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The Man Who Fell to Earth
The Man Who Fell to Earth | Walter Tevis
Thomas Jerome Newton is an extraterrestrial from the planet Anthea, which has been devastated by a series of nuclear wars, and whose inhabitants are twice as intelligent as human beings. When he lands on Earth - in Kentucky, disguised as a human - it's with the intention of saving his own people from extinction. Newton patents some very advanced Anthean technology, which he uses to amass a fortune. He begins to build a spaceship to help the last 300 Antheans migrate to Earth. Meanwhile, Nathan Bryce, a chemistry professor in Iowa, is intrigued by some of the new products Newton's company brings to the market, and already suspects Newton of being an alien. As Bryce and the FBI close in, Newton finds his own clarity and sense of purpose diminishing.
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TieDyeDude
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Pickpick

Thanks for sharing, @Bookwomble This was an entertaining, quick-listen audio dramatization. I haven't read the book nor seen any of the adaptations, but I liked the story and I can see how it could be expanded in some engaging ways.

Bookwomble I'm glad you enjoyed it. I think they did pretty well with such a radical abridgement. The voice actors were good, and I was impressed by Christopher Eccleston's American accent as Nathan Bryce. Naturally, the book is better, and the film (IMO) is fantastic. 😊 2mo
47 likes1 comment
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Bookwomble
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Ruthiella 👍👍👍Thanks! 2mo
29 likes1 comment
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CSeydel
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#ReadingBracket2024

I kinda hate the bracket because I don‘t know how to compare books that are both excellent but completely different! Killers of a Certain Age was fun and entertaining and well written; the Man Who Fell to Earth was insightful and thought provoking and, of course, well written. How do I compare them head to head??

Anyway, Man Who Fell is the winner for April! #LitsySciFiBookClub

Deblovestoread It is hard! So many things come into play when I'm reading and each book provides a different experience. Mine picks usually have to do with emotion and how long I spend thinking of it after I'm done. 2mo
willaful I don't do brackets for this very reason. Too complicated! 2mo
Aims42 I gave up doing a bracket this year too for this exact same reason 😆 Now I just pick my favorite from the month and leave it at that. If at the end of the year I have a stand-alone favorite, great. If not, oh well 😇 2mo
CSeydel @Deblovestoread Yes! I have to remember just to have fun with it. I just end up doing it by feel and trying not to take it too seriously 😂 2mo
40 likes5 comments
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TheSpineView
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Here are a few questions on The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis. These are just to get us started. Please feel free to discuss anything about this book. There was a lot going in it and I would love to hear your thoughts. #LitsySciFiBookClub #LSFBC

@Larkken @Deblovestoread @bnp @Johanna414 @BookmarkTavern @julesG @sebrittainclark @BookBelle84 @Readergrrl @CSeydel @Roary47 @LeeRHarry

Ruthiella 1. think at least in part the book is to show how humans can‘t see beyond their own limited understanding and perspective, to our own detriment.
2. Was he an alcoholic? I never thought of him that way, interesting! In any case, I found him relatable in his need for solitude coupled with his need for companionship.
3. I never saw Newton as a Christ figure. Icarus fits in that his ambitions were too high and were ultimately his downfall.
4mo
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Bookwomble 1. That vested interest will outweigh wisdom. That we don't learn from experience. That technology can't save us if our intentions continue to be domination through force.
2. Tevis was actively alcoholic when he wrote the book, and alcoholism was a feature of many of his stories. I thought it an interesting inversion of culture shock, as historically alcoholism is a factor in the collapse of a colonised culture. Saying that, Newton does lose...
4mo
Bookwomble ... himself in American culture, "goes native", and perhaps alcohol is the haven of the alienated alien.
3. There's an early scene in which Newton sees a picture of Christ crucified and sees him as Anthean, so the comparison is there, but I think as a contrast between Christ's arrival being the salvation of the fallen universe and Newton's failure to save anything. The fate of Icarus is the overarching metaphor: the fall of Anthean civilisation...
4mo
Bookwomble ... through the misuse of technology, the incipient fall of human civilization, the literal and metaphorical fall of Newton from space to earth, and from grace to purgatory, if not damnation. Rumpelstiltskin span straw into gold, and Newton arrived not just with literal gold, but with the prime materials to create wealth from, essentially, nothing. Photography is the innovation most mentioned: wealth created by the conversion of the real into... 4mo
Bookwomble ... an image, and faery gold is traditionally illusory, lacks intrinsic value and eventually reverts to leaves and dust.
(My apologies for hogging bandwidth.)
4mo
kwmg40 Good observations here. I don't really have anything to add to the discussion, but the rest of you have given me more to think about. 4mo
rretzler I would agree that there have been some good observations. While reading the book, I felt that I could see the handwriting on the wall when Newton started at first to drink, as if that would ultimately lead to his downfall. So in answer to that question, I think it made him more human. But perhaps the Antheans were “human” anyway, as their civilization is a cautionary tale for our own. 3mo
37 likes9 comments
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RamsFan1963
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Pickpick

