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Little House on the Prairie
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
208 posts | 422 read | 1 reading | 33 to read
The adventures continue for Laura Ingalls and her family as they leave their little house in the Big Woods of Wisconsin and set out for Kansas. They travel for many days in their covered wagon until they find the best spot to build their little house on the prairie. Soon they are planting and plowing, hunting wild ducks and turkeys, and gathering grass for their cows. Sometimes pioneer life is hard, but Laura and her folks are always busy and happy in their new little house.
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review
Roary47
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Mehso-so

3✨ A lot happened in this book so narrowing it down is not easy. Pa decided they needed to move, so they they packed all their things up and went into “Indian territory”. They had a lot of close calls in not getting seriously hurt, and a lot of other situations were terrifying! They are definitely tougher than I am.

review
melissajayne
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Pickpick

4⭐️ I really enjoyed it and the slower nature of reading it through a #readalong really helps to appreciate what was going at that time in American history. I have ancestors who lived in the Nebraska/Kansas area at around the same time period as the Ingalls family, but I believe they came a bit later. One of my many times great-grandma‘s was born in Nebraska. #2023 #fiction #childrenslit #middlegrade #littlehouse #bookreview #bookstagram

melissajayne I also have a bit of mixed feelings about the book. Excluding Mrs. Wilder‘s political views, which I disagree with, I can see how people would have an issue with how the Native Americans were portrayed in the book. It would certainly be an interesting book for a classroom discussion of the book in light of the history of the Native Americans by the US government at this time in history. 1mo
26 likes1 comment
review
julieclair
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Pickpick

I wish I had read this book as a child, when it would have seemed magical. As an adult, what I mainly felt was petrified, as the Ingalls family faced one peril after another. But the story is fascinating, despite the fact that I think Ma and Pa Ingalls made some unwise decisions that imperiled their family needlessly. ⬇️
#LittleHouse @megnews

julieclair Overall, what will stick with me from this book is the realization of how very perilous life was for the early pioneers, and also the pervasive prejudice against the Native Americans. 1mo
27 likes1 comment
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Tomorrow we begin On the Banks of Plum Creek!

Bookwormjillk My favorite scene was Christmas. Wilder writes these like magic. This book is a good example of the complexities of history. Thank you for hosting! (edited) 1mo
julieclair My favorite scene was Christmas, when Mr. Edwards risked his life to show up with gifts from Santa Claus. One scene that will stick with me was when they said goodbye to their family and set off on their journey, perhaps never to see them all again. But overall, what will stick with me from this book is the realization of how very perilous life was for the early pioneers, and also the pervasive prejudice against the Native Americans. 1mo
Ann_Reads @Bookwormjillk and @julieclair already summed up things quite eloquently. The Christmas chapter was an easy choice for my favorite. 1mo
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melissajayne The Christmas chapter was my favourite as well 1mo
sblbooks I agree with everyone else, the Christmas chapter is by far my favorite too. 1mo
staci.reads I loved the chaper at the beginning where Jack returns. I remember as a child being so sad when I thought he drowned and so thrilled when he returned. I also loved everything about them building their home. 1mo
mrp27 I enjoyed so much about this book, the wagon journey, building and making a home, how Laura felt so cozy and of course the Christmas chapter! It‘s been years since I‘ve read Plum Creek and I don‘t remember much I just hope we encounter less racism. 1mo
megnews Like others, my favorite scene is Christmas. 1mo
36 likes8 comments
review
IamIamIam
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Pickpick

We follow the Ingalls family on their way to settle on the Prairie and build their life. We encounter wolves, other settlers, the Osage nation, and disaster along the way!

review
BarbaraJean
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Pickpick

It‘s been fascinating reading the #LittleHouse series for the first time. I‘ve read so much controversy about whether these beloved but problematic children‘s classics should still be read/taught, given the colonialism and racism woven throughout the story. And boy, did this feel one-sided in its characterizations of the indigenous people, as well as the settlers‘ attitude of entitlement as they settled on land that wasn‘t theirs. ⤵️

BarbaraJean (Continued) But that‘s just it—it‘s one side of a story, it‘s biased, and it‘s a good representation of the usual attitude of those settlers—important to understand when it‘s not seen as the only side of the story. I‘d love to pair this with a story from the perspective of the people whose lands & way of life were being encroached on. I have mixed feelings & enjoyed the first 2 books more, but found the Ingalls‘ adventures (& perils!) fascinating. 1mo
JenniferP I read the whole series to my son and we loved them. They provide tons of opportunity for good discussion about the attitudes of the settlers towards the Indigenous people and what we could have done better. But they also show the value of family and hard work and show that you can be happy with much fewer possessions that we have these days. Great discussion books! 1mo
ImperfectCJ My kids and I loved the series and had some great conversations about their shortcomings. We also enjoyed this one for a different perspective on frontier life. 1mo
40 likes3 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Little House on the Prairie closes with the Ingalls family loading up their wagon and leaving their new home behind. Even though the next book is Plum Creek, we know they went back to the cabin in the big woods for a period of time. My immediate family always stayed in place and I often wondered (and still do at times) what it‘s like to strike out for parts unknown. Perhaps subconsciously this was part of my draw to these adventures.

Bookwormjillk I‘m looking forward to Plum Creek. It‘s one of my favorites. It‘s sad they won‘t get fresh vegetables but I did like Pa‘s comment about the happy rabbits. 1mo
julieclair I can only imagine how pleased Ma will be to be back in the big woods near her family. Like @Bookwormjillk , I enjoyed Pa‘s comment about the rabbits. I wonder whatever became of their plow? 1mo
Ann_Reads This is my favorite chapter as they are technically heading back to the big woods and leaving a place they never should have gone to. 1mo
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IamIamIam I know how the other folks feel about the land being taken over by settlers, but I wonder how many small settlements and cabins were left behind. 1mo
keys_on_fire I moved around a bit as a child due to my father‘s job. Sometimes it felt like just as you got used to a place and made friends it was time to leave. There was always a sense of excitement to accompany the sadness though! I‘m glad I had those experiences as I think it‘s made me more adaptable as an adult. My only regret is that I don‘t have those “life-long” friends that some people have who have stayed in one place. Plum creek, here we come! 1mo
megnews @IamIamIam I‘m curious too. I imagine some were used by newcomers when the land was finally open to settlers. 1mo
melissajayne @IamIamIam A lot were. 1mo
36 likes7 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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And so the Ingalls finally learn that Washington is not yet going to order the Natives off the land and they will be required to leave. Pa chooses to leave on his own rather than be forced out by soldiers. Ma laments the wasted year. But Pa brushes it off. Would you feel more like Ma or Pa?

Ann_Reads Initially I'd probably feel more like Ma in this instance. On the other hand, given all the perils the family went through during that year, maybe I'd be eager to find a better place to build a house. 1mo
julieclair I felt the same way as Ma did. All the work they went through, building the house, digging the well, planting the garden… just to walk away from it all and start with nothing again. But in truth, they never should have been poaching on the Native Americans‘ land to begin with. Even though the government said the land would be opening up for settlers, it wasn‘t open yet. They jumped the gun, and are paying the price. 1mo
mrp27 I feel a little bit of what they both felt. That was a lot of hard work and for what, but then life happens and you gotta roll with it. I agree they did jump the gun but settling on land that wasn‘t theirs to begin with. 1mo
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Vansa I find this an interesting way to end a children's book,though,no neat happy ending,but the requirement of a stoic acceptance that they tried an experiment,and it didn't work out,and it ends with them back in the covered wagon.As other commenters have said,they shouldn't have been occupying land that wasn't theirs.Interesting that Laura chooses not to portray a triumphant ending,but a melancholic one. 1mo
TheAromaofBooks While I appreciate Pa's upbeat attitude, I'm definitely with Ma on this one. I feel like she suffered the most - Pa's chores/half of the labor is close to the same as it was in the Big Woods, but hers is so much more difficult, living without any small luxuries. The constant fear of being a woman alone in a cabin with small children while your husband is gone during the day. Setting aside the racial aspect, she had to deal with strange men just ⬇ 1mo
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) showing up, demanding food and other items from her, constantly terrified that they might take more. To just blow off an entire year of constant stress and near-death experiences that were really only justified by the idea that you were building a better life and future for your family would be incredibly tough! 1mo
Bookwormjillk Did anyone else find this kind of sudden? I know it was a different time, but I can‘t imagine if my husband came home one day demanding we move because he decided it with the neighbor. I hope he had discussed it with Ma earlier and this was just Laura‘s perception of what happened. 1mo
Bookwormjillk @TheAromaofBooks yes, very stressful and kind of just tossed away. 1mo
BarbaraJean I‘m with @Ann_Reads and @julieclair—I‘d feel more like Ma. I have such a hard time with wasting anything, and leaving behind that garden they just planted (and all their hard work) actually stresses me out! Except for the fact that they shouldn‘t have settled there in the first place, so…😬 I think I‘d also be relieved to go somewhere I wasn‘t facing daily peril 😆 @Bookwormjillk I found it VERY sudden! 1mo
IamIamIam @Bookwormjillk I feel like this was so sudden just as a means to get the information in and move the story on. 1mo
IamIamIam I would absolutely not have been as gracious as Ma but I suppose she knew what she was getting into when she married Pa! 1mo
Bookwormjillk @IamIamIam haha I guess so!
1mo
megnews @Bookwormjillk very sudden. I wonder if Pa and Ma knew it was coming but through Laura‘s eyes, with no knowledge of that, it would have felt sudden. 1mo
julieclair @Bookwormjillk Yes, not only sudden, but also rash. What if Mr. Scott and Mr. Edwards had been misinformed? I couldn‘t believe Pa didn‘t verify that information before moving his family. 1mo
41 likes14 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Laura finally sees a papoose. She had a lot of big feelings about it.
I‘m curious where the Natives were headed. I‘m imagining changing camps for the season.

