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The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales
The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales | Oliver Sacks
In his most extraordinary book, one of the great clinical writers of the twentieth century (The New York Times) recounts the case histories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders.Oliver Sackss The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; who are stricken with violent tics and grimaces or who shout involuntary obscenities; whose limbs have become alien; who have been dismissed as retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents. If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales remain, in Dr. Sackss splendid and sympathetic telling, deeply human. They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do. A great healer, Sacks never loses sight of medicines ultimate responsibility: the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject.
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jenniferw88
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#booked2020 @Cinfhen @BarbaraTheBibliophage @4thhouseontheleft

This is the first of 2 posts about books I'm thinking of using for the prompts. 3 #liveandlearn might change (it's already changed once!) I probably have books for prompts 5, 6, 7, 12 & 13 but going to go by my mood to fill these.

Just found prompt 8 - Not My Father's Son - Alan Cumming!

4thhouseontheleft Great selections! I will probably read at least 5 books for the #liveandlearn prompt! 😂 2w
BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘m so anxious to start planning—fun to see your starting picks! 😘 2w
Cinfhen Ohhhh!!! If I didn‘t already own 4 books that work for #2 I‘d use your pick 🎩clever choice!!! 2w
69 likes3 comments
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Jari-chan
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Mehso-so

Some cases Sacks tells us about were indeed interesting to read. I was surprised about what can happen out therr in the big world.

But as for me most parts of it were mostly irrelevant. A lot can change in 35 years time. For professionals and relatives/friends it is an important and sure as well helpful book.

10 likes1 stack add
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Jari-chan
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Mysterio being #mysterious 😱

#Fallisbooked

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Rissa1
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Mehso-so

Some of this stories were very interesting, some not so much, all were incredibly dated. Overall it was an ok read.

Picture of random price list found in the book.

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Rissa1
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My plans for this gloomy day. #rainydaysareforreading

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SaraGarland
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Pickpick

Once again, Oliver Sacks did not disappoint. The case studies themselves are quite fascinating, but his ability to write about complex medical issues without sounding too technical or too simplistic is what keeps me reading his books.

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gradcat
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#LilithJuly

(Day 9 - #TheHat)

*I thought this one would be too obvious; nevertheless, I love this cover...very amusing.

Cinfhen I‘ve seen so much praise for this book 💜 4mo
Leftcoastzen It‘s a great book ! Sacks makes psychological topics very readable. 4mo
Susannah That cover is perfect. 4mo
See All 9 Comments
KarenUK Love that cover 😍 4mo
LiterRohde Wow. I was not expecting that to be nonfiction. 🤯 4mo
JamieArc I‘m a sucker for Magritte references 😁 4mo
gradcat @Cinfhen I agree with @Leftcoastzen ... it is a great book—as are others he wrote—he is sorely missed! 4mo
gradcat @Susannah @KarenUK @JamieArc I wish I owned the edition with the Magritte reference on the cover. I own the book, only not with that cover—I agree, this cover is excellent! 4mo
gradcat @LiterRohde I know, right? But how about this title (tagged), and it is fiction. I love them both! 4mo
74 likes2 stack adds9 comments
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Kalalalatja
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I haven‘t read this, but it has been on my tbr for ages!

#TheHat #LillithJuly

Cinfhen @sisilia raved about this one 💘💘💘💘💘 4mo
KarenUK On mine for ages too....🤦‍♀️ 4mo
sisilia I love Oliver Sacks 💖 @Cinfhen I haven‘t read this one but loved his memoir 4mo
See All 6 Comments
kspenmoll Definitely read it! 4mo
ju.ca.no Oh it‘s on mine as well😂 4mo
Moray_Reads Mine too 🙄 4mo
76 likes3 stack adds6 comments
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Caffeinated_Reader
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#70 of my year. I‘m waiting for my Shadow & Bones trilogy to come in the mail tomorrow so decided to pick up this short book. Definitely looking forward to collecting more of his books🤓🥰

Caffeinated_Reader 4/5 ⭐️Crazy! It‘s amazing to read about all the excitement surrounding rare diagnosis from the 70s and 80s. It was mostly surprising the ages in which a lot of the disorders were onset. Very scary disorders. 4mo
6 likes1 stack add1 comment
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hefau
Mehso-so

I‘ve wanted to read this book for a while, but I was a bit underwhelmed. The stories of patients are fascinating. It seems that Sacks did care about uncovering the mechanisms of the brain; however, he‘s hopelessly full of himself. He goes on philosophical rants for pages and pages. I‘m interested in the patients and their afflictions, not how well-read or clever Sacks thinks he is.

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hefau
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I got my newest book haul today!

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speljamr
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Pickpick

I loved this volume of clinical stories and continue to find myself fascinated by the brain. Most of the chapters are well written prose and within reach of the non-technical reader. There were a couple though, maybe originally written for a different audience, that were a little tougher to get through.