35/150 I've never seen the movie, and now I'm sure I don't want to. This book has an overwhelming sense of melancholy, not just from the MC, but everyone he encounters also seems to have lost hope and are barely hanging on. I thought the ending (non-ending?) was a bit abrupt and ambiguous, but it fit the story perfectly. 3 ⭐⭐⭐💫 #LitsySciFiBookClub

TheSpineView I agree. It is a sad book. 4mo
FlowerFairy I‘ve never seen this cover. I 🖤 it. 4mo
DieAReader 👋🏻Next! 4mo
Bookwomble It must be my "Eeyore" disposition: I love this book ? And, the film does follow the mood of the book, so definitely one for you to serve. 4mo
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kwmg40
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This was a low pick for me. I really liked the exploration of ideas and the plot was interesting and well paced, but it was a pretty gloomy story overall.

#LitsySciFiBookClub @TheSpineView
#192025 #1963 @Librarybelle
#gottacatchemall @PuddleJumper (prompt 61, Ponyta: Fantasy, paranormal, or sci-fi)

Ruthiella Definitely ends on a downer note. 🥲 4mo
Librarybelle Another year checked off for the #192025 challenge…hooray!! 4mo
TheSpineView It is a sad story! 4mo
43 likes3 comments
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Bookwomble
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This is the MC's drink of choice: straight gin with *loads* of angostura bitters! 🍸
What to call it? The Thomas Jerome Newton? An Anthean Martini?
I cannot drink it in the volumes that Newton does, and it won't be a regular feature on the drinks trolley, but it does taste medicinal, so perhaps if I need a bracing pick-me-up?
#BooksAndBooze

Ruthiella Cheers! 🥂 But I‘m with Dr. Bryce. I don‘t like the taste of gin. 4mo
Bookwomble @Ruthiella Cheers! 🥂😊 Despite being a whisky and soda man, he still managed to put quite a lot of gin away when he had to! 😄 4mo
batsy Am quite partial to gin, I must admit. Especially if it's the Botanist 😆🥂 4mo
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Bookwomble @batsy 🥂 Tommy would drink to that! 4mo
kwmg40 I'll have to try an “Anthean Martini“ sometime! 😄 4mo
Bookwomble @kwmg40 I managed to get it down, but it definitely tasted like a drink the bartender didn't finish making! 4mo
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Bookwomble
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Pickpick

Breughel's "The Fall of Icarus", explicitly referenced at the novel's start, sets the tone of grand failure. This is a pessimistic examination of humanity's probable (though not certain) inability to save itself from destruction. While Tevis had nuclear apocalypse in mind, there are parallels with the structural inability of vested interests to deal with the present climate crisis.
Re-read upgrade from 4 to 5⭐
#LitsySciFiBookClub #LSFBC ?

