Stock background images in Vanillapen, it seemed like the right one to pick to me. 😉 7mo
Tamra I keep meaning to read this one! 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Tamra I think you‘d really like it, she tells the larger history… but the majority of the book is the retelling of 3 peoples lives, in their own words….what they saw, why they left, what happened when they arrived, etc, etc. it makes it all the more personal and relatable. I found myself so grateful she was able to do intensive interviews with people from this generation before they are all gone. Their personal stories makes history come alive 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Tamra ↪️ and as she follows their lives and stories she gives the larger backdrop and history…making the connections that show why these stories are so important and typical of the time. 7mo
Tamra @Riveted_Reader_Melissa sounds fabulous! 7mo
Amiable Such a phenomenal book! 7mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! Great work getting this one checked off!!! 7mo
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megnews
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I have to apologize to everyone because as much as I enjoy this book when I‘m reading it, I just haven‘t picked it up much recently with other things grabbing my attention. I am woefully behind. I wanted to get the audio from my drive to NC Tuesday but can‘t find it. I‘m going to keep trying to read but I can‘t imagine staying on schedule. I still want to post for those who are keeping up. What have you learned? What would you like to share?

MallenNC I was really behind but finally caught up this week. I have read this before so I was definitely getting drawn toward other books. I am getting a lot from rereading because it‘s been a few years since I first read it. The section I just finished made me sad bc the “main characters” are getting older and it‘s hard not to think of the “what if‘s” of their lives had racism not changed their paths. Especially George. (edited) 7mo
MallenNC Also in this section was Dr. King‘s efforts to reform housing discrimination in Chicago. I didn‘t know much about it before this book. 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa I finally caught up tonight! But I very much understand your struggle….November was a tough reading month for me. So take your time and you‘ll get there when you get there @megnews 7mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa @MallenNC I found that really interesting too, I knew he had tried to start The Poor People campaign before he passed, basically uniting those living in poverty together…his children still do work on this front with his foundation. But reading this really made an impact of the Chicago atmosphere at the time. Have you seen the The Trial of the Chicago 6 movie or Judas and the Black Messiah both historical and set in Chicago overlapping the same⤵️ 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ time period and so very good at painting the corruption and racism in the officials of Chicago. I recommend them both if you haven‘t. (edited) 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @MallenNC The “what if‘s” kill me, especially with George, so much potential to basically a porter. So sad….then there is Robert at the other end… that struggled, but got too big and forgot to help others (at least to me). He could have done so much uplifting others. But he did get out, and got to live his Hollywood dream….so good for him….but I personally see wasted potential there too. 🤷‍♀️ 7mo
megnews @MallenNC @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I can‘t recall hearing about MLK‘s work in Chicago. Looking forward to reading that. I‘ve not seen those movies either. Will check it out. I definitely want to see how all three of their lives turn out. I will keep trying to get through. 7mo
Butterfinger @Riveted_Reader_Melissa @MallenNC @megnews the section on neighborhoods being emptied by white families hit me in the gut. It brought up guilt because I think my grandparents did that. I was way too young to know why they moved, but I remember remarks. Before this book, I really thought discrimination and segregation and Jim Crow was only in the south. It was everywhere. The New York bar, the housing in Chicago. The "receiving towns" still have division lines. Learned so much. 7mo
Butterfinger Excuse my errors. Intense emotions and trying to get all my thoughts down. I also was sad with George's what-ifs. He worked so hard to get to a place where his children could get an education. Children can make you so mad when they don't have your ambition. I really empathized with him on that score. And I hated Robert's pretentious party. What was he trying to prove? Especially to those in Monroe and to his nephew. Don't worry Megan. I feel like I stay behind. 7mo
megnews @Butterfinger after my maternal grandfather‘s mom died he grew up between Cleveland with his dad & NC with his dad‘s parents. Met my gran in Marion and they married in ‘47 and moved back to Cleveland, specifically the Hough neighborhood. My mom was born in ‘57 and the “neighborhood was changing.” Along with most other white families they moved by ‘62. The Hough riots took place in ‘66. I was in my 30s by the time I understand my grandparents 👇🏻 7mo
megnews 👆🏻were part of the “white flight” from the city to the suburbs. It sucks. 7mo
36 likes11 comments
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LitStephanie
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TBR for #wintergames2021 #teamgamesleighers
The pictured, plus The Stupidest Angel (re-read on audio), The Warmth of Other Suns (already started but twice as long as most books so I figure it counts), A Highlander's Christmas Kiss (couldn't resist a holiday bodice ripper), Merry and Bright (cheesy holiday romance), and Long Road to Mercy (recently started). Holiday beer to accompany. Let the games begin!

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megnews
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I can tell you this stuff still happens. My ex is Black and this happened to us the first time we bought a new car together, significantly different than my own personal previous experiences. He was so used to stuff like this but I was ticked. We left and, like Robert, I contacted the Manager & told him we could have drove off the lot with any car there but they lost that sale. Still get mad thinking about it. #othersuns