Bookwormjillk There were a lot of big feelings in this chapter in general. I wasn‘t sure what Ma and Pa were feeling at the end of the chapter. Both seemed deflated and didn‘t want to eat, but I didn‘t know why. Were they let down? Relieved? I‘m just not sure. 2mo
julieclair @Bookwormjillk I wondered the same thing. Why did Ma, especially, feel deflated? I would have thought she‘d be thrilled to see the Native Americans leaving. And Laura wanting Pa to get the baby for her. Huh? I know she was young, but I doubt she would ever have asked Pa to get her a white baby. It‘s like she thinks the baby was a doll, and not really human. 2mo
mrp27 I agree the part where Laura cries for a papoose made me feel odd and I didn‘t care for it. I too felt a little sad and deflated reading about the Native Americans leaving but I‘m sure not in the way Ma and Pa did. 2mo
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sblbooks Laura wanting the Indian baby kind of made me think about the book I just finished reading, The Attic Child. A boy from the Congo was sold to a British man, to be his companion. It's like they were just a curiosity. 2mo
Vansa This was quite harrowing to read,of all the people from the tribes leaving.Maybe Laura wanted to show that the sight is devastating,even to people like Ma who considered them subhuman?Easier to think of them as monstrous when you're not seeing the extent to which their existence was being uprooted. 2mo
BarbaraJean @Bookwormjillk @julieclair I wondered why Pa & Ma reacted that way, too. Maybe it was the after-effects of exhaustion & tension? They‘d been overwrought & anxious for days hearing the “war-cry”—maybe they only had the capacity to feel empty after all those sleepless, anxious nights. With Laura, she does act like the baby is just a doll. But there was also something about the baby looking at her—it‘s interesting she can‘t articulate what she means. 2mo
megnews @BarbaraJean @julieclair @Bookwormjillk @Vansa I‘m behind on responding but after reading the next chapter I‘m wondering if it had anything to do with the direction the Indians were heading. We‘re they not leaving but coming back to the closer spring/summer camp? Did the Ingalls take this to mean they weren‘t going to be run off by the govt and they themselves would have to leave? 1mo
julieclair @megnews I didn‘t get the impression the Native Americans were being forced to move. I just thought they were moving, as you say, to a different camp, as was their habit. But it is a little ambiguous. 1mo
45 likes8 comments
review
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Pickpick

Finished early. Classic children‘s literature that, despite its flaws, can still be used today to teach children history. #LittleHouse

blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams

What were your thoughts on today‘s chapter?

Ann_Reads I thought it was wise Pa explained to Mary and Laura about the 'talks' going on between the tribes. Still, the girls were so young, I could understand why Laura woke up screaming. That must have been frightening to experience. 2mo
BarbaraJean I had a hard time with this one. I agree with @Ann_Reads that it was nice to see the explanation from Pa. And I can imagine how frightening the experience would be for the whole family! But the descriptions were so dehumanizing and one-sided that it was really difficult to read. 2mo
Ann_Reads I agree with @BarbaraJean. It feels like this whole book has been difficult reading, with a few exceptions. 2mo
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julieclair I totally understand their fear, especially since we later learned that their lives really were in danger. Thank heaven for the cool head of the respected Osage chief warrior. But I did have difficulty with the language, particularly with the use of the word "savage". 2mo
Vansa As the other commenters have mentioned,this book was very difficult to read.I think it's very important for this to be annotated,and the real history explained,in the editions of the book,instead of leaving that to people to Google for themselves,which hasn't even been an option for most of the book's long publication history!It's important to see how opinions and perceptions were created through works like this(1/n) 2mo
Vansa (2/n)We tell ourselves stories to live,and so do nations-and this was one of the stories told in America,by people who could write history,and so is deeply simplistic.I wish the book would come with a fact-checking afterword or footnote,because as the paper I shared earlier mentioned,this was not how events panned out at all. 2mo
mrp27 Scary chapter for many reasons but was a hurtful chapter too. This whole book has been sad and heavy, not at all like I remembered. 2mo
megnews @Vansa I really like this suggestion and it makes me wonder if there are any editions that are annotated. I‘m going to see if I can find any. 1mo
25 likes8 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Me, looking around to see if the Ingalls have survived their latest catastrophe. Nature is amazing, how all the animals ran to the water. I appreciated Pa speaking up for the Indians after Mr Scott‘s harsh words.

Bookwormjillk And then they just say “All‘s well that ends well.” Not me. I‘d be freaking out and moving to Independence at once. 2mo
megnews @Bookwormjillk absolutely! Way too many very close scrapes with death if you ask me. How dangerous to take your young family there. (edited) 2mo
sblbooks In Farmer Boy, every chapter had food. In Little House on the Prairie, every chapter is surviving a disaster. @Bookwormjillk me too! @megnews I'm with you, I'm glad Pa stood up against Mr Scott. 2mo
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mrp27 Glad Pa spoke up and I too was fascinated by all the animals heading for water, even the snakes! I remember this episode of the tv show too but it was worse on tv. It‘s definitely been a year of calamities for the Ingall‘s. 2mo
julieclair This chapter was petrifying, and also fascinating. I, too, was pleased that Pa spoke up to Mr. Scott. I‘m wondering how/why Pa knew about the annual buffalo hunt, while his neighbors did not. Also, how did he know how to defend against the prairie fire? He must have done quite a bit of studying before they moved to the prairie. I found it interesting that Pa was remarking how good the burned land would be for their future crops.⬇️ 2mo
julieclair He must truly believe the government will make the Native Americans move west. 2mo
IamIamIam @julieclair I thought about how Pa knew about the hunt but he seems to be more willing to try and communicate with the Native Americans far more than the others. Clearly the Scotts are completely against them, but Edwards seems like he could come around. 2mo
38 likes7 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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While I do love the Ingalls, I‘d be lying to say I don‘t feel a bit of a vindicated thrill for the Native Americans that the squatters are hearing they won‘t be able to stay. The joy is short lived knowing this is still yet another treaty that will be broken.

Ann_Reads According to the book, the Ingalls leave asap. However, I wonder if some of the squatters refused to leave and if they were ultimately allowed to stay. As for the Ingalls family, I didn't particularly feel sorry for them, other than the children who had no say in the decisions. Ultimately I think they ended up in a better place after their move; closer to a town and other people anyway. (edited) 2mo
melissajayne @Ann_Reads and for Caroline. She really didn‘t like living so faraway from a town. 2mo
julieclair When Pa made the comment that the government had told him the land would soon be open for settlement, it made me think that he must have known they were squatting. Kind of disappointing, and maybe not too smart. Why go to all that effort to build a homestead, when you know you might not be able to stay? 2mo
mrp27 I was wondering too how many settlers stayed until the soldiers kicked them off and I wonder how well it was enforced. Pa didn‘t seem to think this one entirely through but I can say that with confidence knowing history. 2mo
sblbooks @julieclair Exactly! Not a smart move on Pa's part. @melissajayne I'm sure Ma is thrilled to be leaving! @megnews I just feel sad for the Native Americans because I know what's going to happen,this victory is short-lived. 2mo
42 likes5 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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I remembered the panther story but not how it started and I thought this was going to be like a Banshee. A panther! More danger! I loved how the Indian found a way to communicate with Pa to keep both their families safe.
Side note: I‘ve only ever heard that song as Peas Porridge Hot, not beans. What about you?