Bookwomble Thomas Jerome Newton, the eponymous protagonist and failed Christ figure, doubly unable to effect the salvation of his own dying people and that of his earthly planet of exile, is endearingly tragic in his inability to escape the perverse machinations of government agencies. Understandable though these may be, political advantage trumps wisdom.
The people of Newton's home planet, Anthea, learn about human culture from TV and radio broadcasts, and
(edited) 4mo
Bookwomble ... I wonder whether the name Thomas Jerome is a nod to cartoon antagonists Tom and Jerry, and the cat & mouse game of deception and obfuscation played by both earthlings & Antheans?
It's hard to identify Newton's home planet, as the information seems contradictory. Venus and Mars are too close, despite hints and possibly deceptive denials. Jupiter seems about the right distance, and as Anthea was a daughter of Jupiter to an ocean nymph, one of ⬇️
(edited) 4mo
Bookwomble ... the Jovian moons is a possible candidate.
My movie tie-in edition states that Bowie wrote the film score, which he did but director Nicholas Roeg decided not to use it, indicating the book was prepared for press before the film release. Bowie did rework his compositions for the second side of his album, Low, with its iconic cover art from the film.
There is apparently a lot of Tevis autobiography in the novel: as a child he was isolated due ⬇️
(edited) 4mo
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Bookwomble ... to illness, was uprooted from the city to rural Kansas, and was an alcoholic whose drinking significantly impacted his ability to work.
For a short novel, there's a lot going on, and I'm glad I re-read it 👽
(edited) 4mo
batsy This book sounds super intriguing, and that painting is one of my favourites 💜 4mo
Bookwomble @batsy I love it, but it has a mixed Litsy reception at 59%. Library Thing rating is 3.85 and GR is 4.05, so more highly regarded on those platforms. Just to give you a more democratic indication than my personal view 😄 The painting is intriguing, particularly in the way the title event is very much backgrounded. 4mo
batsy @Bookwomble Yes, something both hopeful and depressing in the depiction of that major event (hiz legs sticking out of the water) and life just going in the foreground. Re: the book, sometimes the most interesting ones have exactly this kind of mixed reception 🙂 4mo
kwmg40 Nice analysis of the book. I have to admit that the deep pessimism of the story affected my enjoyment of it, but I find that I'm still musing on the themes of the book. 4mo
Bookwomble @kwmg40 Thank you 😊 And your comment seems to bear out that of @batsy 🤝 I have a deep vein of pessimism, so maybe it struck a chord with me 😏 4mo
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Bookwomble
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"After two miles of walking he came to a town."

#FirstLineFridays @ShyBookOwl

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Bookwomble
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#TenuousLiteraryConnection 1: The epigraph for TMWFTE is a verse by Hart Crane, who was friends with poet Samuel Loveman, who was also a friend of H. P. Lovecraft, whose story "The Statement of Randolph Carter" I've just read, in which the doomed character Harley Warren is based on Loveman. (Yes, this is exceedingly tenuous!)
#LSFBC #BooksAndBowie

Bookwomble #TenuousLiteraryConnection 2: The cover of my edition is painted by George Underwood, David Bowie's childhood friend turned album and book cover artist, whose punch to the eye during a fight over a girl caused the injury resulting in heterochromia that contributed to David's air of otherworldliness, which was part of the mystique Nicholas Reg utilised when casting him in the film adaptation as alien visitor, Thomas Jerome Newton.
#BooksAndBowie
4mo
BarbaraBB Interesting! And a worthy photo for your profile as well! 4mo
bibliothecarivs A striking image 4mo
Bookwomble @BarbaraBB I have it (at least the "Low" album cover version) on a t-shirt, too ? 4mo
Bookwomble @bibliothecarivs It's one of my favourite Bowie images, and I've wanted that coat since forever! 4mo
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Bookwomble
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I'm starting The Man Who Fell to Earth for the March #LitsySciFiBookClub choice, and at 170 pages it hopefully won't take long. This is a re-read for me and I remember enjoying it, although I note the reviews of other #LSFBC members are mixed, so let's see if I enjoy it as much the second time around. Undoubtedly, my judgement will be positively affected by the Bowie connection 😁