Jari-chan Unbelievable! 🤨 7mo
megnews @Jari-chan yep! We knew exactly what vehicle we wanted because we‘d done our research beforehand. At first, I thought he was just being a salesman showing us options, but when the options were all used and cheaper, I started getting heated. 7mo
DaveGreen7777 So sorry your Ex was treated that way! Racism sucks so bad! 😔 7mo
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megnews @DaveGreen7777 it does. I don‘t like complaining about this stuff on the internet especially when it‘s not me it impacts like it does someone else. But so many people think this doesn‘t happen anymore so I try to share a little. The sad part was how he seemed so resigned to it because he was so used to it. (edited) 7mo
DaveGreen7777 @megnews I understand what you mean. I remember reading a post from a white woman about a time when she playfully said “Race you to the car” to her black boyfriend, and when he got to the car, he asked her never to run in front of her like that again, because he was afraid of someone assuming he was chasing her. Again, what really haunted me reading that was how used to prejudice her boyfriend apparently was! ☹️ 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @DaveGreen7777 So sad, and even more sad he has a point and was correct. Too many would assume bad things, which could mean very bad outcomes for him. 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews These stories are so important because I think way too many people think this is in the past, and just cannot see all the racism still occurring around them. 7mo
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megnews
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Ida Mae, George, & Robert are finally settling in to their new homes. It‘s amazing to me how similar the reaction to Great Migration was to immigration. With previous generations, even from the same race & country, not necessarily welcoming new families in. What did you think? What were your thoughts on the advice provided by the Chicago Defender & Urban League? What else did you note in your reading this week?
#OtherSuns

Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m finding this whole book fascinating to read, but it‘s hard to just pick out 1 thing to talk about. She has done such a good job at making these stories of lives flow so well together. I loved that the doctor had finally made a place & practice for himself, I also love the very human quality of feeling in competition with his father-in-law and being able to provide as well…such a universal never-ending human issue. I loved the tidbits ⤵️ 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ about his “famous” patient. George and Inez keep pulling me back in too, all that work to escape, and he is ridding the rails permanently now, still couldn‘t get back to school. His descriptions of NY at that time remind me if parts of The Autobiography of Malcolm X, that scene of singers, dancers, gamblers, and artists must have been such an amazing time to live in, it always sounds half imaginary to me. Ida has the most down to earth life⤵️ 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ at least to me….worrying about children, neighbors, fitting in, again such human universal reactions….and I am so appreciative of the fact that she got to interview these people before they passed, so we get those details that make history more real, then just the facts history without personalization we usually get. I hope that makes sense. (edited) 7mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa I think the side stories that stick out to me this week are still Jesse Owens was JC Owens but misunderstood and got stuck with it, and I now want to read his autobiography….and the story of the organizer who had to basically hide out even after his job was taken from him, because he was the face of that job. Such a testament to organizing and says so much about how big organizations don‘t always understand what‘s going on on-the-ground. (edited) 7mo
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I agree with everything you‘ve said here. Definitely makes sense. I love the stories. It takes it from learning facts to seeing how it impacted actual people & families. I always feel what you‘re saying when I read about NYC in that time period. So magical. What was your take on the adjustment rules of the Defender & Urban League? Helpful or respectability politics? Seemed a little of both but leaning toward the latter. 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews Both, definitely respectability politics, but what choice did they have….they desperately wanted to be seen as equal and worthy of all the same justice, jobs, rights, everything….and the stereotypes that tried to “other” them were all based on making them seem “less than” based on illererate, lazy, immoral, what-have-you, so it was their way of both trying to educate & help the new comers to fit in, but also disprove the stereotypes. 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews Every new comers tries in some way to fit in by doing what the supposedly in “accepted” group is doing…whether it is new immigrants, moving to a new town and joining the PTA/church, or kids changing school, everyone wants to fit in and be accepted. I think it‘s just part of human nature to want to be accepted socially and not outcast. 7mo
Butterfinger I understand helping the newcomers adjust into fitting in their new environments, but I was glad that they kept part of their old selves. Especially with food. Ida Mae and Robert wanted to keep that small piece of themselves. I was surprised that Dean Martin's Riveria was so bigoted. In Davis's autobiography, Frank Sinatra wouldn't participate in a Vegas show or hotel if Sammy Davis Jr couldn't participate. I assumed Martin would have known that. Which is why Jimmy Gay thought it would be okay. 7mo
Butterfinger I know Davis helped to break down the walls in Vegas. I love the personal stories and how it ties with the larger historical picture. Ida May's first time voting without persecution. 7mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage This book is just so amazing. Like @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I am finding connections to many other books I‘ve read previously. Another from Harlem that comes to mind is Ralph Ellison‘s Invisible Man. And Whatever Happened to Interracial Love by Kathleen Collins. I am actually way ahead in our schedule so I put it down for a bit and that‘s making it hard to comment. 🤪 7mo
megnews @Butterfinger I love that they kept pieces of themselves too. 7mo
megnews @BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘m behind in responding and reading as my daughter came home from college this week. I‘ve had Invisible Man on my tbr forever. Really need to get to it. 7mo
Butterfinger I'm out of town with my girls for a week and I just realized I didn't pack my book. I only brought my Kindle. On the other hand, I will finish the Overbooked. 7mo
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AnneCecilie
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“Come help me,” Win said. “I can‘t blow this light out.”
George found him standing by the bulb. Win had been blowing on the bulb until he was almost out of breath.
“Win you can‘t blow it out, you got to turn it off,” George told him, reaching for the light switch and shaking his head.

#OtherSuns

(Sometimes it‘s easy to forget how new electricity actually is)

Texreader This is great! 7mo
megnews This is a perfect example of the general feeling Ida Mae seemed to live with, missing the wide open, the land, peace & quiet, etc. It‘s amazing how we don‘t realize what it was like to encounter new technology at a time the world was changing so quickly. 7mo
AnneCecilie @megnews It also reminded me of some scenes from Downton Abbey when they are talking about electricity and once they get it. And when they get the telephone. It‘s hard to believe that this is just 100 years ago. (edited) 7mo
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megnews
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Folks, I‘m behind again. My mom had a knee replacement last week and she‘s had some rough days. Been trying to help her and got behind on my reading. But here for those who are caught up is this week‘s #OtherSuns discussion post. What did you learn this week? What are your thoughts on arrival at their destinations? I will respond tomorrow when I finish.