sblbooks Another chapter when things could have ended tragically. I'm glad Pa got away safely. Megan, I heard the way you did. I've never heard beans either. 2mo
BarbaraJean Same here - I'd never heard a beans version till this chapter! I remember it being spelled “pease“ but I can't remember why. Found this on Wikipedia! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pease_Porridge_Hot (I have to say, whether peas or beans, I don't think I'd like it hot OR cold. 😆) The panther was scary. I had a completely irrational fear of panthers when I was a kid. This chapter would have TERRIFIED me!! 2mo
IamIamIam Not gonna lie, I'm amazed at the amount of wild panthers Pa has come across!!! I didn't think they were so prevalent in the US! 2mo
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Vansa I didn't think panthers would attack humans, don't animals usually keep away from humans and only attack livestock and so on? 2mo
mrp27 I have such a hard time picturing panthers on the prairie, it seems so odd. Then again I live in a place where mountain lions are common sightings in urban neighborhoods. Wild. 2mo
TheAromaofBooks I did read that the screaming (versus yowling or roaring that you think of when you think “cougar noises haha) are usually made by the females in heat, so that could explain why this one was roaming outside of normal territory. Listening to some screaming panthers on YouTube was startling. They really do sound like someone being murdered! It's horrifying!! 2mo
megnews @BarbaraJean autocorrect put pease and I corrected it to peas 😂 I wouldn‘t like it hot or cold either. 2mo
megnews @TheAromaofBooks I listened too. Scary! 2mo
julieclair Another vote for pease! No beans. 🙂 And the panther thing scared me to death. I had no idea there were panthers in Kansas! I only think of them in Florida. 2mo
45 likes9 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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BEST. CHAPTER. EVER. Laura and Mary‘s anxiety about the many things keeping Santa from coming is such a reminder of Christmas Eves past. What an incredible neighbor Mr Edwards is!

Ann_Reads My favorite chapter so far and thankfully without mishap, although Mr Edwards could have froze in that weather. 2mo
Bookwormjillk The Christmas chapters are always the best. 2mo
TheAromaofBooks Mr. Edwards not only making the incredibly hazardous journey, but telling the girls such a delightful story about how he met Santa honestly had me choking up a bit. 2mo
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IamIamIam A really sweet chapter! I loved how shocked Laura was to get a shiny penny!! ❤️ 2mo
mrp27 Agreed! This chapter stands out the most in my memories of reading Little House. 2mo
julieclair Finally! The kind of chapter I was expecting! 😀 Mr. Edwards is my new hero. What a nice guy. 🎅 2mo
sblbooks This was a favorite of mine as well. I also loved this scene in the Little House TV series premiere! 2mo
37 likes7 comments
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Bookwormjillk
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Like the Ingalls family we‘ve had a winter filled with brown grass and cold rain. We finally got a bit of snow today, and we got to the Christmas chapter in the Little House chapter a day. I‘m feeling cozy!

bio_chem06 I started watching this series for the first time since I was a kid. My husband had never seen it, how do you get through life and never watch Little House on the Prairie?🤣 2mo
megnews How serendipitous! 2mo
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quote
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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While there were parts of this chapter I didn‘t care for, such as Ma‘s attitude toward the Native Americans, I appreciated Pa‘s interaction with the Native who came into their cabin, his attitude about the trail, and the discussion he and Laura had at the end of the chapter. I think this is the closest Wilder has gotten to questioning the history and imagine it was fairly progressive at the time she wrote the book.

Bookwormjillk I agree! 2mo
Vansa I really would prefer her not calling them wild and savage all the time, though!I can't begin to imagine what it must be like for a Native American child to read this book, and read about their ancestors being referred to constantly in fairly dehumanising terms,with even their languages being reduced to animalistic grunts. 2mo
mrp27 I agree too! I liked the counter points Pa brought. I must say though, the entitlement of the settlers blows my mind. I guess the thought was brought on by the government. 2mo
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Ann_Reads Some good observations have been made so far. I did wonder the last two times I read this if Mr Ingalls suspected the trail was used by Native Americans. If so, then why build the house so close to the trail? Also, I agree the settlers had an incredible sense of entitlement. Like they deserved the land and would put it to better use. 2mo
sblbooks The Indians didn't believe in owning land they were nomads following the herds. The white settlers did not understand this, and felt they entitled to move right in. The Native Americans were not treated right by the government or by the settlers for the most part. I was glad to hear Pa realize it was the Indians Trail and they were here first. I don't remember what happened with Ma that made her so prejudice. 2mo
BarbaraJean I agree—Laura‘s questions here (and earlier) make this feel a teeny bit more nuanced than I thought it would be. But as @mrp27 and @Ann_Reads have said, the sense of entitlement is incredible. To say “we got here first so we get first pick” right after saying the Indians had a right to the trail… it‘s amazing to see the self-contradiction!! And I‘m sure there were many others who wouldn‘t have thought the Indians had a right even to the trail. (edited) 2mo
IamIamIam Interesting views going on here. Pa seems relatively accepting of the natives at the beginning of the chapter. We see a noble native trying to connect and sharing a meal. We also see natives coming in and taking items from the house. Then we see Ma's feelings about the natives and what Pa sees as an opportunity from government propaganda about the natives. So much going on here and so many sides of human nature. 2mo
julieclair I wonder if Pa truly respects the Native Americans, or if he just realized that it was in his best interests to be friendly to them, until they can be relocated by the government… 2mo
35 likes8 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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A lot happened in this chapter but not the disaster we‘ve come to expect with Pa gone. Jack was so protective. That wind was crazy. I can‘t imagine what Pa went through to get home. Again, I would have been ready to give up. I could have done without Mrs Scott‘s racist comments. This is definitely another opportunity to discuss racism with young readers and also the govt‘s continual broken treaties with Native tribes.

Bookwormjillk Same with Mrs Scott. I laughed when Jack chased Mr Edwards up the log pile though. 2mo
TEArificbooks I taught in a three room school house on the Kansas prairie not to far from her homestead. And the wind got so strong that some days we couldn‘t open the school door and had to cancel school. There is also a joke - Why is it so windy in Kansas? Because Oklahoma sucks and Nebraska blows 2mo
TheAromaofBooks The Minnesota massacre was a pretty horrific event. Looking back, we can see how the Dakota were backed into a corner by the government and white settlers, but from the views of someone like Mrs. Scott, all she knows is that Indians who had previously been peaceful decided to kill hundreds of settlers. You can see how these dreadful back and forth vengeful killings made it a little difficult for anyone to see the perspective from the other side. (edited) 2mo
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mrp27 Again, this chapter hurt a bit. I do like that Laura questions. Feels in a way that Wilder used Laura‘s questions to counter the prejudices of the time. 2mo
keys_on_fire I haven‘t felt tense reading anything so far until this chapter. The descriptions of the wind and the desolation really felt creepy! Silence is so crucial to hearing warnings that the howling wind made me nervous for them! I like your observation @mrp27 2mo
Vansa The chapters are getting harder and harder to read.If Mrs.Scott hates the Indigenous people so much,maybe she shouldn't be colonising their land!Then she wouldn't have to see any!The dehumanising language used to describe nonwhite people isn't helping either-Dr.Tan's called "it" multiple times, something I notice she doesn't use when describing, say,the equally indistinct figure of Mrs.Scott.(1/2) 2mo
Vansa (2/2)Last of the Mohicans,written 100 years before,is far more respectful,so she can't really resort to the excuse of "it was the times". Constantly calling them wild,and having the dog be extra aggressive towards them is getting irritating- the dog should be aggressive towards any stranger!Maybe she's trying to show that no harm comes to them from the Indigenous people,but that's too much nuance for a children's book. 2mo
megnews @TEArificbooks a 3 room schoolhouse? Wow! That is a funny joke! 2mo
IamIamIam @keys_on_fire I completely agree with you!! In recent years, the wind has been blowing more forcefully and for longer periods of time and it always keeps me up! I would never make it on the prairie!!! Lol 2mo
43 likes9 comments
blurb
megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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As @Bookwormjillk commented on the last chapter, it‘s just one disaster after another. Today the chimney catches on fire and Laura saves the day. I was a little surprised Ma didn‘t make Mary and Carrie come out of the house. At this point I‘d be telling Pa I‘m ready to head back to civilization. Then, as a reminder of just how far away they are Ma wants to write a letter to family and says “If you mail a letter now, they can write this winter,👇🏻

megnews 👆🏻and then we can hear from them next spring.” I can‘t recall what happens next so I worry for the girls while Pa is gone to town for 4 days. 2mo
megnews The other thing I noticed in this chapter is Pa is still fretting about those borrowed nails. 2mo
Bookwormjillk Pa is really getting on my nerves. 2mo
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IamIamIam Holy cow, this really stressed me out!!! I thought the whole house was going to go right up!!! All I could thing l think of was that it was a good thing they did dig a well so they'd have water nearby. If they had to go to the creek for water, the house wood have burned down completely! 😮‍💨 And Ma told Laura not to cry!! Aww, cry it out, girlie! That's scary stuff and helping Mary AND Carrie!!! 2mo
mrp27 What I got out of this chapter was how much parenting has changed. After the adrenaline of a very scary moment Laura was told not to cry. So opposite of today where we are encouraged to let it all out. Where Pa is getting on peoples nerves Ma is getting on mine! (edited) 2mo
BarbaraJean I don't understand how Ma hasn't yet said that MAYBE this prairie life is not such a good idea. I was half expecting her to tell Pa to pack up so they could all MOVE to town...where chimneys don't catch fire and you don't have to hope the dog signals the doctor for you when you're all delirious with malaria. 🙄 @lamlamlam I'm with you, I thought the house was going to burn down! I couldn't understand how the entire roof didn't catch fire!! 2mo
julieclair Honest to goodness, I think this book should be named Peril on the Prairie! I, too, am worried about what might happen while Pa has gone to town. (edited) 2mo
megnews @julieclair what an apt renaming! 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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My apologies for late post from yesterday.
I honestly didn‘t recall this chapter. Despite knowing the outcome, I was truly terrified for the entire Ingalls family. I was worried sick for Mary when Laura was crawling to bring her water. Another stark reminder how isolated they were. How lucky the doctor and Mrs Scott happened along.