psalva I remember it was so-so for me, but I think I may reread it at some point. I really want to see the Bowie film, however! 4mo
Bookwomble @psalva As far as the film goes, I really am biased! However it is considered a classic by most professional film critics, so you're probably safe in trusting their judgment 😊 4mo
quietlycuriouskate I recall this as one of the saddest books I've read. I have yet to see the film; I want to watch it but am not looking forward to the likely emotional fall-out. On a lighter note, I often think of Thomas Jerome Newton when I am subjected to the cacophony that passes for music in the locker room at the pool. 4mo
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The_Book_Ninja This was actually on the TV the other day. I turned the tv over and it was mostly finished…My wife said “Oh he was so handsome”. I went and made a cup of tea. That‘s my 2nd Bowie story. 4mo
Bookwomble @quietlycuriouskate I'm about half way through the book, and the film tracks pretty well up to this point. Tevis definitely hasn't set out to write an optimistic view of the future. I prefer to read listening to music; my wife finds most music a discordant jangle of random sounds, so possibly she's Anthean! 👽 4mo
Bookwomble @The_Book_Ninja Great story! 🫖😄 Mrs JT obviously has good taste 😁 4mo
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CatLass007
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Bailedbailed

#ReadAway2024 #LitsySciFiBookClub #HailTheBail I‘m learning to go with my first opinion about many things. When we read one of Ursula K. LeGuin‘s books for the #ClassicLSFBC (and I guess you can figure out that it wasn‘t my cup of tea because I can‘t remember the title) it was a reread for me. The first time I didn‘t like it but I wanted to give it another chance because it‘s been a while since high school. I still didn‘t like it. When (cont)⬇️

CatLass007 the movie of The Man Who Fell To Earth starring David Bowie was released in 1976, I read the book. I didn‘t care for it then and I didn‘t like it this time either. The first time around I finished the books. Since then I‘ve learned that my book time is valuable and I didn‘t push myself to finish something I wasn‘t enjoying. #HailTheBail 4mo
TheSpineView I am finding this one hard to read too. 4mo
dabbe #hailthebail! 🤩🤩🤩 4mo
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RamsFan1963 I just started it, only about 50 pages in, but it's okay so far. It does seem very sad, and I'm sure it will get more so. I've never seen the Bowie movie version, but I can't help thinking of him while I'm reading this. 4mo
DieAReader 👋🏻👋🏻👋🏻 4mo
CatLass007 @RamsFan1963 I‘ve never seen the movie either. I didn‘t want to see it after I read the book. It was the whole “the book is better than the movie” thing. (edited) 4mo
44 likes6 comments
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BookmarkTavern
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Mehso-so

An alien comes to Earth to save humanity. But will he change us, or will we change him?

I freely admit that this was well written, with some really fun technological innovations, & thoughts about isolation surrounded by people. But, for me, I usually want my sci fi to leave me with a feeling of hope. I finished this & just felt sad. So, definitely a your mileage may vary situation.🌕🌕🌗🌑🌑

BookmarkTavern Section 1988: Rumplestiltskin Chapter 6, medical experimentation 4mo
TheSpineView @BookmarkTavern Not done with this one yet. But I am getting the sad vibe too. I too perfer a more upbeat story. 4mo
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LitsyEvents
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Repost for @TheSpineView

The winner for our March selection is The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis. I found a copy at my library and it is also available as an ebook. Since my library is small, I am hoping you guys don't have any problem getting your hands on a copy. The page count is only 209 so it should be a quick read. Enjoy!

TheSpineView Thanks! 4mo
RamsFan1963 My library didn't have a print copy, so I borrowed an ebook from Libby. 4mo
33 likes3 comments
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TheSpineView
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The winner for our March selection is The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis. I found a copy at my library and it is also available as an ebook. Since my library is small, I am hoping you guys don't have any problem getting your hands on a copy. The page count is only 209 so it should be a quick read. Enjoy!