MallenNC I hope your mom recovers well! I‘m a little behind too. 8mo
megnews I highlighted so much in this section that I don‘t know where to start. I learned some California history. Among the group that founded LA were 40 black people. CA considered prohibiting black people from living in the state. Northern classrooms where all the children were born in the South! I loved her discussion on migration in general and how it applied to the Great Migration, that contrary to the lie, Black people who moved from the South 👇🏻 7mo
megnews 👆🏻faced obstacles & were highly motivated to succeed. When I read this: “controlling the movements of Blacks by controlling the minds of whites,” I thought honestly there‘s still so many who think this way and try to control AA upward mobility. If only the recommendations of the Negro in Chicago report had been put in place everywhere: that white people would seek accurate information about Blacks as a basis for their judgements and that 👇🏻 7mo
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megnews 👆🏻press treat black and white stories with the same standards and proportion. Sadly these recommendations could still be made today. 7mo
Butterfinger Thinking of you and your mom. What stuck with me was the realty covenants to keep people separated. Oh my goodness. Which most definitely lead to projects and that kind of life. I know this is random, but since I was a little girl, I have been confused about this incident. My family was watching Good Times and the episode was about the family moving to Mississippi and how happy they were. I remember my daddy saying why would they want to come back? 7mo
Butterfinger I just never understood that comment so on some level my father subconsciously knew about the great migration or he would not have used the word 'back'. Is there something to this? Is there a sociology study about urban families trying to migrate back? That is where my brain went during this read. Also, I have to read Jesse Owens's autobiography. 7mo
megnews @Butterfinger from what the book said, it sounded like they were less likely to go back south than immigrants from other countries were to return to their homes. Regarding the realty covenants, I remember my great uncle in Columbia sc saying at dinner one night a group of neighbors was going to meet with a neighbor who was selling their house to Black people to convince him not to and I clearly remember him saying “why would they want to move 👇🏻 7mo
megnews 👆🏻into our neighborhood?” I wish I knew what happened in that situation. This was the mid to late 80s and I‘ve never forgotten this. 7mo
megnews @Butterfinger I am aware of families who‘ve sent a kid back down south with grandparents etc if they were starting to get in trouble up here. I think it‘s viewed as more rural and less likely to get in trouble. 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Butterfinger I don‘t know about that, but I read a great book about the selling covenants build in to real estate, some legally have to be passed down from buyer to buyer forever, they are tied to the houses‘s deed and take a bunch of lawyer work to get removed no matter what the current owner wants or thinks. Such a crazy thing to me. Sone of these things I read and half can‘t imagine how crazy humans are.🙄. And yes, I want to read Jesse (JC)⤵️ 7mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ Owens biography now too 7mo
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa it is crazy! That‘s a book on my tbr. Got to get to it! 7mo
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megnews
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By some miracle I‘m caught up! I think because the writing is so good and when you find the time it‘s easy to be swept away for awhile. In this section, Ida Mae, George, and Robert make their journey out of the South. Thoughts as you read? Stand out sections? #OtherSuns

megnews I find Robert‘s journey particularly interesting as when I‘ve thought of the Great Migration I‘ve always thought South to North, not so much West. It‘s interesting how different states, generally speaking, followed certain routes and ended up in certain places. I‘m outside of Cleveland Ohio and as the book mentioned, a lot of African Americans here came from Mississippi and Alabama. 8mo
megnews I also liked Robert‘s thoughts at his going away party in Georgia. “How can you stay here and accept crumbs?” he said. “Come go to heaven with me.” 8mo
MallenNC The part of this section where Robert is not allowed to rent a hotel even once he‘d left the south is so heartbreaking to me. I think Wilkerson‘s writing is moving. This information of narrative nonfiction is very compelling. I think it‘s my favorite genre. 8mo
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Butterfinger I haven't read the section yet, but I keep thinking of writers whose families were part of the Great Migration and it is reflected in their writing. James Baldwin and Maya Angelou. 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @MallenNC Yes, I found that particularly heart-wrenching. I think, even though he had the less scary leaving story overall…no one was trying to actively stop him from leaving… the stories all have the feeling of a slow moving horror story, can they escape, did they tell or not tell the right people, will they make it out…and his just grabs you because you think he‘s made it out, only to realize he hasn‘t. That horror movie where they think ⤵️ 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa They have escaped, only to realize they are still trapped. 8mo
MallenNC @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yes, exactly. I‘ve read this book before so I know (generally) what happens but I was still feeling anxious while reading bc of that sense of foreboding. 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Overall I found it very interesting how the lines of travel open to them determined the destination in many ways, the actual overground rail-lines and how they connected. I hadn‘t really thought of it in that way before, and it‘s so obvious. Plus the story about the whole train having to stop to change out the colored cars for the integrated cars at the border… it amazes me how much money/time companies wasted to maintain Jim Crow. 8mo
AnneCecilie What @Riveted_Reader_Melissa wrote, but what really caught my attention was Robert Joseph Pershing Foster who was driving to California and tried to get a hotel room in Western New Mexico only to find that Jim Crow still existed there. It appears we noticed the same thing @MallenNC (edited) 8mo
megnews @MallenNC @annececelie that part is heartbreaking. I want to shake my finger in their faces and tell them how awful they are. It‘s taken me a long road to read more nonfiction and I agree narrative is the best. It makes it so much easier for me to stay engaged. (edited) 8mo
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa it is crazy how all these companies subsidized Jim Crow for so long. I would have never thought of that, but your comparison to a horror story is perfect. 8mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage I was mostly struck by the incredible strength and courage the migrating people showed. They had some general idea of what they‘d encounter, but then it didn‘t turn out quite that way. Whether that meant the actual way they left or what happened on the road. 8mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I keep thinking about the adaptation, on HBO I think, of Lovecraft Country. It combines horror with this experience of traveling while black. Not strictly a migration story but it illustrates so many of the concepts Wilkerson talks about. The show is really good and I do want to go back and read the book now. (edited) 8mo
megnews @BarbaraTheBibliophage the strength and courage definitely. I have always thought that about immigrants who came from different lands with perhaps a dollar in their pocket and one distant relative here. To go somewhere far away that you‘ve heard about but never been, possibly never seeing your family again. The Great Migration was very similar and took no less courage. 8mo
Butterfinger Her writing is outstanding. I also noticed that I was gripping the edge of my seat @MallenNC and @Riveted_Reader_Melissa The analogy of the underground railroad to the overground railroad. So eye-opening to me. I learned about the Green Books from a picture book and it saddens me that travelers had to have a guide of friendly boarding houses and gas stations. 8mo
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megnews
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This happened so often to so many Black veterans. It burns me up. The descendants of these racist white perpetrators are the same people saying don‘t kneel during the anthem out of respect for the military which is absurd. #OtherSuns