#neurology

SoManyBooksNotEnoughTime i read this year's ago as a Psych major, great collection! 8mo
rwmg Have you read his memoirs? Such an interesting life. 8mo
speljamr @rwmg Not yet. I have a bunch of his books on my to read pile. I've read Hallucinations. 8mo
rwmg I've got A Leg To Stand On on my virtual TBR shelf 8mo
Abby2 I read everything of his. Fascinating. 8mo
123 likes8 stack adds5 comments
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speljamr
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Late night dinner: Sriracha chicken with purple rice and green beans.

(Yes, I know, this rice again. I love this stuff.)

#BookAndDinner

AndreaLove Yummy!! 9mo
Cathythoughts I think I would love that rice too 👍🏻 9mo
Velvetfur Purple rice?! I must find some! Looks fab, all of it👍 9mo
See All 6 Comments
LibrarianJen Yum! Also, that book title 💖💖💖 9mo
khusyaia Purple rice ? Im asian and i never heard about it. Lol 8mo
speljamr @khusyaia It also goes by the name black rice and forbidden rice. I believe it is Korean? 8mo
127 likes2 stack adds6 comments
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speljamr
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We continue with our Wednesday night dinner and a book. This week we have grilled chicken strips, parmesan garlic angel hair pasta, peas, and a Rosé hard cider. All with some background music from Tears Run Rings.

#BookNDinner

rwmg Love Oliver Sacks 10mo
ElizaMarie So ??? I‘m curious about this... do you just have dinner and read every Wednesday? I like this! 10mo
speljamr @ElizaMarie I'm a divorced single dad, and Wednesday night is one of my kid free nights. There hasn't been much to do lately, so I've just turned it into self care time with food and reading. 10mo
See All 8 Comments
Shemac77 Angry Orchard and Sacks!! 10mo
Reviewsbylola I used to read with meals all the time as a kid. I may have to implement that with my own kids. 10mo
ElizaMarie Well I‘m all about self care! Enjoy your dinner! 10mo
Honeybeebooks Love this book. It was a gift from our son. It may seem an odd choice but he got it right. 10mo
hollylynnbee I had to read this for school and fell in love with it. 9mo
139 likes2 stack adds8 comments
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ShannonColleen
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Excited for a new book and a warm bath 😍

Crazeedi Great book 12mo
ShannonColleen @Crazeedi it has been in my TBR pile for a while now! So excited to finally dive into it! 12mo
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jenniferw88
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Not all of these are #sillytitle(s), but they are pretty funny! #SisforSeptember @CaliforniaCay

IamIamIam I really enjoyed this, but it's not light reading by any means! I also have Awakenings to get to but too much neuroscience is hard on the layman!!! 🤣❤👌 14mo
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Regi_C
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Mehso-so

Note how it says "...and Other Clinical Tales" there in the title. This book definitely is technical, and it can easily go over your head if you don't have a base understanding of neuroscience. It's great if you feel like you want to challenge your understanding, but I don't recommend it as a light read.

#nonfiction #sciencewriting

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Oblomov26
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Pickpick

Well it is called a classic for a reason. The takeaway for me is that all we are exists in the grey matter between the ears, damage it and we can change or go away entirely. Damage which means a man can not recognise faces or even common items, which impacts memory so badly that thirty years of memory are lost, which means you can no longer recognise the concept of left, or providing ecstatic visions associated with mystics. Brilliant and profound

Vexingcircumstance At the same time, though, the brain can do amazing things. People sometimes heal completely from horrific looking brain injuries. Then there are disorders, like the one my daughter has, where babies are born missing parts of their brain & they are still able to learn to do the things usually controlled by the parts they are missing because new neural pathways form. Our brains are complex & it‘s not as simple as remove a part & we are no more. 1y
Oblomov26 @Vexingcircumstance no arguments on this- our brains have an amazing ability to recreate what is lost. But it is our brain, that amazing grey matter which recognises the damage and creates an alternative way to achieve a solution given the tools available. It is still resources available. This is where we are amazing; we can reroute the structure to create a solution. When Sacks was writing this we were only realising this malleability. 1y
Bronte_Chintz I loved this book! So through provoking! 1y
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ephemeralwaltz
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These are a couple of #borrowedbooks I have at the moment. I keep a strict log of which books I've lent and which books I've borrowed aaaaand since I trust my friends and they trust me, everything works out. ☺️

#MarchInBooks

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Gezemice
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Panpan

I am so angry right now. I can‘t take another word of this self-righteous, ignorant, judgmental narrative masquerading as compassion. I am close to the end but I can‘t bear to finish. I just want to fling my phone (I was taking the audiobook route) to the wall and scream, NO! NO! NO!!! These are people, not freaks, idiots, morons, retards!!!
This book is dated to the point of blood boiling. I can‘t recommend it to a 21st century reader.