@Larkken @Deblovestoread @bnp @Johanna414 @BookmarkTavern @julesG @sebrittainclark @BookBelle84 @Readergrrl @CSeydel

See All 13 Comments
kwmg40 Fortunately, my library has an available copy! 5mo
TheSpineView @kwmg40 Awesome!💜📖🛸 5mo
BookwormAHN Audible has it and I believe it's one of their free titles. 5mo
TheSpineView @BookwormAHN Good to know. Thanks for that tidbit! 5mo
PageShifter I couldn't find it from the library but I'll check bookstores 5mo
Ruthiella My library has it on ebook and audio! Which is in part why it got my vote! 😆 5mo
Bookwomble Yay! I'm excited to re-read this one. I have two copies: one I've read that has a fairly boring generic cover, and one I haven't read that has a film tie-in cover, which is the one I'll be using 😊 5mo
TheSpineView @Bookwomble 😎😎😎 5mo
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psalva
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Mehso-so

I came into this without prior expectations. I haven‘t seen the movie nor read Tevis before. I was surprised to discover a sci-fi novel which seemed to include very few sci-fi elements. There‘s an alien from the planet Anthea with mysterious goals, but he seemed to represent a generic outsider to me. However, I was a little unclear what the allegorical takeaway was in the end. ⬇️

psalva I will say that I loved the writing at times, despite some dated language and stereotyping. I think I‘ll keep reading Tevis‘s work. His stories are so ubiquitous, and I love a lot of the films based on his work, so I am intrigued to compare them to his writing. (edited) 1y
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Bookwomble
Man Who Fell to Earth | Walter Tevis
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My daughter got me The Man Who Fell to Earth 40th Anniversary Blu-ray for Christmas, which has lots of inserts to drool over 🤤
Watching the film for the millionth time, but in HD instead of VHS, is amazing. I'm inspired to reread Tevis's novel some time later this year 👽

CBee 😍😍😍 2y
TrishB Great gift 😁 amazing film. @Birdsong28 👍🏻 2y
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Rissreads Oooooooo, love Bowie! ⚡️ 2y
Bookwomble @TrishB Better each time I watch it ☺️ 2y
Bookwomble @Rissreads Who wouldn't 🤷😁🧡 2y
vivastory Incredible!! 2y
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MommyWantsToReadHerBook
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Pickpick

I loved this so much!! So unexpected and beautifully written. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

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Decalino
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Pickpick

The author of the book Queen's Gambit also wrote SF, including this tragic 1963 novel about an alien on a lonely mission on Earth. He lands in Kentucky and struggles to fulfill his duty despite the pain of unaccustomed gravity and the constant effort of hiding his true nature. I've never seen the 70s movie with David Bowie based on this book, but it was easy to imagine him in the role. A haunting, gin-soaked story of alienation.

TrishB Bowie is beautiful in this film! 4y
Decalino @TrishB Now that I've read the book I really want to watch it! 4y
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quietlycuriouskate
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Pickpick

I haven't even seen the film but I still pictured him as David Bowie (and was thus amused by his voracious reading, and the fact that he finds human music painful to listen to). I wasn't expecting his story to be as sad as it is (though goodness knows we've a poor enough track record re our treatment of purported saviours) as Mr Newton becomes increasingly and hopelessly human. Not the wisest choice in my current state of mind but it is very good.

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LostInSpace
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Pickpick

Beautifully sad and well written, a tale of human nature and our desire to control, conquer and ruin everything we touch.

Very poignant given the times we are living in, such a thought provoking story, a must read for a Sci-fi fans 👽

#sciencefiction #sfmasterworks #bookreview #lovetoread

Eric_Allen Sounds interesting. I may have to give it a shot! 4y
LostInSpace @Eric_Allen it was really good I highly recommend! 4y
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TrishB
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#aspacemancametravelling #winterwonderland
Read the book many years ago and who can forget the film 💜

Cinfhen Bowie 🙌🏻❤️🥰 6y
batsy 💜 6y
Cathythoughts Perfect 👍🏻♥️ 6y
readordierachel Yes! ❤ 6y
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MommyOfTwo
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This is the only book that I have on my #JulyTBR lol. I have two book clubs that I will be getting books for to read. So #LetsGoCrazy and see where rest of the month takes me. #ReadingResolutions #PrinceOfJuly

vkois88 👍👍👍 6y
Stacy_31 Loved this book! 6y
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GraesynFenix
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Pickpick

It had this weird vibe to it... I didn't hate it but i didn't love it... It was this mellow in between 'yeah it was cool' kind of level.