KCofKaysville @megnews It's so sad. I have a copy of this and it's on my reading list. I'm going to listen to the author tonight who's talking at the college where I work. 8mo
AnneCecilie This broke my heart. I can‘t believe that this actually happened. 8mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage The more I read, the more upset I am with systemic racism and everyone who perpetrates it. To. This. Day. 8mo
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megnews @BarbaraTheBibliophage yes. If someone reads any history of the US at all it‘s impossible not to recognize the systemic nature of racism and how it still has its impacts today. The people were absolute monsters. Pure evil (edited) 8mo
megnews @AnneCecilie there are so many instances I‘ve read about this after both world wars. The case that stands out the most is WWII soldier Isaac Woodard who was beaten and permanently blinded. It‘s so disgraceful. 8mo
megnews @KCofKaysville it is very sad. This book is amazing. So well researched and well written. I have coworkers who had the pleasure of hearing her speak at a conference and they raved about her. I‘m sure you‘re in for a great experience. 8mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @megnews I‘m sorry to say that it‘s not past tense. People are still monsters to people they believe are below their caste, for whatever reason. 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa And this is still happening, there was just an incident not that long ago…https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/2021/04/13/caron-nazario-black-veterans/?outputType=amp 8mo
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa oh yes, I remember that story. It‘s an outrage. 8mo
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megnews
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Stand out quotes from last week‘s reading #OtherSuns

Leftcoastzen Such a great book! 8mo
megnews @Leftcoastzen it is! I find myself highlighting so much. 8mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage I'm listening to the audio and wish I could highlight passages easily! There are so many. 8mo
megnews @BarbaraTheBibliophage I have difficulty reading a nonfiction book on a topic I am passionate about because I want to highlight and refer back to so much. 8mo
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AnneCecilie
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The story of Bill Russell. NBA is not a thing in Norway, but this still gives you something to think about.

#OtherSuns

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megnews
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Dear #OtherSuns group, it‘s been a rainy🌧 week, I‘ve been purging ♻️ and organizing, and and my mind wanders every time I start to read 📕 anything. I‘m planning to finish this section this weekend in between watching my grandbaby trick or treat 🎃 and hitting Cedar Point 🎢 on closing day and then I‘ll answer and respond to comments.
How‘s everyone else‘s reading going? What did you learn this week?

MallenNC This has been a busy week for me too. I just finished this section today. One of the main things I thought about during it was Pershing and his brother. Both doctors, but who chose different paths— one staying in their hometown and the other taking a chance on California. 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m behind too and hoping to catch up over the weekend, so I‘ll stop back too. Now I‘m off to comment on last week‘s post 😂 8mo
Butterfinger My takeaway was how the caste system made the people of color at odds with one another. The pickers went to the citrus owners and said it's not us, it's them. Not knowing whether to stand for themselves because of fear or accept the pittance offered. And the same for the two brothers - is it betrayal to not want to stay and work for the place where you grew up? Is it wrong to stay and allow Jim Crow to run over you? 8mo
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megnews @MallenNC @Butterfinger @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Just finished this section. I‘m doing 2 quote posts of things that stood out to me. The think that always gets me so worked up is the treatment of black military personnel returning to the South after wars. The irony of people saying don‘t kneel for the anthem out of respect for the military is glaring in light of these incidents and burns me up. 8mo
megnews I‘m picking my mom up from her knee replacement and playing nurse so I‘ll be caught up for tomorrow. 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews Yes! Such a great comparison to make. Because the same people aghast at kneeling during the anthem, are some of the same people who looked the other way during this, and still won‘t pass an anti-lynching bill, and want to glorify as martyrs those in the military that stormed the capital. It‘s all what suits their argument at the time, and often the ways they twist logic to fit their narrative is mind-boggling…and I know we‘ve had this⤵️ 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ discussion about other topics in our other book club too. 🙄 8mo
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I can‘t take credit for the comparison. I recently saw someone say something similar regarding why people don‘t want CRT taught in school. I thought it made a lot of sense. Oh yes and the mental twisting to fit the argument is mind boggling. I‘m trying to figure out how people think a Democratic President who‘s been dead for over 50 years and his son are going to come back and put trump back in office. 🙄 8mo
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AnneCecilie
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One of the ways the South fought back the leaving of African Americans to the North.