Puredragonstar Uh oh.... I bought this on audio.... 2y
Puredragonstar Uh oh, I'm also going into psychology... Is he bashing people with mental conditions? 😡 2y
Gezemice @Puredragonstar Well, you could say he is the product of his time. And the beginning is rather interesting. There are many interesting stories. But for me it got all obliterated when I got to Part 4 and literally every sentence had multiple terms that are now derogatory. The narrator was very good, that made it worse. It made me physically ill. I literally was seething with anger. You might not get that reaction. 2y
Gezemice @Puredragonstar You could also just skip that section and then it is relatively good. But for me his way of looking at his patients in part 4 was inexcusable and put the rest of the book in that light, also. 2y
IllyallI I'm having trouble understanding the problem, is it just that he is using outdated medical terms that were the norm for his age or is he evidently being uncompassionate to his patients? 1y
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IamIamIam
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Mehso-so

Sacks does an excellent job of turning case notes into compelling narratives but this remains a very clinical book. It's important to remember that the first copyright is 1970, especially when you get into the chapter on "retardates" and the foremost authority who worked at the Institute of Defectology ?. I skimmed that chapter at best. You'll need a basic knowledge of psychology and some neuroscience for a clear understanding of many stories.

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taning
Pickpick

The brain is very interesting

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emilyhaldi
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heyitsMacall The brain is so crazy! I️ love this 2y
73 likes5 stack adds1 comment
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bookworm.krizia
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bookworm.krizia
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Mehso-so

As a therapist who studied and works with some of the people described in this book, all I can say is that I can relate. The stories were fascinating and sad at the same time. However, I really took a long time finishing the book. I feel like I was back in college reading journals. The book just couldn't hold my attention for long.

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arlenefinnigan
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Cinfhen Really want to read Oliver Sacks since @emilyhaldi posted about one of his books...which I‘m blanking on the title.... 2y
emilyhaldi I have a few Oliver Sacks books and have yet to read them! (Aside from Gratitude). I need to read your tagged book stat! @Cinfhen I think the book you‘re referring to is 2y
Cinfhen I think it might be the book written by his partner I was thinking of @emilyhaldi (edited) 2y
29 likes1 stack add3 comments
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Listener15
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Pickpick

A solid book but, for me, not overly fantastic. There were parts that were amazing but mostly just good. It really shines when he is writing about specific cases. It feels a little dated in parts and could use some defining of the medical terms for “idiot” and the such. The narrator, Johnathan Davis, did a wonderful job and reminded me at times of Scott Brick. Overall, decent book and worth picking up in a sale or at your library.

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mcknighteous
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"There are moments, and it is only a matter of five or six seconds, when you feel the presence of the eternal harmony... a terrible thing is the frightful clearness with which it manifests itself and the rapture with which it fills you. If this state were to last more than five seconds, the soul could not endure it and it would have to disappear."

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tricours
Mehso-so

Not as interesting as I thought it would be. I did like the parts about freakish mathematics skills and the idea of mathematics as music, and wouldn't mind reading more about that. It's fascinating what weird things can go wrong with people's minds, but I didn't really like the format of the book.

Minervasbutler Agree. Read it years ago and thought the best thing about it was the title ;) 2y
LauraJ You may want to try one of V S Ramachandran's books. He covers similar stories and I really like his writing. 2y
tricours @LauraJ thanks for the rec! 2y
Zelma I bailed on this one for the same reason. It just wasn't as compelling and readable as I excepted. 2y
23 likes4 comments
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m.galehuxley
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I just finished a fiction book that I really liked, and I'm having trouble getting into another fictional world. I want something really scary. But, until I find the right book, I'll turn to Oliver Sacks. He has never disappointed.

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Readerann
Pickpick

As always, interesting work from Oliver Sacks. I admire him most for his compassion with his patients, and I continuue to be sad he is no longer with us. My first book (already in progress) finished for #24in48 - at 3 hr, 13 min so far. I'm busy for the evening now, but tomorrow is devoted to reading!

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Readerann
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Ready to settle down with this for a bit. I'm on the chapter about a woman who constantly hears Irish music from her childhood in her head - fascinating stuff! Not burning up the pages for #24in48, but tomorrow should be better.

LauraBrook Oooh, that does sound interesting! I need to read more of his stuff, I like him. 2y
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m.galehuxley
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Stopped by a used English bookshop in Amsterdam. I'm loving this city.

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LWagoner
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Pickpick

Very compelling read- looked at case studies involving the brain & neurological illness. Dr.Sacks also ponders the role & existence of the soul in the person who struggles with these illnesses. Trigger Warning: the section, "The World of the Simple", focuses on the developmentally disabled.However, terms used to discuss & describe these persons are ones we no longer consider acceptable. I had to remember that this was first published in 1970.