Bookwormjillk This chapter freaked me out. I don‘t remember this book feeling so dark before. It‘s really just one disaster after another. 2mo
sblbooks Jack was a hero, barking to get the doctor's attention as he went by. It's crazy that people thought the sickness was caused by too much watermelon. 2mo
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megnews @sblbooks Jack really was a hero. 2mo
IamIamIam This was scary! I thought it might be malaria at first because they were talking about the mosquitoes. 2mo
megnews @IamIamIam yes that was my guess too 2mo
Ann_Reads This really is a “what difficulty is going to happen next“ type of book. As some Littens have already said, I also didn't recall this story being so dark either. Other than a few bright spots, I'm rather surprised the whole family survived through this time period. 2mo
julieclair This is my first time reading this book, and I‘m amazed at all the scary things that take place. Not at all what I expected after hearing this book talked about all my life. I do wish I had read it as a child, when I would probably have viewed these incidents as exciting adventures, since they end well. Now, I just see them as dangerous and worrisome. 2mo
mrp27 Pa eating the watermelon was pretty funny! 2mo
BarbaraJean @Bookwormjillk @Ann_Reads @julieclair I feel the same way: it's one narrow escape after another. It's getting so I turn to the next chapter wondering what life-threatening disaster they will escape from today! I wonder if that's what stood out for Laura from her memories. The dramatic episodes would be more memorable than the everyday. It does make for an exciting narrative! @sblbooks I was fascinated that the community blamed the watermelons!! 2mo
Bookwormjillk @BarbaraJean I was thinking about it today. I first read this series as an adult about ten years ago and it didn‘t seem to have such a threatening aura. I wonder if the last few years makes everything feel more sinister. 2mo
Vansa I wish we could know more about Doctor Tan.What was his life like?She vaguely says he lived with the Indians?I would like more backstory, fascinating character.People who would know more of this period,how do we speculate he ended up there on the prairie? 2mo
megnews @Vansa possibly an enslaved person who had taken back his freedom and ended up with them 2mo
megnews @BarbaraJean it probably is what stood out to here rather than the mundane everyday. As @julieclair mentioned what I recall from childhood was exciting adventures not peril. Naivety of a child? Or realistic fear of an adult? Perhaps it comes down to perspective 2mo
megnews @Bookwormjillk your comment makes sense particularly in regard to the malaria. As a child the illnesses I knew were colds and flu and strep throat. People recovered. As an adult who‘s lived through a pandemic that scene was particularly frightening. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Yes there are other things we can discuss in this chapter, but can we pause for a minute to discuss Mary. Is she really this good hearted or is she being a goody two shoes? Baby Carrie doesn‘t even know what the beads are. Why does Ma frequently make them give up what little they have to share with Carrie and end up with nothing? And by today‘s standards can we say “choking hazard?!” I feel bad for saying it but I‘d want to slap Mary too.

keys_on_fire Yes! I thought it was super unfair to ask them to give up their beads after they spent all day looking for them! I also found it interesting how Laura did acknowledge that no one would have had enough beads to do anything significant, but why couldn‘t Mary and Laura share the necklace instead of putting it away until Carrie was old enough? Maybe Mary just knew that she wouldn‘t have enough and Laura wasn‘t old enough to realize it until afterward. 2mo
Ann_Reads Exactly what everyone said above: Mary verging on being a goody-two-shoes & (me) wondering why Ma would even consider giving Carrie something she'd probably break & maybe choke on. Mary/Laura could have made a full necklace together & shared it between them. I think Pa was trying to do a good thing by visiting the campsite. It satisfied Laura's curiosity & let them see aspects of another culture, with Pa's guidance. Ma never would have done that. (edited) 2mo
Ann_Reads Adding, I could never quite figure out what drove Mary's decisions. Perhaps she was seeking praise from Ma or maybe she would feel guilty otherwise. Laura always assumes Mary feels sweet inside but maybe Mary is just better at hiding her real feelings. Laura is a little younger in comparison and has a wee bit of a temper in reaction to things she doesn't think is fair or doesn't want to do. (Reminds me a bit of Marme and Jo in Little Women.) (edited) 2mo
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sblbooks Laura is like Pa, she has an adventurous side. Mary is like Ma, prim and proper. I thought Ma should have told the girls it was nice of them to offer the beads to Carrie, but that she was too young. Mary and Laura could have each made a bracelet. 2mo
Bookwormjillk Agree with you all. 2mo
julieclair I thought about the choking hazard too, lol! But I agree with everyone, I don‘t know why Ma didn‘t just let them both keep their beads. And Mary is on my nerves. 2mo
Vansa These sentences,to me,are why these books continue to resonate all these years later.So real,so human,who hasn't felt irritated/wanted to slap a better behaved sibling/cousin/friend?!! 2mo
mrp27 Yes, I don‘t understand Ma. This is not the first instance where the girls have had to give something up for Carrie. I believe in sharing and all that but what‘s the point when the person is too young to understand or too young to enjoy what‘s being shared? What‘s that teaching Carrie? Oh don‘t worry, I‘ll always make your sisters give some to you so don‘t have to work for yourself! 2mo
megnews @Ann_Reads I agree about Pa taking them to the camp. 2mo
megnews @julieclair I‘m glad I‘m not the only one annoyed with Mary!! 2mo
megnews @mrp27 these were my thoughts as well. I can‘t understand what she‘s trying to communicate here. 2mo
megnews @Vansa agreed. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Though there were probably many days that were the same one after another in the long stretch of prairie, this chapter is a reminder that on any given day adventure could happen. I‘d forgotten this chapter & find it interesting. Pa is always finding some different way to be resourceful. You have to wonder how much of this he actually knew anything about & how much he just winged it. He believed he could so he did. He really had to for his family.

keys_on_fire This chapter was a fun one for me! I love the cowboys (I dated a bull rider once!) and the imagery of the open skies at night. I love going tent camping in spaces away from the cities to see the sky in all its glory. I love Laura‘s energy and how adventurous she is. Definitely her father‘s daughter! 2mo
Bookwormjillk Was I the only one who laughed when the cow kicked Pa? 2mo
TheAromaofBooks I have milked unfriendly goats before, and that was bad enough 😂 Trying to milk a basically wild cow would definitely be difficult. And when they are stressed or upset, they don't let down their milk, so you really do have to get them to accept a calm, regular routine! 2mo
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julieclair This chapter was so interesting! And I‘m very glad they now have a cow. It hadn‘t really dawned on me that prior to this, there was no milk for the growing girls to drink. 2mo
BarbaraJean I loved the description of the cowboys singing at night! It is fascinating how many different things Pa does to take care of the family. Such an adventure! And Laura is here. for. it. 😂 @Bookwormjillk You‘re definitely not the only one who laughed. 😆 2mo
mrp27 I didn‘t think much of their diet until this chapter. How vital to have milk and beef! They certainly didn‘t have much in the way of fresh produce. It‘s a wonder they didn‘t get any illnesses. Overall, a fun chapter. 2mo
megnews @mrp27 good point. I‘m surprised Ma hasn‘t planted a garden yet. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Another scary chapter that could have turned out quite badly. A reminder how so many things they had to accomplish were risky. I was glad to see Ma finally stand up & tell Pa not to take the risk. Though I understand why he felt compelled to help I was left wondering again what on Earth Ma & the girls would do if it went bad. I continue to wonder if they had discussed this & had a plan or ignored the danger in hopes nothing bad would befall them.

keys_on_fire Another interesting thing to consider was what Mr Scott said about the wind and the sun. As often as I forget to grab sunscreen, at least I have that option. But that wouldn‘t be invented until the 1930‘s. Best you could do was wear a hat… 2mo
Bookwormjillk This book is a lot darker than I remembered! I'm already worried about what will happen when Pa goes to town. 2mo
julieclair I had no idea there might be dangerous gasses at the bottom of a well being dug. I continue to be amazed at the vast amount of knowledge and skill (not to mention strength and good health) these early pioneers had to have, just to survive. 2mo
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julieclair @Bookwormjillk I‘m worried about Pa‘s trip to town, too. And @keys_on_fire Yes! No sunscreen. Can you imagine how painful all that sunburn must be for Mr. Scott? 2mo
mrp27 I agree. I have no idea of the dangers that existed! Then again I‘m sure they could ever believe the dangers a cell phone with internet could bring! 2mo
GirlNamedJesse Thank you for coordinating this read-along! I haven‘t been able to keep up, unfortunately; could you remove me from your tag list? Thank you! 2mo
sblbooks @Bookwormjillk me too! With so many close calls already: almost drowning crossing the river , ma injuring her foot, wolves, carbon monoxide & quicksand in the well. What's next? @keys_on_fire that's a good point about the Sun. I'm a redhead so, I would have burnt to a crisp. 2mo
megnews @GirlNamedJesse done! 😊 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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The Native people the Ingalls encountered in today‘s chapter were the Osage. Ballerina Maria Tallchief was Osage (video: https://youtu.be/0y_tWR07F7Y). A brief intro on the Osage for kids: https://www.ducksters.com/history/native_americans/osage_nation.php. Pictured is current Osage Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear (https://www.osagenation-nsn.gov/who-we-are/biographies/executive/principal-chief-geoffrey-standing-bear).