#OtherSuns

megnews @AnneCecilie I meant to comment before. How could this even be legal??! 7mo
AnneCecilie @megnews I know, but if there‘s one thing I learn the more I read about the past,it is that anything is possible if that means that the people at the top stay there. 7mo
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AnneCecilie
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As a newspaper in Columbia, South Carolina, put this question to the ruling caste: “If you thought you might be lynched by mistake,” the paper asked, “would you remain in South Carolina?”

#OtherSuns

Cathythoughts Amazing picture 8mo
Texreader Dang! 8mo
BiblioLitten Powerful! 8mo
Butterfinger This quote hit me too. 8mo
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megnews
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Time for this week‘s #OtherSuns discussion. Ida, George, & Pershing are in the midst of the Great Depression. None have left the South yet. What similarities and differences have you seen in their lives so far? What have they endured so far that would bring them to a decision to join the Great Migration? What else stood out to you as you read?

MallenNC The first thing I thought about when reading this section was how glad I am that Isabel Wilkerson was able to speak to her three main subjects and get their life stories. That matters so much. This section‘s discussion of sharecropping and how it wasn‘t much of an improvement from slavery was really striking to me. The system was created to keep people from ever getting ahead. 8mo
megnews @mallennc I agree. In a history book there will be one sentence saying former slaves sharecroppers meaning the landowner gave them seeds, a cabin, food, and a little equipment and took part of the crops in payment. That‘s it. The reality was this was no different than slavery. Work for no pay. No way to ever get ahead. It is striking that despite the difference in educational levels or aspirations, the life was pretty much the same. The sections 8mo
megnews ⬆️on lynching were so disgusting. I believe it was George, who at the age of ten, was called by an uncle to cut down a man. I cannot fathom the level of trauma this causes. To know you are never safe. 8mo
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MallenNC @megnews Yes, it is disgusting and horrific. I follow the Equal Justice Initiative, Bryan Stevenson‘s organization, and almost every day they post about a terrible racial injustice. Their posts always say to overcome racial injustice we must confront our history. I thought about that in this section. 8mo
megnews @MallenNC exactly. People want to brush it under the rug that it was “so long ago.” The people she‘s interviewing are my grandparents‘ ages. 8mo
MallenNC @megnews Yes! George was about 3 years older than my grandfather. (edited) 8mo
megnews @MallenNC I agree about getting the stories down. Every once in a while I dip into the slave narratives collected by the Federal Writer‘s Project during the Depression. Someone should document these stories too. 8mo
rjsthumbelina @MallenNC I thought the same of the sharecropping. Didn't seem much different from slavery, other than no selling of family members. Really depressing 8mo
rjsthumbelina @megnews I was really struck by the idea that the man being tortured was less than 100 years ago. My grandparents were all alive during this. 8mo
megnews @rjsthumbelina yes. I can‘t remember if it was George or Pershing but the story about accidentally not stepping off the sidewalk churned my stomach. When I was a teen my grandfather once said he missed the good old days when Black people would step off the sidewalk. I asked him how would he feel if for no other reason than birth he had to step off the sidewalk for someone. First time I ever saw him speechless. When I married an African ⬇️ 8mo
megnews ⬆️American I thought he‘d disown me. But he surprised me by changing a lot over the years. Because of his comment, I‘ve made it my mission to be the one who moves out of someone else‘s way. I try to do this in general to be nice but it‘s a particular point with Black people. I can‘t make up for the people who had to step out of his way but I can lose a sense of entitlement and try to give the respect he did not for so long. 8mo
rjsthumbelina @megnews I love that story. How wonderful that he was able to change the way he saw the world 8mo
Butterfinger @rjsthumbelina @MallenNC I also noticed that sharecropping was an extension of slavery. My takeaway was how mad I got at George. Deceiving and marrying that poor girl out of spite for his father. That was cruel. 8mo
Butterfinger I have similar family stories @megnews 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yes, I‘m a week behind, but finally catching up! This section had such powerful personal stories, I‘m so glad and grateful she took the time to really tell these personal histories that add up to so much of the nations history (that we still want to bury/hide). So many of these were so heartbreaking, the tortures and lynchings…I keep thinking back to what she said in the beginning, along the lines of ‘sometimes the most aggressive thing you ⤵️ (edited) 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ can do is leave.” And so many people left, because whatever waited out there for them had to be better than where they were at. And as much as people treated them horribly, they still didn‘t want them to leave….they needed their, essentially free, labor. (edited) 8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews and we still can‘t get an anti-lynching bill passed through the US Congress… makes we weep for shame at that continuing denying of a huge history of basic human suffering. 8mo
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AnneCecilie
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That is one way of waking up. I‘m glad no one ever tried that with me

#OtherSuns

Cathythoughts Yikes 😳.. that‘s quite dramatic 8mo
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megnews
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Time for this week‘s #OtherSuns discussion. Impressions so far? What stood out this week?

If you haven‘t finished this week‘s section please feel free to chime in when you can. Let me know if I missed tagging you.

Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m really liking it so far, it‘s so good but yet the feel is very different from the last which is nice too. I like the story telling quality to it, like getting the stories from your elders that you didn‘t get when they were around. I like that living history quality of it. 8mo
TheBookHippie Oh this is so good. Enjoy. 8mo
MallenNC I loved this book the first time I read it and I‘m enjoying it just as much on rereading. I like how she personalized the Great Migration through the stories of three people. Ida Mae, in this first part, seems like such a cool lady. I love to see history through the stories of people who weren‘t famous or well known. (edited) 8mo
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MallenNC I also liked how Wilkerson alternated the narratives with chapters giving more context and history. She talks about caste a lot, which I didn‘t notice my first time reading. 8mo
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I enjoyed Caste and learned a lot but having previously read this just past where we are now, I knew I enjoyed this writing style even more. I was the one asking the older generations about their younger lives so I love this storytelling living history quality you mentioned. 8mo
megnews @MallenNC I read just past where we are now last time I tried to read this chunkster and it‘s funny I didn‘t notice all the mention of caste before, but now that I‘ve read Caste, I notice it popping up a lot here. 8mo
megnews I knew about the Great Migration, though it‘s just a brief mention in school. But one thing that I hadn‘t realized is that people had to leave in the dark of night and without telling anyone. (edited) 8mo
megnews Statistics I read over and over: 10% black pop. outside the South pre-Great Migration, 47% after. Wow! Also the Chicago statistic. 3% black pre-Great Migration. 33% after. More than the entire state of MS. WOW again! Meaning it should be more than the blip we learn in high school American history. (edited) 8mo
MallenNC @megnews I‘m not sure I ever heard of the Great Migration before reading this the first time. The number of people who moved and their impact on the country is huge, and definitely worth more study. And all the more amazing that, as she points out, it had no leader, just individual people and families deciding to make the journey. 8mo
AnneCecilie I didn‘t know anything about the Great Migration. We focus about other things for this time period in history in Norway. I love how Wilkerson is going to focus on three people through this book and Ida Mea like @MallenNC said seems like a cool lady. Like several others @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I noticed all the references to caste. 8mo
Butterfinger I noticed the word "caste" as well. So true, yet I cannot think of ever hearing segregation mentioned this way. There were some quotes I especially liked. "From Louisiana, he followed the hyphens in the road that blurred together toward a faraway place, bridging unrelated things as hyphens do." My stomach fell when the lynching was described as entertainment. It just made me sick. How can normal people enjoy torture? It's closer to me than when it happened during the Enlightenment and the Renaissance periods. 8mo
megnews @Butterfinger this has always been disgusting to me. They were complete sadists. People packed picnics and took their kids!!! Reprehensible!!! They made postcards of the events and people kept souvenirs. 8mo
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AnneCecilie
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AnneCecilie
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Someone is clearly missing the point

#OtherSuns

Amiable This is such a good book, isn‘t it? 8mo
AnneCecilie @Amiable totally agree with you. I read Caste earlier this year and it‘s one of my favorite books this year. So I have high expectations to this one too. (edited) 8mo
Amiable @AnneCecilie I read “Caste” last year and I think this one is even better! 8mo
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MallenNC
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Almost last minute catching up on this first week‘s section for the #OtherSuns buddy read. This is a reread for me but it‘s been so long since I read it that the stories seem new.

megnews She is such a gifted storyteller. 8mo
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AnneCecilie
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#WeeklyForecast

Continue Hood Feminism #SheSaid. I also want to start Emily‘s Quest as an e-book #KindredSpiritsBuddRead and the tagged book once I pick it up at the library tomorrow #OtherSuns

I started The Mermaid of Black Conch earlier today and hope to finish it today as well. Then I want to read Bewilderment, Maybe the Moon and The Daughter. I also hope to find the time to read the poetry collection Kumukanda in between.

Cinfhen I‘ve heard lots of great things about this one (edited) 9mo
Cinfhen Can‘t wait to hear your thoughts!!! 9mo
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AnneCecilie
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#WeeklyForecast

Continue Hood Feminism #SheSaid. I also want to start Emily‘s Quest as an e-book #KindredSpiritsBuddRead and the tagged book once I pick it up at the library tomorrow #OtherSuns

I started The Mermaid of Black Conch earlier today and hope to finish it today as well. Then I want to read Bewilderment, Maybe the Moon and The Daughter. I also hope to find the time to read the poetry collection Kumukanda in between.

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megnews
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Reminder: Grab your book for the #OtherSuns buddy read. All welcome! First discussion the evening of Friday October 15.

BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘ll probably miss a bunch of the early discussions. But should be able to catch up in November. 🤞🏻🤞🏻 9mo
megnews @BarbaraTheBibliophage sounds good. I‘ll keep you tagged. 9mo
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megnews
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Confession: I have a horrible time finishing long books or non fiction even when I like them. Doing #400Souls as a #buddyread really helped. So when that one ends, I‘m planning to continue on with Friday evening discussions on #OtherSuns. Thanks to @Librarybelle for use of the tag from our last attempt to read this exceptionally well written book. I‘ve tagged those who joined #400Souls but all are welcome! Let me know if you want to be tagged.