MrBook Belatedly, welcome to Litsy! We hope you're enjoying our amazing community! 😊👍🏻 7y
RaimeyGallant A belated welcome to Litsy! P.S. If you check my post from yesterday, there's a link to a bunch of Litsy tips. 7y
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2BR02B
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Catching up on yesterday's #septembowie:

Have you read this underrated classic sci fi novel? Whether or not you've seen Nicolas Roeg's 1976 film adaptation, I highly recommend it. Tevis's spare, unsentimental prose make the title character's exile and alienation painfully vivid, and tragic. #spaceoddity

@Marchpane @Cinfhen

Cinfhen Another classic I haven't read or seen the movie 🙄 7y
TobeyTheScavengerMonk I've seen the film and own that edition, but haven't read it yet! 7y
2BR02B @TobeyTheScavengerMonk Get on it! I just read it for a second time last year, a few weeks after his death. 7y
TobeyTheScavengerMonk Roger roger! 7y
Marchpane Stacking this one, thanks! 7y
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GreydiaTheGeek
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My favorite Meetup to host: Coffee and a Good Book ☕️📚

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Owlizabeth
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Taking a break from final paper writing to get some out of doors time in - it's gorgeous in #RVA today!

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Owlizabeth
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Told the husband about my #epicslump and he handed me this. 🤞

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Misanthropester
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Pickpick

Estrangement & boredom. Literal alienation. I kinda love this story--no sex, no violence just an individual attempting to carve out a life in a strange world that's exhausting both emotionally & physically

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Misanthropester
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"He felt like a man who had been surrounded by reasonably amiable, silly, and fairly intelligent animals..."

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dariazeoli
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I'd seen this list last year when the article was published, but love the idea of David Bowie taking 400 books with him on a movie shoot! 😂

Has anyone attempted a Bowie's Favorite Books challenge?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/what-to-read/david-bowie-the-man-who-loved-book...

CocoReads That would be a cool challenge, although I don't think I could tackle any more challenges this year. Maybe in 2018 8y
CouronneDhiver That sounds like a neat idea :) 8y
Weaponxgirl Ive seen some of the list before, the man was very widely read! Made me love him more when I read somewhere that he was always reading at least two books at a time 8y
dariazeoli @CocoReads @CouronneDhiver 2018: 51.5 weeks away 😁 8y
dariazeoli @Weaponxgirl Definitely a man after Litsy's ❤️ 8y
19 likes5 comments
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Erik3003
Man Who Fell to Earth | Walter Tevis
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Verhaal voorafgaand aan de musical Lazarus morgenavond. Wat een prachtig boek!

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Misanthropester
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A sweet Christmas present! #DavidBowie

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MLRio
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Totally weird and totally worth it. #DavidBowie #Lazarus #London #theatre

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lidianams
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The Bowie Book Club in Goodreads will be starting November 1st.

Join us reading The Man Who Fell to Earth!

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robideg
Pickpick

This book was amazing! Great book for people who want to try Sci-Fi but are intimidated by it! The story is very relevant to society today even though it was written over 35 years ago. The writing is fluid and easy to devour and I promise you; you will want to devour this book!

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Annagiulia
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"Non era un uomo, eppure era molto simile a un uomo"

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CherylDeFranceschi
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Today's super find at the used book store. Possibly the first time in my life I actually WANTED the movie tie-in. If you've never read any Walter Tevis, I highly recommend this or The Queen's Gambit.

PurityofEssence The movie is great! I love Nicolas Roeg hahaha 8y
Chessa I've never read Tevis, but I feel a special kinship with him since he's always shelved next to my favorite SF author, Sheri S. Tepper. I've never seen this movie! Must remedy both. 8y
CherylDeFranceschi @Chessa I know how that is! There's just so much to read and view! But I think you'll enjoy both the book and the movie. 8y
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JohnnyUtah915
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Used book store find yesterday