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pocketmermaid
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Slow day at the academic library today. Covering the circ desk while the student worker is on lunch. Doing a bit of reading. #LitsyPartyofOne

40 likes3 stack adds
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bloomdailyblog
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"If a man has lost a leg or an eye, he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self—himself—he cannot know it, because he is no longer there to know it." - Oliver Sacks
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Reading a good book against a beautiful backdrop does wonders for the soul. This was taken in Zurich at one of my favorite parks (Lindenhof) during the fall. Where do you like to read?
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#Grateful #oliversacks #nonfiction #book #litsyfeature

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rabbitprincess
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No 5⭐️ books this month, and a couple of DNFs. The Sacks book gets my pick of the month because it inspired me to immediately request another of his books.
#aprilbookshowers day 30: best of April

luvamystery65 I just bought Snow Blind yesterday. Need to go look for your review. 3y
rabbitprincess @luvamystery65 Yay, I hope you like it! I should put a hold on the second book soon. 3y
23 likes2 comments
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rabbitprincess
Pickpick

These are some very interesting case studies. Some are frustratingly short, while others have extensive postscripts. The writing style is heavier than a more pop science kind of book, and some of the medical terms are dated in a cringey way, but if you're in the mood, there's much to ponder here.

JoeStalksBeck I listened to an interview with him not long before his death on RadioLab podcast . I cried . He was simply an amazing human 3y
rabbitprincess @JoeStalksBeck After finishing this one, I immediately went out and requested another of his books, 3y
20 likes2 comments
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rabbitprincess

The chapter on the president's speech is fascinating as an illustration of aphasia and agnosia, and how they change what people pick up on in speech.

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rabbitprincess
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#litsypartyofone means chips for breakfast 😜🎉
Got these at the local British import shop. Yum!

LaraReads Yes! I'm having cookies for breakfast! Loving this party! 3y
Dragon Great book , the brain is so interesting 📚 3y
rabbitprincess @LaraReads Ain't no party like a Litsy party! 😎 @Dragon It is! And it's amazing what we learn about the brain when parts stop working as they should. 3y
33 likes1 stack add3 comments
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EllieDottie
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For #true in just using non-fiction books! Here is a collection of some of my favs!! #lyricalapril

Cinfhen I've heard good things about all 4 books but I've yet to read any of them...hopefully one day! 3y
EllieDottie @Cinfhen they are all really good! I loved them all! 3y
65 likes2 comments
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redheadreads
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My last book for the #24in48 #readathon. I've heard a lot of great things about this book so I'm looking forward to diving into it! I'm very happy with my reading this weekend - I finished 3 books, continued progress in 2 books, and started 2 others! 😺 I wish every weekend could be like this! #catsoflitsy

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WatchMeMerp
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This was a book club pick that I was initially really excited about. However, it read too much like a clinical case study for me and I couldn't make myself finish it. #DNF #ReadJanuary #OliverSacks

BookBabe Crap, this is on my TBR 😳 3y
WatchMeMerp @BookBabe I know! I was really looking forward to it and then my brain just was not processing the format. The bits in between that weren't muddled with jargon were great but then it would become too much. *Le sigh* 3y
PomegranateMuse I hope you'll give it another try! It definitely is a set of case studies...Read it more like a book of short stories versus a beginning-to-end type of book. Looking up jargon, learning, discovering...Is half the fun. 😉📚 3y
11 likes3 comments
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Abby-J
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Oliver Sacks's work with patients suffering from neurological disorders and brain damage was #inspiring. His patient study and attempts to understand both the lives of his patients and the functions their unusual brains changed lives. #photoadaynov16

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jdtchicago

To be ourselves we must have ourselves – possess, if need be re-possess, our life-stories. We must “recollect” ourselves, recollect the inner drama, the narrative, of ourselves. A man needs such a narrative, a continuous inner narrative, to maintain his identity, his self.

JanuarieTimewalker13 This is a good book, I own it. Neurology is fascinating. I read many of the stories, but not all of them yet...funny, because I just chanced upon this one today when I was rearranging my books!! Book synchronicity..I love that! 3y
31 likes10 stack adds1 comment
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ampersunder
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Reading this, finally, after owning the book for years. Feels a bit like an artefact -- it's not scientific literature, not pop science, and not quite a elegant marrying of the two. The stories are fascinating, and I find myself wanting more personal history about the patients.

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forrestlaur
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Pickpick

Day 2 - most unusual...a fascinating look at clinical vignettes about Dr. Oliver Sack's neurology cases. #hauntedtales16

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jdtchicago

If a man has lost a leg or an eye, he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self—himself—he cannot know it, because he is no longer there to know it.

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