megnews Sections are about 50 pages each so we can read slowly but finish before the holidays. 9mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Looks great to me! I‘m in! 9mo
Hestapleton I‘m down for this! It‘s been on my TBR but intimidated by long long nonfiction. 9mo
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AnneCecilie I‘m in. Just ordered the book from the library 9mo
fredthemoose Oh, yay! I got maybe 20% of the way through this a couple of years ago and have been meaning to come back to it! 9mo
megnews @Hestapleton I am intimidated by anything 500+ and I don‘t read nonfiction much. I have a long list I want to read and I think I‘m going to have to do them by buddy read to get through. Glad you‘re joining in! 9mo
MallenNC I have read The Warmth of Other Suns and I loved it. I would definitely be up for reading it again bc it‘s been a while. 9mo
MallenNC @megnews @Hestapleton I am so hesitant about reading long books but this one went quickly for me once I started it. It doesn‘t feel like a long book! 9mo
Kdgordon88 I am in for this. Thanks Megan. 9mo
Butterfinger Yes, I want to join. 9mo
rjsthumbelina I'm in! 9mo
4thhouseontheleft I just discovered your buddy reads and would love to be tagged for future selections if you continue to do this! 7mo
megnews @4thhouseontheleft will do! I am hoping to do Stamped from the Beginning & An Indigenous People‘s History of the United States. I‘m looking at a couple others in the people‘s history series as well. I‘ll probably take a break while we do The 1619 Project because I really want to focus on it. 7mo
4thhouseontheleft @megnews I just read the Young Reader‘s edition of Indigenous Peoples‘ History, but want to read the original edition too! And Stamped from the Beginning is high on my list too! 🎉 I‘m hoping this lull in having some more free time and less unexpected events continues so I can pick up my reading pace again. 7mo
megnews @4thhouseontheleft I‘ve been trying to increase my nonfiction, particularly history & anti racism. In order to stay motivated, I asked about a buddy read & found some folks to read along. Not necessary but if you have any interest in co hosting either of those books in the future let me know. I‘ve also been considering African American and Latinx History of the United States, A Black Women‘s History of the United States, & One Person No Vote. 7mo
4thhouseontheleft @megnews I‘d be happy to co-host! Would you like to co-host with me on the #1619buddyread? Having a partner is always fun! 7mo
megnews @4thhouseontheleft I don‘t want to invite myself. If you would like help I‘d be more than happy to. My email is megnewson @ gmail if you want to contact me about it. 7mo
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megnews
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Nutmegnc I got it!!! 11mo
megnews @Nutmegnc great!! 11mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa I just grabbed this one too! 11mo
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa did you read this already? I want to buddy read this one too. Maybe after four hundred souls? I had started it once but couldn‘t make it through the length but the writing was sooo good 11mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews Nope, I have not! And yes, I‘d be up for that too! I‘ve had it on my longer to-read list forever, but recently moved it up after we read Caste with #SheSaid, her writing and nonfiction story telling was so good with that! 11mo
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Ellen_C
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Pickpick

This is a fantastic study of a phenomenon in US history that I never learned about — the Great Migration 1915-1970. Wilkerson does outstanding research and interviewed 1200 participants in this movement by Black Americans out of the South to cities in the North and West. https://cannonballread.com/2021/07/the-warmth-of-other-suns-the-epic-story-of-am...

SamAnne Loved this one. More than Caste actually. 11mo
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review
Addison_Reads
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Pickpick

#NonFiction2021 @Riveted_Reader_Melissa #BookSpinBingo @TheAromaofBooks

Another excellent, informative, and emotional read. I will carry these stories with me and recommend this book to every person I know. 💚

Riveted_Reader_Melissa This is on my to-read list too! I‘m hoping to get to it this month. 12mo
TheAromaofBooks Yay!! 12mo
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mcctrish
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Pickpick

I love Isabel Wilkerson‘s writing style!

Tamra This has been TBR for soooo long! 13mo
mcctrish @Tamra it‘s a big book but her writing makes it fly as you follow the stories 13mo
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Nute
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#MayCharacters - Migrates: The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America‘s Great Migration.
I tried to recall the moment, the year of High School when I learned that black folks in great numbers opted to better their lives and circumstances with a migratory movement to any lands above The South, going north and west, where perhaps the sun might rise in a different way that causes it‘s light to shine better and warmer on EVERY life.👇🏽

Nute I wanted to believe that my High School EDUCATION taught me this because it would be of value to know as a young brown hued girl that my ancestors determined way back then that a black life is a life, a priceless existence, a free individual, a created soul by God. That my people (like most people that choose to migrate from home to some other place) knew or at least hoped, that some place else had to be better than their current location.👇🏽 13mo
Nute I think that the title says it all.

Oh, back in High School...I might be wrong. Maybe that day I wasn‘t paying attention. Maybe there was some preoccupation. I can‘t see it like that so the conclusion: I did not learn about this in school. This big affirming moment in history. This empowering information came years later in my life because of the accessibility of books, and a diligent ongoing effort to be exposed to all voices and all stories.
(edited) 13mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yes, education, especially high school education, was very lacking in a lot of detail and nuance. I don‘t know if they thought we were too young to really emotionally understand so just heaped the supposed “facts” of things and nothing else or if it was all deliberate white washing, but the stories would have been much more powerful than just the events...and I feel bad for any nonreaders who never learn anymore and I think that limited ⤵️ 13mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ understanding, that is what every high school teaches, causes so many issues later. 13mo
Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks I agree with you... I must have been sick that day! Thank you for sharing ❤️❤️❤️ 13mo
Eggs Great post 👌🏼📚🥰 13mo
MicheleinPhilly So beautifully said, Ms. Kimberley. Yesterday my employer hosted a discussion with a documentary filmmaker whose film about the Tulsa massacre debuts on PBS on May 31. Over the course of the discussion, SO MANY employees, many of whom are highly educated, admitted that their introduction to that event only came about from watching “Watchmen.” It‘s shameful how these educational gaps persist. 13mo
TrishB In the U.K. it is the same regarding the teaching of the ‘British Empire‘. What good we did for so many in the world. I must have missed the lesson with the truth in it. 13mo
kspenmoll In the US public schools are run by school boards who often are empowered to approve curriculum, books etc. so minorities history often is whitewashed, with the bare minimum taught. But teachers in my district can choose non text books for student reading in classes so that is where more current diverse books sneak in. 13mo
LazyOwl I live in Australia and have learnt (by reading) so much more about the Stolen Generation and atrocities that the government perpetrated that should definitely be talked about and learnt in school. Sadly I was taught very little and the facts were glossed over in high school. 13mo
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mcctrish
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Happy Saturday Littens