Roary47 I like that in this chapter there is a reminder to the kids about listening to your parents. Jack could have been a problem in making a good impression with these Indians. By thinking about disobeying and not disobeying that is a lot more than children today will do. Parents don‘t just say things there is a reason they say them. This is a good note for kids that read this that might just gloss over it. 2mo
Vansa So this chapter did not make for very easy reading.I found this an interesting analysis of it. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://core.ac.uk/download... 2mo
mrp27 Agreed, this chapter was rough. Thanks for the article @Vansa 2mo
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Bookwormjillk Agree with you all- a rough chapter. @Vansa thanks for the article. 2mo
Ann_Reads Thank you Meg & Vansa for the links and information. Overall, this is an uncomfortable book to read. The story should not be held up as a moral example, even with Pa's & Laura's “more progressive“ opinions, at least in comparison to Ma's and other white settler's opinions. Having said that Laura is telling her truth, so one shouldn't harshly judge the book in retrospect, using today's moral compass. It puts the reader in a difficult position. 2mo
keys_on_fire I do not mean this to be insensitive to the bigger issues happening in this chapter, but did anyone else start singing Duran Duran when Pa said hungry like a wolf? 2mo
keys_on_fire I would also be more worried if we were not uncomfortable with what we are reading. I hope that learning from this will help make things different going forward 2mo
mrp27 @keys_on_fire 😂😂😂 hungry like a wolf! (edited) 2mo
TheAromaofBooks As a side note, I thought it was adorable that Ma puts her handprint in the cornbread and Pa says it doesn't need any other sweetening ❤ 2mo
julieclair Our discomfort with this chapter, which portrays the prevailing attitudes and prejudices of that time, is a perfect example of why books should not be banned. We can use this discomfort as a springboard for discussion with children - how does this chapter make us feel, how are the attitudes displayed similar to and different from attitudes today towards groups of people who are different from us, how would you have acted if you were Laura, etc. 2mo
megnews @TheAromaofBooks that was sweet 2mo
megnews @julieclair yes! As a child, I was taught manifest destiny. As an adult, I know better. What the schools teach today still hasn‘t caught up entirely in my opinion so I have used reading as a way to explore and question history and instill values with my kids. I hope it‘s made them more critical thinkers so when they approach propaganda or questionable policies they are able to see deeper and question. 2mo
megnews @vansa thank you so much for sharing the article. I had to remind myself during this chapter that the Ingalls had been bombarded with anti-Native propaganda by the US government due to its agenda. 2mo
Vansa @julieclair oh,no question about that.I would still say I love these books.Its possible for there to be great value in these books,in the attitudes on display as well, to explain how a country was created. 2mo
julieclair @megnews Critical thinking is such a valuable tool to teach children (and adults who may never have learned it). 2mo
julieclair @Vansa I, too, am loving this book. As @Ann_Reads points out, Laura is telling her truth, and there is value in that. 2mo
BarbaraJean @Vansa Thank you for sharing that link! I‘m grateful for the engagement with the text that everyone is doing. This chapter and so many other undertones in the book are rough going, but at the same time there‘s so much we can learn from engaging with the text, as @julieclair and @megnews have said, questioning the account we‘re presented with and examining the motives and context of its writing. 2mo
IamIamIam I agree with everyone here and recall that context is key. We're far removed from the attitudes of adult Laura's time and farther removed from her parents' attitudes. We're reading this through 3 separate lenses. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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“It would never do to lose or waste a nail.”
I don‘t know about you, but it seems every time we do a home project we pick up little items like this without even checking to see we already have tons at home. This reminded me in an even deeper way how different things are now. I‘m also curious everyone‘s opinion on why Laura would like to see a Native American baby so much.

BarbaraJean My guess is that Laura‘s fascination comes from a couple of things. First, that Pa mentioned (promised?) that she‘d see one. And second: she latched onto the idea so strongly because she‘s curious about seeing people who are different from her—especially a child. 2mo
keys_on_fire I think when your possessions are few, you know exactly what you have. I can confess to buying extra of something as well! I agree with what @BarbaraJean said, but I also wonder if it just had to do with a fascination with the word itself. Knowing they call their babies something different could be enough to want to know how else they might be different 2mo
julieclair Like @keys_on_fire , I think that Laura is fascinated by the word “papoose”. And I agree about the nails… we could all probably learn a valuable lesson from this chapter about taking stock of what we have before blithely buying more. 2mo
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mrp27 I agree with everyone about why Laura desperately wants to see a papoose but on the other hand why is she not as excited to see an Indian? One would think in order to see a papoose you need to see the mother/father with them. 2mo
melissajayne @julieclair when my mom‘s paternal grandparents came to BC, it was the middle of the Great Depression and they had very little money. They could afford some former barracks for sawmill workers to build a house and a chicken coop. My great-grandpa and his older sons had the job of pulling the building apart and my grandpa, only being 8 or 9 at the time, had the job to straighten out every single nail⬇️ (edited) 2mo
melissajayne @julieclair They didn‘t have enough money to get enough nails for what they wanted to build. 2mo
julieclair @melissajayne Wow, what a story. It makes you really admire the resourcefulness and determination of those older generations. Have you ever seen a photo of the house they built with those reclaimed materials? 2mo
melissajayne @julieclair I have, but it's not very good. 2mo
megnews @keys_on_fire great point. I think I was fascinated with the word as well. I was also fascinated with the word caboose. 2mo
megnews @melissajayne amazing! Thanks for sharing. 2mo
IamIamIam When Pa was talking about buying glass for windows, I realized that they hadn't purchased one thing since they set up camp and I'm not sure how long prior to that! Could you imagine going several months not buying anything?! 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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I skipped yesterday‘s post as the chapter was just an explanation about building the door. All we can say about that is thank heavens! Even though todays chapter is about building the fireplace I chose this picture because I think it‘s the epitome of differences between Laura and Mary. What were your thoughts as you read yesterday and today?

Bookwormjillk Yesterday‘s chapter reminded me of Almanzo building the sled. I couldn‘t follow except I was impressed Pa made nails. I‘m glad Laura gets to play in the creek every now and then. She is so different from Mary and worlds away from Almanzo‘s sisters. 2mo
sblbooks @Bookwormjillk I agree. Mary and Laura are polar opposites. I feel much safer. For them, now that they have a door and a proper fireplace to cook indoors. 2mo
Ann_Reads I'm glad explanations of how things were built ended up in the books, although I do zone out some while reading. It helps to form a mental picture in my mind. As for this chapter, Mary and Laura make a nice dichotomy. The stories might be boring if both girls were prim and proper, or even if both were outdoorsy. (edited) 2mo
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BarbaraJean I had to laugh at the contrast between Laura & Mary! This chapter had me thinking about differences between Pa Ingalls & Pa Wilder. Here, Pa invites the girls to come along so they can see the creek & play while he works. I feel like Almanzo would have been brought along solely to help haul stones. Some of that is gender roles, but Pa seems to make more time for letting the girls be children, while with Almanzo it seemed to always be about work. 2mo
BarbaraJean And @Bookwormjillk I‘m so glad I‘m not the only one who has trouble following the descriptions of how things are made! 😆 2mo
mrp27 I‘m amazed that as an adult reading the building and or work descriptions can be tedious and boring. But as a kid reading this I wasn‘t bored by it and read these books voraciously. I guess it‘s the magic of the author that kept me reading. (edited) 2mo
megnews @Ann_Reads I zone out at certain descriptive passages as well. 2mo
megnews @mrp27 I agree 100%. It‘s a totally different experience. Certain chapters im surprised I was so enthralled with the series. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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This chapter was terrifying. It could have gone so badly. What would Ma and the girls have done? Has Pa talked to her about what to do? What would they do without their horses if something happened? This shows me how much braver Ma and Pa were than me. I would be too afraid to make this journey without a group.