Smrloomis Love the mug! What‘s the food next to it??? 14mo
Beatlefan129 I love Effin Birds! 14mo
mcctrish @Smrloomis it‘s my whole grain bakery‘s version of a pop tart ❤️❤️❤️ 14mo
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mcctrish @Beatlefan129 I KNOW!!! How Effin Bird mugs would be too many ? 14mo
Johanna414 THAT MUG!!!! 😍 14mo
mcctrish @Johanna414 it speaks the truth 🤣🤣🤣 14mo
dragondrool Another vote for the mug!
14mo
Smrloomis @mcctrish It looks delicious! 14mo
SamAnne Love that mug! 14mo
mcctrish @dragondrool I had to have it 14mo
mcctrish @SamAnne mugs have become very important to me during the pandemic 🤣 14mo
ncsufoxes I bought my sister & BIL a few Effin Birds mugs for Christmas & they loved them. 14mo
mcctrish @ncsufoxes I bought them for Christmas presents too 🎉 14mo
46 likes13 comments
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mcctrish
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I really wanted this as an audio book but my library doesn‘t seem to have it 😩 it‘s a bit of a tome but Isabel Wilkerson‘s story telling makes it fly

Sparklemn I 💙 a good tome! 😃 1y
mcctrish @Sparklemn this might be for you ( it‘s non-fiction that reads like fiction) 1y
Cathythoughts Yum ❤️ 1y
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kspenmoll
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#LLSS #litsylovespringswap

Thank you so so much @DanaManiac ! Perfect book choices! Love the bookmark, postcards, & the spicy aroma of the tea/coffee topper. Poe is pictured to the bottom left playing with it- he went so wild with it when I opened the box that he played with it so long I thought there must be catnip... haha who new he‘d love cinnamon, nutmeg, etc! I have great video of the scene!! Thanks so much for a wonderful box!!!

Bookgoil That coffee topper is so cute! What a lovely package! 1y
63 likes1 comment
review
SaraHasClass
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Pickpick

This is a well researched & written account of a little known & explored (beyond academics) topic of the Great Migration spanning American history (1915-1970). The exodus of mistreated blacks from the Jim Crow south changes the landscape of America, leads to mechanization of cotton farms, furthers civil rights & provides better & worse futures for the descendents of those who escaped the Southern caste system Epic, magnificent history.

SamAnne One of the best books I read last year. Hope to finish Caste next month. 1y
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Bethanyroe
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Pickpick

Don‘t even know where to start. This book was deeply moving. Wilkerson quotes former Pres Obama‘s words at inauguration: “we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the likes of tribe shall soon dissolve...as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself.” It‘s hard not to read those words & feel the sting of the ugliness of humanity that has revealed itself recently. But we can start w/ourselves.

SamAnne I loved this book. Looking forward to reading Caste next month. 1y
Bethanyroe What is Caste?? 1y
Bethanyroe I would love to know 😊 1y
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mmallek
Pickpick

Wonderful. So much information and perspective on the Great Migration at I hadn‘t learned. Every American should read it.

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ErinMiller
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Pickpick

"The Warmth of Other Suns" is a brilliantly written, thoroughly researched telling of what is perhaps one of the most under taught moments of America's history. Wilkerson's character development is incredible. I feel like I know George, Ida Mae and Dr. Foster personally. I learned so much and gained invaluable perspective and hopefully increased understanding. Pick this up for yourself and give a copy to a friend. Well worth the read.

Leftcoastzen So good! 1y
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review
Hooked_on_books
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Pickpick

Wilkerson‘s tour-de-force is a history of a major movement of people in the US as told through the in-depth stories of three such individuals across their lifetimes. Her extraordinary research (she interviewed over 1200 people!) shines through this tremendously readable narrative. It‘s the perfect read for #blackhistorymonth or, really, any month. It‘s just fantastic.

Amiable This was a 5-star read for me —so good! 1y
vivastory I can't wait to read both this one & Caste. Great review! 1y
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WhiskeyMistress
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Pickpick

This book should be required reading for everyone. An absolute masterpiece of non-fiction that manages to weave beautiful prose into the true stories it tells. An excellent read.
⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️🌟 out of 5 stars
Read date: 2/8/2021

Tamra I need to break down and purchase a paper copy of this because I definitely don‘t want a library due date. 1y
MallenNC This is a great book. I always hesitate with very long books but this one could have been even longer. 1y
PNWBookseller85 Just finished this and feel the same way! 1y
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SamAnne Loved this book. Just picked up Caste. (edited) 1y
WhiskeyMistress @Tamra definitely worth the purchase! 1y
WhiskeyMistress @BeckyMerilatt right? So much needs to be remembered about this era, and it‘s sad how soon people pretend to forget. 1y
Leftcoastzen So good! 1y
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