TheAromaofBooks I honestly found it hard to get my head around this. Fifty wolves!?!?! That's a LOT of wolves! How terrifying would that be?? I think it's really interesting how attuned the Ingalls are to what their animals are doing, taking cues from them as to whether there is danger around. 2mo
sblbooks Scary! They didn't even have a front door to keep the wolves out of the house. I can understand Pa not wanting to live in a big city, but this is too isolated with a wife and three small girls. 2mo
mrp27 This was nerve wracking! They are really made of sterner stuff than I am. As scary as it was, it must have been an amazing sight! 2mo
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Roary47 Oh man! When they got an actual door. I‘m having cold sweats just thinking about it. 2mo
BarbaraJean I just kept thinking how tough little Laura was! Waking up in the middle of the night to find out that their house was surrounded by wolves, and she gets up to watch them out the window. The window that‘s basically just a hole in the wall. 😱 She‘s scared, but she‘s also just fascinated—I‘d have been hiding under the covers or hiding my face on my mom‘s shoulder at her age!! I would not have been able to go back to sleep, that‘s for sure. 2mo
Vansa Something I liked though, was that Pa immediately picks her up so she can see the wolves- he's such a hands-on dad ( when he's not endangering their lives, that is!)Terrifying chapter. 2mo
IamIamIam @Vansa He lives off the land but he respects and admires out as well. Recall in the first book when he wasn't able to hunt because he was just watching the animals instead? I suppose you've got to know that when you appear skittish, you look like prey. I do love that Pa involves Laura in so many things! 2mo
IamIamIam I've always been afraid of the dark so a pack of wolves howling would just throw me over the edge!!! I was interested to find out Jack was a bulldog and searched to see how much differently they were bred in the 1800s! 2mo
Ann_Reads I noticed the Little House series was available to watch on Freevie. Just out of curiosity, I watched 10 minutes of the first episode and immediately noticed they did not use a bulldog in the TV version. So many things were changed for the TV version, I'd just forgotten how much. 2mo
julieclair They need a door. And windows or shutters. They need another gun, and Ma needs to learn how to shoot it if she doesn‘t already know. I just hate that when Pa is not with them, either he or they are left defenseless, depending on where the gun is. This chapter was terrifying. I do wish I had read this book as a child, when I would have found it magical. Now I just look at it from an adult point of view and just about everything they do worries me! 2mo
Vansa @IamIamIam yup, true. Very close to nature.Also in the first book he tells them that hunting baby animals in spring won't be sustainable! 2mo
Ann_Reads This was a scary chapter. Just a quilt and framed holes for windows between you and a giant pack of wolves. I couldn't imagine. Even Laura was more calm about it than I probably would have been. My adult perspective on this chapter is completely different. 2mo
BarbaraJean @julieclair Haha—yes to all of that!! 2mo
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BarkingMadRead
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks Love ❤️ 2mo
TheAromaofBooks Yay!! I've been enjoying rereading these so much. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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A couple things that stood out to me in this chapter. First, how long it would take for family to hear news of you. I always thought the same thing about immigrants from Europe in the old days and admired the willingness to strike out on your own knowing how cut off you‘d be from family. Second, I find Pa‘s proclamation that he‘ll always be content there a bit laughable. He seems like such a restless soul who will always want to be on the go.

Bookwormjillk Ya, I didn‘t believe Pa either 🤣 2mo
keys_on_fire What I wondered was how they got away with just starting to build there. I may do a little digging to find out what the process to stake a claim back when they would have been traveling the prairie. Just made me think of the land race scenes from the Far and Away movie… (edited) 2mo
megnews @keys_on_fire I got the impression because of what Ma said that they weren‘t even sure if the land was open to settlers yet. She said they didn‘t have word because DC was so far away. 2mo
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keys_on_fire I found this article by the Smithsonian that explains that they were actually illegally squatting on the land, and according to the list of places from the books on Wikipedia, the family actually went back to Wisconsin in between LHOTP & the Banks of Plum Creek books, which aligns with what this article addresses. I can't remember if this is addressed in the books so I guess we'll see.
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/little-house-prairie
2mo
mrp27 Yeah I found it fascinating that they felt they could just plop anywhere and build. Some interesting points made here about that. I never gave it much thought cause I know this is just one stop of several houses to come. 2mo
Ann_Reads I agree with @megnews that Mr. Ingalls won't be content for long in one place, so I do believe he told his wife a fib. 2mo
Ann_Reads @keys_on_fire Thanks for posting the link to the article. I always wondered why the family chose to move prior to being certain the land was available. That was risky but perhaps Mr. Ingalls thought the value of house and property in Wisconsin might decline when more free land became available elsewhere. 2mo
sblbooks I can't imagine being away from your family and friends months by post. Like others said, I don't believe Pa either. The only reason he stopped moving years later is because Ma said she wasn't going any further. 2mo
julieclair Thanks for sharing that interesting article, @keys_on_fire . Thinking of the Ingalls family as squatters puts a whole different spin on the story. 2mo
TheAromaofBooks Pa seems more like a doer than a planner 😂 2mo
IamIamIam I take it back when I said Pa wasn't being selfish... lol, seems he might have had his own priorities first! I keep wondering how long this entire process takes. How long do you think they've been away from Wisconsin and how long did it take Pa to get the house up? Really 2 or 3 days? Thanks for the article, @keys_on_fire!! 🥰 It's great to get a perspective on how the land ownership worked. I also learned what puncheon floors are! 2mo
megnews @IamIamIam I meant to look up puncheon floors and forgot. Going to do that now 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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All I can say for this chapter is: I CANNOT IMAGINE BUILDING MY OWN HOUSE!

Johanna414 I remember being so amazed by this as a kid! 2mo
Ann_Reads This chapter introduces Mr Edwards. Yay, though I get grossed out by the tobacco spitting. Of course, Laura is enthralled trying to spit farther than Mr Edwards, lol. 2mo
BarbaraJean Me too!!! When they left the Big Woods, I was struck by them leaving all the furniture behind “because they could just make more.” Same goes for the house, I guess! @Ann_Reads Since I‘ve only watched the TV series and haven‘t read the books before, I was especially excited to see Mr. Edwards and the singing of “Old Dan Tucker”! 2mo
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Bookwormjillk Wow, imagine the outcome if that log had just shifted just a bit. Happy to see Mr Edwards and Old Dan Tucker! 😃 (edited) 2mo
mrp27 Agreed, totally blows my mind to build your own house straight from the land. This fascinates me! (edited) 2mo
sblbooks I just rewatched the series premiere of Little House on the Prairie which was based on this book. I can't imagine how hard it would be to try to build a home back then. It's a good thing Mr Edwards was close enough to come help. 2mo
keys_on_fire I love the mention of all these songs, so I looked them up. There is an album available called The Arkansas Traveler: Music from The Little House on the Prairie. I found it on Amazon Music and all the songs mentioned in this chapter are on it!! https://music.amazon.com/albums/B073LNF4N6?ref=dm_sh_QTkEFxY6egX3M369rzVmHLltW 2mo
julieclair @keys_on_fire Love the link to the music. How fun! Thanks for sharing. 2mo
julieclair I was wondering how Pa could lift those logs by himself. Or even with Ma‘s help. Logs are so heavy! If Ma had been seriously injured, it would have been a real hardship. But if Pa had been injured, what on earth would they do? I‘m glad they now have a neighbor “only” two miles away. 2mo
IamIamIam @keys_on_fire That's awesome!!! Thanks for sharing!! 2mo
megnews @BarbaraJean yes, we forgot to mention about the furniture when we read the first chapter. It‘s so wild to think you‘d have to leave that behind. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Catch up post from yesterday. I noted a few things from this chapter. First, I recalled as a child how enthralled I was by gophers after reading this chapter! 😂 Second, Ma‘s being Ma making sure everything is clean, tidy, & just right even without a roof over their heads. Third, Ma‘s prejudice and the teachable moments this chapter provides. Why is Ma prejudice? What can young people learn about US history as they read this chapter? More👇🏻

megnews than ever I‘m convinced rather than banning these books, they are an important part of teaching these concepts. 2mo
TheAromaofBooks I thought it was interesting that Ma wouldn't give her reasons. Is it because she can't articulate them or because they aren't good reasons? On the other hand, atrocities were committed both by Native Americans and by settlers, so is it possible that Ma had family or friends who were killed and just doesn't want to get into all of that? 2mo
Bookwormjillk I agree with you that these books can be used to teach. However I was reading these aloud to my kids when they were about 5 and 7 and this chapter made me stop. I didn't think they were ready yet. (Maybe the 7 year old but not the 5 year old.)

It struck me in this chapter how much more free Laura was than Almanzo. Her parents seemed much more loving too.
2mo
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IamIamIam I was blown away by Ma IRONING in the middle of the prairie!!!! That was just so interesting!!! I was also curious as to why she wouldn't give her reasons but when Laura was writing this, attitudes had already changed about Native Americans so maybe she knew the reasons but was embarrassed about writing them in a book for children? Just spitballing, not defending their attitudes. 2mo
keys_on_fire When I read this, it made me pause to think about how often we automatically put fear in front when faced with something new. In addition, often times the introduction to something new is a negative circumstance. How can we best put aside our initial impressions in order to find the truth and not live in that fear? I think we'll find out more about Ma's feelings later on in the series, but as @thearomaofbooks mentioned and @bookwormjillk said... 2mo
keys_on_fire maybe what happened to Ma isn't something she would want to frighten her children with at their ages in this scene. Hmmmm
So glad we're doing this in order to reflect and not go with face value even in the reading!! :)
2mo
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks @IamIamIam I‘ve heard that a good way to respond to racist or sexist jokes and comments is to ask the person to explain why they feel or think that way, or why the “joke” is funny. It‘s interesting to see Laura asking the same question out of honest curiosity. And super interesting that Ma doesn‘t explain. I agree that she may have trauma about atrocities, and/or thinks it‘s a too-adult topic as @keys_on_fire said. Or ⤵️ (edited) 2mo
BarbaraJean (Continued) …Ma honestly may not know why, and may have not taken time to think about it. It might be an attitude she‘s absorbed from her family/the culture she‘s part of. @IamIamIam I felt the same way about Ma ironing!! Such a huge cultural difference from today. (edited) 2mo
TEArificbooks I definitely enjoyed the descriptions of the prairie in this chapter. The vastness, the beauty, the plentiful game. I grew up in Kansas and miss those things. If anyone wants to see it, there are you tube videos of a place called Konza prairie, it is the worlds only tall grass prairie reserve. It is the landscape she saw. 2mo
TEArificbooks I was also upset with pa in this chapter for leaving them alone! There were so many ways to die in the west, what if a rattler got one of the girls? Or Pa was hurt and couldn‘t get back to them? That is why so many people went in wagon trains so they could help each other. 2mo
mrp27 My mind was blown that Ma ironed. In the middle of the prairie. With no one around for miles. 2mo
mrp27 Big Woods and Farmer boy went by pretty good without too much in terms of racism but here, we are getting to the meat of the problem so to speak and it‘s making me uncomfortable. As an adult I‘m starting to see it and it hurts that it‘s coming from such a beloved book. It won‘t stop me from reading and it won‘t prevent me from recommending it. It does thrill me to see Laura challenge her mother and there lies the teachable moment. (edited) 2mo
sblbooks I would have liked ma to explain her reasons why she didn't like Native Americans. I don't think it was common for parents and children that discuss such things back then. It seems like kids were just told what to believe, and expected to follow suit. 2mo
julieclair I‘m wondering if Ma doesn‘t like Native Americans simply because she‘s never known any and is afraid of people who are culturally very different from her. I‘m hoping she gets to know some Native Americans as the book progresses, and changes her opinion of them as a result. And I agree that books like this can be used as a valuable teaching tool and basis for discussion. They should not be banned. 2mo
megnews @julieclair @BarbaraJean I think your guesses about Ma‘s prejudice are probably accurate. She probably absorbed these attitudes from her family/culture and likely it is fear of the unknown for both her and those she absorbed the attitude from. It‘s likely news of violence committed by Natives was reported very one sided and and not as a reaction to encroachment on their land and violence committed against them. Those instances were probably 👇🏻 2mo
megnews used to uphold racist attitudes for the benefit of the culture and westward expansion goals. 2mo
megnews @TEArificbooks thank you for the recommendation of the YouTube video. I will check it out. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Many of us had very strong opinions yesterday about Pa taking the family alone on such a dangerous venture. I think I would have been frozen in fear. I didn‘t panic about Jack though because I knew he made a comeback. I‘m so glad Pa didn‘t shoot him. That would have been even worse. What did everyone think of this chapter? Can Pa do anything to redeem himself?

julieclair Can you imagine if Pa had actually shot him? After Laura had pointed him out? My goodness gracious! Believe it or not (and I can hardly believe it myself) this is my first time reading this book. I'm loving it so far! And I think that Pa can definitely redeem himself. He is a good man at heart and obviously loves his family. As in all families, people make bad decisions from time to time. But by today's standards, this move West was a whopper! 2mo
Bookwormjillk This is a re-read for me too. My feelings towards Pa and what my modern brain sees as selfishness only grow stronger! 2mo
BarbaraJean @julieclair This is my first time reading this, too! I kept waiting for Jack to show up in the last chapter. When he didn‘t I figured he was gone—so this chapter was a surprise to me! I can‘t even imagine if Pa had shot him 🤦🏻‍♀️ I don‘t even think Pa needs to redeem himself; although I think this move is an unnecessary danger for his family, I don‘t fault him for it. There‘s a lot about the circumstances of the time I know I can‘t understand. 2mo
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mrp27 I remembered Jack came back so I wasn‘t too worried. I also don‘t view Pa as being selfish at all. This was life back then. In our present time we can look back and see all the danger but to them it was just living. 2mo
julieclair @BarbaraJean Me too! I was sure he was going to show up in the last chapter. And I'm glad I'm not the only first-timer in the group. 😃 2mo
sblbooks I second what @mrp27 said. 2mo
Vansa I think Pa is extremely lucky to have such a long suffering family! 2mo
Ann_Reads I was just glad Jack survived. They could have put him in the wagon though. It seems each time I reread this book, I question more of the decisions made by the adults. 2mo
IamIamIam (1) Really glad that Jack made it back!!! I don't remember the series as well as I thought I did! 😆 I haven't seen Pa's actions as selfish as much as everyone else. The thing that strikes me most is how much the family lives off the land but aren't farmers. It's true that once an area gets settled, many wild animals will find more seclusion and for Pa to have to go out for longer trips to find food would be more.... 2mo
IamIamIam (2) dangerous for Ma with the girls. I think the trip is exceedingly harsh but the reasons do make sense. They didn't have the luxury of stores of crops like the Wilders and slaughtering animals as they come gets dicey if there aren't any in the area. It's absolutely not a choice I'd want to make but I see Pa's reasoning. I might be alone in that and that's okay. ❤️ 2mo
megnews @julieclair great answer and I‘m glad you‘re enjoying the book! 2mo
megnews @Bookwormjillk I can‘t help but wonder if there is more to the reasons for moving that Laura never knew as a child or find out as an adult. Or is it just what people did then? It feels so dangerous to us but probably like a normal Tuesday to them. 2mo
BarbaraJean @julieclair I am glad to have a first-timer buddy, too! 😊 2mo
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Susanita
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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There was a stretch when I would read the whole series and then start all over again. #sundayfunday

CocoReads These books for sure, the boxcar children, I was a horse crazy city kid-so anything to do with horses, ranching, farming. 2mo
she.hearts.horror Christopher Pike books, Nancy Drew, Sweet Valley High, Lois Duncan books, R.L. Stein, Wayside School is Falling Down, and Misses Pigglewiggle 😂 2mo
Jerdencon Judy Blume books 2mo
ozma.of.oz I loved the Little House on the Prairie books! Thanks for sharing! 2mo
Bklover I did the same thing- but I‘d always skip Farmer Boy! 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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I just don‘t think I‘m made of the tough stuff Ma is. I just don‘t think this life would be for me. I don‘t think I realized how much danger they were in when I read this as a child. It seemed like a great adventure. As a parent, I realize the risks they took at every turn. What were your thoughts as you read this chapter?

TheQuietQuill The best word for me to sum up this chapter was “terrifying.” I can‘t even imagine what Ma and Pa were feeling in this moment, and the fear for the children as well. I felt for Jack too, there was room in that wagon but they just didn‘t know the risk at the time. It was certainly a rough life with danger at every turn. 2mo
Bookwormjillk So sad about Jack. Poor Laura. 2mo
julieclair Like @TheQuietQuill , I found this chapter to be terrifying. And poor Jack. I don't understand why Pa wouldn't just let him ride in the wagon. I also didn't realize that families set out on these perilous journeys alone. I always had the impression they traveled in wagon train groups. They must have really really wanted to move West, to make a trip of this sort worth it. 2mo
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TEArificbooks The journey west was no picnic. There really were a million ways to die in the west and thousands died traveling to make a new life for themselves. The westward expansion movement is heavily romanticized but it was super dangerous. I doubt I could have done that to my family. Moving is one thing, doing it like that is a “nope.” 2mo
mrp27 Yes this chapter was terrifying but what struck me the most was how Jack was made to walk! Sheesh, even their pets worked so hard. I tried to imagine my dog walking that much and she would have been whining to ride in the wagon! 😂 2mo
KristiAhlers This chapter bothered me as a child and as an adult. 2mo
sblbooks @julieclair I wondered about the wagon trains too. Was that only if you were going to Oregon or California? Extremely dangerous! 2mo
julieclair @sblbooks Even after only 2 chapters, this book is helping me realize how little I know about the westward pioneers. 2mo
sblbooks @julieclair True! I've read several books on the topic, and watched numerous documentaries, but there's always so much more to learn. I may have to do another deep dive. 2mo
BarbaraJean @TheQuietQuill @julieclair I felt the same way—terrifying. The danger of the journey does NOT seem balanced out by Pa‘s reasons for going. It seemed like they had a good life in Wisconsin. No doubt there was more to it than Laura reports in the first chapter, but the woods getting more “crowded” isn‘t enough of a reason to leave all your relatives behind & risk your entire family‘s lives on a journey like this—there must have been other solutions 2mo
Vansa If I had been her,I would have got another entire book series just out of their journey!I wonder how they managed something so long and arduous with 3 little children,one of them a baby!Pa Wilder has put his long suffering family through a lot!Lovely comments,reading them I realised that it wasn't just wagon trails setting out,there might have been families who set off by themselves too. 2mo
IamIamIam I was thinking about Carrie the whole time! Mary & Laura were in the bed of the wagon but where was the baby when Ma had to drive the wagon? Really terrifying, I agree with everyone... and poor Jack... 😮‍💨 2mo
megnews @julieclair @sblbooks I had the same thoughts about them going alone. It seems like it probably wasn‘t common. 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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#LittleHouse on the Prairie: Chapter 1 already finds us packing up and on the move from the big woods of Wisconsin to the prairie of Kansas. What were your observations as we begin a new journey with Laura and the Ingalls family?

tpixie What a touching quote!! 2mo
Roary47 I relate to their mom in not wanting to travel in the cold. I guess the heat would have its own set of problems. 2mo
TheAromaofBooks I have always thought of this as more of a westward journey, when they're actually going more south! 2mo
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julieclair The scene where they were saying goodbye to all their family, knowing they might never see them again, was so moving. It made me think about my great-great-grandparents, leaving England to come to America. What courage it took! 2mo
BarbaraJean I loved Laura‘s description of the circle of sky! Such different terrain than they were used to, to be able to see all the way to the horizon on all sides. 2mo
sblbooks I like that quote too. I laughed when I read the quote about when Mom told Laura to stop complaining, and she said she was naughty inside, that she thought complaints to herself.😂 2mo
Bookwormjillk @sblbooks that was my favorite too! 2mo
Ann_Reads This was an eventful chapter. A bit frightening as they could hear the cracking of the ice just hours after they crossed the river. I felt sorry for the little house and thought Mr. Ingalls was making a selfish decision taking them away from their extended family to go where "wild animals could live without being afraid." (Part of this is in hindsight, as I've read the book multiple times. I don't think I had the same reaction as a child.) 2mo
mrp27 This is the adventure that appeals to me! It was sad to see the house and life in the big woods go but excited for all the new that is coming their way. 2mo
megnews @TheAromaofBooks I had the same thought!! 2mo
megnews @sblbooks @Bookwormjillk I highlighted that quote too. I love how mischievous and honest Laura is. 2mo
IamIamIam This is so nerve-wracking for me!!! They were so brave to just pick up and leave the comfort of a town nearby and relatives! I loved that Laura was getting fresh... it's got to be immensely hard for the girls to spend the days just sitting. They didn't have much to entertain them and I'm not sure the family had books or if they even would have taken them! 2mo
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megnews
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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The #LittleHouse buddy read continues with the 3rd in the series beginning Jan 14. All are welcome!

Vansa Please continue to tag me! I'm hugely enjoying this. 3mo
BarbaraJean I‘m looking forward to continuing the buddy read! 3mo
mrp27 Finding it hard not to fly through the rest of Farmer Boy so I can start this one. 😁 3mo
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Bookwormjillk Haha I agree with @mrp27

I feel like this is when the action really starts!
3mo
catebutler I‘ve loved following along so far! 3mo
keys_on_fire Yes this has been very enjoyable! 3mo
julieclair I haven't been able to keep up with Farmer Boy, but I would very much like to read Little House on the Prairie. Please add me to the tag list! 😃 Thanks! 3mo
Ann_Reads @megnews - Thank you for the reminder and for continuing on hosting the buddy read. Are you still doing okay with the daily posting? 3mo
megnews @Ann_Reads I worry occasionally that I‘ll miss a day. I‘m fine continuing but I‘d welcome anyone who wants to lead on one of the books. I know @sblbooks may be interested. 2mo
Ann_Reads @megnews I can most likely lead On the Banks of Plum Creek, if that would be helpful to you. That's one of my favorite books in the series. 2mo
megnews @Ann_Reads when we get closer to that one I‘ll check in with you. If you‘d still like to lead it‘s all yours. 2mo
Ann_Reads @megnews Okay. That sounds like a good plan. 2mo
megnews @Ann_Reads On the Banks of Plum Creek starts Feb 10. I was getting ready to do an announcement. Let me know if you‘d like to lead. No pressure!! 😊 2mo
Ann_Reads @megsnews Sure, I'd be happy to lead the discussion for On the Banks of Plum Creek. I don't think I'll do as good of a job of it as you, but I'll give it my best. 🙂🙂🙂 2mo
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Shannon_McKinney
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📚 Little House
✍️ Laura Ingalls Wilder
🎥 Little Fockers
🎤 Lauren Daigel
#manicmonday #letterL @CBee

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ellie_ember
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Bamazin
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Bookwormjillk
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A day late for #TravelTuesday

When I think of Kansas books Wizard of Oz and Little House definitely come to mind!

I loved visiting Monument Rocks in Kansas. What a cool feature of nature.

#RoadTripUSA @megnews

megnews I‘ve had Caroline on my tbr forever. I need to read it. 13mo
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Susanita
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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1. Little House on the Prairie of course!
2. A friend of mine works at the Cowtown Museum in Wichita, and that sounds like an interesting place to visit.
#Kansas
#RoadTripUSA
#TravelTuesday

megnews Little House really solidified my love for reading from a very young age. My Gran gave me the box set for Christmas and I tore through them all so many times! 13mo
Susanita @megnews I would read them straight through and then start over again. 13mo
KellyK The Mid-America All Indian Center is across the River from where I work. They have a wonderful collection of art by Blackbear Bosin in addition to the Keeper of the Plains sculpture in your photo. 13mo
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Darklunarose
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Pickpick

T another book read from the list of cottage core books I compiled!

RedxoHearts These were some of my favorite growing up. That copy is so pretty as well! 1y
Allylu My niece who is 7 is reading these with her father before she goes to sleep. 1y
Darklunarose @RedxoHearts I love this cover as well. I wish I had read them growing up. I do remember watching some of the tv show though. 1y
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Darklunarose @Allylu she will make so many memories with bed time reading. I homeschooled my kids and was so fond of read aloud. Even when the kids were older. 1y
Allylu @Darklunarose Rory is already in love with reading! She and her Dad read together after school - she reads to him, he reads to her - and before bed. I think it‘s wonderful! My husband read these to our kids, too. 1y
Kloves2read Love these books! Beautiful cover!🥰 1y
Darklunarose @Allylu it‘s how you foster that love of reading. They see you read, they want to read. 1y
Darklunarose @Kloves2read I had not seen this cover before but was pleasantly surprised with this one. 1y
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Darklunarose
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To continue my cottage core theme.

Booknerd222 That‘s so cute!! 1y
SRWCF That cover! 1y
Darklunarose @SRWCF it‘s truely beautiful! 1y
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KaraAnn90
Pickpick

Very good

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Texreader
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KCofKaysville
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Great account of life on the Kansas prairie after leaving the Big Woods. I especially liked the Christmas part, the scarey wolves, and the local Indians. Jack is a sturdy and protective dog also! I'm going to read one more and have a copy, but that's all for now. I also skipped the book about Almonzo's life. These pioneer stories are not much like the TV series, and are also not politically correct!

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KCofKaysville
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On to the second book in the series!

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annahenke
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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Pickpick

I‘ve been revisiting this series on Saturdays and read this one today - I still enjoyed it but this is mostly set in “Indian Country” and much of it is of it‘s time and a bit troubling except for Pa‘s perspective.

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Susanita
Little House on the Prairie | Laura Ingalls Wilder, Garth Williams
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1. Watergate and all its aftermath
2. I‘m literally surrounded by libraries…but I love my local indie bookstore too.
3. I read the Little House series the way my niece read Harry Potter. As soon as I got to the end of the series I‘d start all over again.
#wondrouswednesday

Eggs I did the same with the Little House books👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 2y
Ruthiella The Little House books were my gateway drug too! 2y
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